Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 26, All day
Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 27, All day
Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 28, All day
Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 29, All day
Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 30, All day

WBB vs. Georgetown
Nov. 23, 02:00 pm
MBB vs. Rider
Nov. 24, 07:00 pm
Volleyball vs. West Virginia
Nov. 26, 06:00 pm
WBB vs. Iona
Nov. 26, 08:00 pm
Volleyball vs. Oklahoma
Nov. 29, 12:00 pm

Presenters

Central States Legal Writing Conference - Presenters

Central States Regional Legal Writing Conference
September 27-28, 2013 | #centralstates13


Keynote Speaker: Dan Bernstein

Dan Bernstein

Dan Bernstein is a professor of psychology at the University of Kansas. He was at the University of Nebraska -Lincoln from 1973 until 2002, when he became director of the Center for Teaching Excellence at KU. His recent writing has focused on electronic course portfolios centered on student learning, and he works with colleagues from many fields of study to showcase the quality of their student work and the practices that have helped that work emerge. A recent grant from the Teagle and Spencer Foundations enhanced writing and library skills through team-designed assignments and scaffolding, and a current Spencer Foundation grant supports research on the use of assessment data in course and curriculum change. Currently he explores and evaluates various uses of technology to promote student understanding, and his ongoing courses are a laboratory for evaluating the impact of out-of-class Web-based activities on deep understanding of conceptual material. He was a charter member of the University of Nebraska Academy of Distinguished Teachers, and he was a Carnegie Scholar in 1998. Recently he received the J. Michael Young Academic Advising Award at KU and the Fred S. Keller Behavioral Education Award from Division 25 of the American Psychological Association. He is currently the Gautt Teaching Scholar at KU CTE.


Robert Anderson

Robert Anderson

Robert Anderson has taught in the Lawyering Process program at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law for more than 10 years following a successful career in civil litigation, and service as a law clerk for Judge James Casebolt on the Colorado Court of Appeals. Anderson brings diverse teaching experience beyond his background in the Lawyering Process program, experience that includes teaching an introduction to the legal system to San Francisco middle school students, mentoring Boulder high school students participating as advocates in the Teen Court program, instructing classes of prospective law students preparing to take the LSAT, leading a seminar on effective writing for the National Conference of State Legislatures, and teaching appellate brief writing to practicing lawyers. Anderson lives in Denver with his wife and their two sons.


Debra Austin

Debra Austin

Debra Austin teaches Lawyering Process and Advanced Legal Research at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law. Her teaching and research is focused on lawyering skills, the neuroscience of learning, and how technology can be used to enhance teaching. Austin received the William T. Driscoll Master Educator Award in 2001. In April 2012, she was awarded a LWI-ALWD-LexisNexis Legal Writing Scholarship Grant for a project with the working title: "The Neuroscience of Cognition and a Prescription for Maximizing Brain Health and Cognitive Capacity." She was awarded a grant for integrating a SmartBoard and Student Response Systems into her legal skills courses from the Morgridge Family Foundation, and she was a co-investigator on a $1.2 million ITEST grant awarded by the National Science Foundation to study the role of interdisciplinary humane games in learning. Prior to Denver, Austin worked for West Publishing Company teaching lawyers in Denver and Salt Lake City how to use Westlaw, and she was a law clerk at Wendel, Rosen, Black, Dean & Levitan, in Oakland, Calif.


Susan Smith Bakhshian

Susan Smith Bakhshian

Susan Smith Bakhshian is the director of bar programs and academic success, and clinical professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, where she has taught since 1997. She currently teaches Bar Exam Writing, Law & Process: Privacy Torts (an academic success class), Remedies, and California Civil Procedure, but she also has 17 years of experience teaching Legal Writing, Legal Drafting, and Professional Responsibility. After graduating from Loyola’s evening program in 1991, she was a trial attorney representing clients in a variety of environmental and general civil litigation matters.


Jill Barton

Jill Barton

Jill Barton is a former appellate judicial clerk and an award-winning journalist. She earned her bachelor of journalism magna cum laude from the University of Missouri and worked as a journalist for more than a decade, mostly for the Associated Press in Florida. As an AP correspondent, she regularly published news stories in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Miami Herald. She later received her M.S. in journalism from the University of Kansas and her J.D. summa cum laude from the University of Missouri-Kansas City. In law school, Barton served as managing editor of the UMKC Law Review and as a teaching assistant for the school’s legal writing program. Prior to joining the Miami Law faculty, she clerked for Judge Leslie B. Rothenberg at Florida’s Third District Court of Appeal. She and colleague Rachel H. Smith are the authors of the forthcoming "Handbook for the New Legal Writer," a comprehensive legal writing textbook for first-year law students.


Susan Bay

Susan Bay

Susan Bay is an associate professor of legal writing at Marquette University Law School. She began teaching legal writing in 1998 as an adjunct professor at Marquette while she practiced environmental law in a large firm. She then taught legal writing full time at Penn State and Mercer Universities. In 2003, she took a hiatus from teaching to work as an attorney editor for Thomson Reuters. In 2010, she joined the full-time faculty at Marquette, where she teaches Legal Analysis, Writing, and Research and Advanced Legal Writing. She also serves as an associate editor of Legal Communication & Rhetoric: JALWD.


Mary Ann Becker

Mary Ann Becker

Mary Ann Becker is a senior instructor of Legal Analysis, Research, Writing and Communication at DePaul University College of Law in Chicago. She teaches first-year legal writing, second-year appellate brief writing, and advanced drafting classes in both pre-trial litigation and trusts and estates.  She earned a bachelor’s degree in French language and literature from Northwestern University and her J.D. from DePaul, graduating summa cum laude and Order of the Coif.


Rebecca Blemberg

Rebecca Blemberg

Rebecca Blemberg is an associate professor of legal writing at Marquette Law School in Milwaukee, Wis. She teaches Legal Analysis, Writing & Research I and II, Appellate Writing and Advocacy, and Legislative Drafting. Before joining the faculty in 2004, Blemberg worked as a criminal prosecutor in the domestic violence unit in Milwaukee County. She also served as a law clerk to Judge John W. Reynolds, U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Wisconsin. Blemberg is currently involved in expanding access to justice to indigent persons through the Wisconsin Access to Justice Commission. She is also a graduate student in philosophy.


Candace Mueller Centeno

Candace Mueller Centeno

Candace Mueller Centeno is a professor of legal writing. She is a graduate of Muhlenberg College (summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa) and Boston College Law School (cum laude). Prior to joining the legal writing faculty at Villanova Law School in 2006, Centeno was a defense litigator for 13 years at the law firm of White & Williams in Philadelphia, where she represented physicians, hospitals, and other health care professionals in medical malpractice and premise liability actions. Centeno continues to practice as a volunteer attorney at the Support Center for Child Advocates and is a hearing officer for the Pennsylvania Disciplinary Board. Centeno is actively involved in the national Legal Writing Institute (LWI), and she has helped coordinate and plan three LWI conferences (2010 program committee member and poster presentation chair, 2012 program committee co-chair, and 2014 conference co-chair). Centeno has published articles in Perspectives and the Second Draft, and she regularly presents at regional and national conferences; her scholarly interests focus on legal writing and analysis, with a particular interest in the incorporation of skills training in the classroom.


Maureen Collins

Maureen Collins

Maureen Collins is an assistant professor at the John Marshall Law School in Chicago. She teaches in the areas of Lawyering Skills, Intellectual Property, and Art Law. She has also taught Intellectual Property at Peking University in Beijing, China in conjunction with the John Marshall program. She serves on the board of Lawyers for the Creative Arts. Her work “Patchwork Protection: Copyright Protection for Quilts” reflects her love of quilting. She is frequently called upon to answer questions for fellow fiber artists. Her other articles address the application of the first sale doctrine in copyright law, and the legal history of the Green Bay Packers football team. Collins practiced law at Sidley & Austin before leaving to teach in, and then direct, the legal writing program at DePaul College of Law. She joined the John Marshall faculty in 2005.


Sha-Shana Crichton

Sha-Shana Crichton

Sha-Shana Crichton is an assistant professor of lawyering skills and interim director of the Legal Writing Program at Howard University School of Law. Prior to joining Howard’s faculty, Crichton was a litigation associate at the international law firm of Clifford Chance Rogers and Wells LLP (now Clifford Chance LLP) and president of Crichton and Associates Inc., a literary agency that represents writers of quality fiction and nonfiction. Crichton has traveled extensively across the United States lecturing on publishing matters. She is an active member of the Giles S. Rich American Inn of Court. Crichton is a proud graduate of Howard University School of Law (J.D., cum laude), where she was managing editor of the Howard Law Journal, and the University of the West Indies (B.A., honors). She speaks Spanish and French.


Melody Richardson Dailey

Melody Richardson Dailey

Melody Richardson Daily is a clinical professor of law and director of the Legal Research & Writing Program at the University of Missouri. She has been teaching legal writing since 1986. Daily teaches Legal Research & Writing, Advocacy & Research, Education Law & Policy, and Client Interviewing & Counseling. She directed Mizzou Law’s Externship program for 20 years, supervising more than 500 law student externs. She also taught in six summer programs for CLEO (Council on Legal Education Opportunity). She currently serves on the editorial board of Legal Communication and Rhetoric: J ALWD, and she has been an associate editor for Dispute Resolution Magazine and an editorial board member for the Journal of the Missouri Bar. Daily received her B.A. in English, her M.A. in English, and her J.D. from Mizzou. Before attending law school, she taught English composition to high school and university students. She practiced law in Glasgow, Missouri.


Mark DeForrest

Mark DeForrest

Mark DeForrest teaches at Gonzaga University School of Law, where he is an associate professor of legal research and writing. He attended Skagit Valley College and Western Washington University for his undergraduate education. After living and working in the Bay Area of California and Ketchikan, Alaska, he attended Gonzaga University School of Law as a Thomas More Scholar. He graduated in 1997 and clerked for the judges of the Superior Court of the State of Washington for Chelan County. He began his academic career in 1999 when he was appointed as a full-time lecturer in the department of law and justice at Central Washington University. He taught criminal procedure, family law, correctional law, and legal research to undergraduate students for two years. In Fall 2001, DeForrest returned to Gonzaga Law School and began work as a legal research and writing teacher.


Brad Desnoyer

Brad Desnoyer

Brad Desnoyer is an associate teaching professor at the University of Missouri School of Law, where he teaches Legal Research & Writing, Advocacy & Research, Advanced Legal Writing, Advertising Law, Academic Success, and Moot Court. Previously, he served as staff communications counsel at the Supreme Court of Missouri and as a clerk to Judge Laura Denvir Stith of the Supreme Court of Missouri. Additionally, he has written Batman comic books for DC Comics, provided research to The History Channel, and helped research and draft two New York Times bestsellers.


Jim Dimitri

Jim Dimitri

Jim Dimitri graduated summa cum laude from Valparaiso University School of Law, then practiced as a deputy attorney general in the Indiana Attorney General’s Office. He concentrated his practice in civil and criminal appeals, post-conviction relief proceedings, federal habeas corpus litigation, and tort litigation. In 1998, he was appointed to the faculty at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law, where he teaches Legal Analysis, Research, and Communication; Advanced Persuasive Writing and Oral Advocacy; and Moot Court. He is a founding member and co-chair of the Legal Writing Institute’s Moot Court Committee and has written and spoken about teaching legal writing, appellate advocacy, and persuasion. He has also spoken on the topics of intergenerational theory and the use of technology in teaching.


Michelle Falkoff

Michelle Falkoff

Michelle Falkoff joined Northwestern Law's communication and legal reasoning faculty as director and associate professor of law in 2013. She received her law degree from Columbia Law School and practiced intellectual property litigation in Silicon Valley for several years before going back to school to receive her Master of Fine Arts in fiction writing from the Iowa Writers' Workshop.


Paul Figley

Paul Figley

Paul Figley has been the associate director of legal rhetoric at American University’s Washington College of Law since 2006. Prior to that he was a U.S. Department of Justice litigator for 32 years, serving the last 15 years as deputy director in the torts branch of the civil division. At the Department of Justice, Figley represented the United States and its agencies in appellate and district court litigation involving torts, national security, and information law. He is a graduate of Southern Methodist University School of Law, where he was leading articles editor for the Journal of Air Law & Commerce, and Franklin & Marshall College. Since joining the WCL faculty, Figley has given writing workshops to government agencies and national organizations and written for national legal writing publications. He has also published articles in scholarly journals and a book.


Emily Grant

Emily Grant

Emily Grant is an associate professor at Washburn University School of Law, where she teaches Legal Research and Writing, and Decedents’ Estates and Trusts. Her teaching career began at her alma mater, the University of Illinois College of Law. At Illinois, her teaching responsibilities included legal research and writing courses for first-year law students and for international students seeking their LL.M. degrees. Before coming to Washburn in 2011, she was a lawyering professor at the University of Kansas School of Law.


Melissa Greipp

Melissa Greipp

Melissa Greipp is an associate professor of legal writing at Marquette University Law School. She teaches first-year legal writing and Appellate Writing and Advocacy, and she advises the moot court program. Before entering private practice, Greipp was a law clerk to Justice N. Patrick Crooks of the Wisconsin Supreme Court. Greipp received her B.A., cum laude, from Wellesley College and her J.D., cum laude, from Marquette University Law School.


Chelsi Hayden

Chelsi Hayden

Chelsi Hayden joined the KU Law faculty as an adjunct lawyering professor in 2011 and became a professor in the Lawyering Skills Program in 2012. Before entering academia, Hayden served as chambers counsel to Judge Carlos Murguia of the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas and as an associate in business litigation for Shook, Hardy & Bacon in Kansas City, Missouri. She has extensive experience in both civil and criminal law and has litigated both state and federal cases, including for the Kansas Supreme Court. Hayden is also active in the community, serving as president of the Kansas Land Trust and board member for The Willow Domestic Violence Center in Lawrence.


Aaron M. House

Aaron M. House

Aaron M. House received his B.A. in chemistry in 2001 and his J.D., magna cum laude, in 2005, both from the University of Missouri-Kansas City. After law school, he clerked for Judge Laura Denvir Stith of the Supreme Court of Missouri. House began practicing in 2006 with Shughart Thomson and Kilroy, where he drafted trial and appellate briefs, including briefs filed in the Supreme Court of the United States and the 7th, 8th and 10th Circuit Courts of Appeals. In 2007, House moved to Husch Blackwell, where he concentrated in commercial finance. He began teaching at the UMKC School of Law in 2010.


Kimberly P. Jordan

Kimberly P. Jordan

Kimberly P. Jordan is director of the Justice for Children Project and an assistant clinical professor of law at The Ohio State University Moritz College of  Law. She directs the Justice for Children Clinic, where third-year law students represent children in Franklin County Juvenile Court. Prior to joining Moritz, Jordan was a senior attorney at the Legal Aid Society of Southwest Ohio, where she specialized in family law and the representation of children. She started her career as a staff attorney at the Legal Assistance Foundation of Metropolitan Chicago, and represented indigent criminal defendants at the Illinois Office of the Appellate Defender. She served in the Jesuit Volunteer Corps and was a licensed substance abuse counselor. Jordan is a graduate of the Loyola University Chicago School of Law, where she was a ChildLaw Fellow, and Xavier University.


Alison Julien

Alison Julien

Alison Julien is a professor of legal writing at Marquette University Law School. She teaches Legal Analysis, Writing & Research 1 and 2 and Advanced Legal Writing. Before joining the faculty in 2001, Julien practiced for five years at a small law firm; her practice focused on civil litigation and special education law. She also served as a law clerk to the Hon. Justin M. Johnson of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania. She is a member of ALWD and serves as secretary on the LWI board of directors.


Jamie A. Kleppetsch

Jamie A. Kleppetsch

Jamie A. Kleppetsch is an assistant professor and the associate director of the Academic Achievement Program at The John Marshall Law School in Chicago. She provides academic support to students on study skills and time management techniques, and prepares students for the bar exam. She teaches Writing for the Practice of Law, which prepares students for practical writing in the practice of law and the Multistate Performance Test portion of the bar exam while exposing them to the areas of Illinois Civil Procedure that they will use most in the practice of law. Additionally, Kleppetsch is a board member of the AALS Section on Academic Support and serves on the section’s Bar Passage Committee.


Tonya Kowalski

Tonya Kowalski

Tonya Kowalski, professor of law at Washburn University School of Law, is a Duke Law graduate and entered law teaching in the Indian Legal Clinic at Arizona State. She is also a contributing faculty member in the Institute for Law Teaching and Learning. She writes and teaches in the areas of law teaching and learning; legal writing; clinical legal education; tribal law and courts; and federal Indian law. In the area of legal education, Kowalski studies the transfer of learning and how it can be applied within a single course or across the law curriculum. She also studies international legal education, legal methods, and legal writing programs, and recently began co-teaching a series of legal writing program development workshops at Free University of Tbilisi School of Law in the Republic of Georgia under USAID program. In Summer 2013, she was scholar-in-residence at Symbiosis International Law School in Pune, Maharashtra, India, and also taught a legal analysis and mooting skills program for first-year LL.B. students there.


Katrina Lee

Katrina Lee

Katrina Lee, assistant clinical professor of law, teaches Legal Analysis & Writing and Legal Negotiations at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law. She came to Moritz after a 12-year career in complex civil litigation, including more than six years as an equity partner at the national law firm Nossaman LLP. Lee graduated in 1997 from the University of California at Berkeley School of Law. She is a board member of the Asian Pacific American Bar Association of Central Ohio.


Allison Martin

Allison Martin

Allison Martin teaches Legal Writing, Litigation Drafting, and Professional Responsibility at the Indiana University McKinney School of Law in Indianapolis. In her 17th year of teaching, she also has written articles and presented extensively in the areas of legal education, teaching, and legal writing.


Shannon Moritz

Shannon Moritz

Shannon Moritz is the director of legal writing at the University of Illinois College of Law in Champaign, Ill. Prior to teaching at the College of Law, she practiced labor and employment law at a large firm in Chicago. She has taught courses including Legal Research & Writing, Legal Writing & Analysis, Introduction to Advocacy, Employment Discrimination, and courses in advanced legal writing.


Kelly Mulholland

Kelly Mulholland

Kelly Mulholland, assistant professor, joined the St. Louis University School of Law four years ago and has taught Legal Writing and Research, Contract Drafting, and Federal Income Taxation. Previously, she practiced at private law firms in Chicago and the Silicon Valley, concentrating on federal corporate and international taxation with a particular interest in tax litigation. She also served as a trial attorney for the Internal Revenue Service in San Jose, Calif. Mulholland clerked for Judge Charles P. Kocoras of the U.S. District Court, Northern District of Illinois. She received her J.D. from Harvard Law School, cum laude, and her B.A. from the University of Illinois, summa cum laude, and is licensed to practice in Missouri, Illinois and California.


Anne Mullins

Anne Mullins

Anne Mullins is an assistant professor at the University of North Dakota School of Law. She teaches in the areas of legal research and writing, judicial writing, and trial advocacy. Her scholarship focuses on judicial writing and judicial decision-making. Mullins started her academic career at the University of Oregon School of Law in the Legal Research and Writing Program. Before entering academia, she practiced complex commercial litigation at Susman Godfrey LLP in Houston, Texas, where she represented plaintiffs and defendants in high-stakes cases. She clerked for Chief Judge Sarah S. Vance in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana, and Judge Jacques L. Wiener in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit. She received her J.D., with honors, from the University of Chicago School of Law, and her A.B. from Dartmouth College.


Michael D. Murray

Michael D. Murray

Michael D. Murray is associate professor of law at Valparaiso University School of Law. He taught at the University of Illinois College of Law from 2002 to 2008, and at Saint Louis University School of Law from 1998 to 2002. Murray is the author or coauthor of 18 books and numerous law review articles on art law, copyright, right of publicity, civil procedure, First Amendment and freedom of expression, intellectual property law, legal research and analysis, and legal rhetoric. Murray graduated summa cum laude from Loyola University in Maryland, and from Columbia Law School, where he was a Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar. Before he began teaching, he practiced commercial, intellectual property, and products liability litigation for seven years at Bryan Cave law firm in St. Louis. Among his most recent works is "Advanced Legal Writing and Oral Advocacy: Trials, Appeals, and Moot Court" (Foundation Press, forthcoming Dec. 2013) (with DeSanctis).


Mary Nagel

Mary Nagel

Mary Nagel is an assistant professor and associate director of the Lawyering Skills Department at The John Marshall Law School. She has taught all four semesters of the required Lawyering Skills classes. The first semester focuses on objective predictive writing; the second semester is trial advocacy; the third semester emphasizes appellate advocacy; and the fourth semester concentrates on drafting documents. Additionally, she teaches Civil Procedure I and II as well as Federal Courts. Prior to teaching full time, Nagel was a litigator for almost 20 years and had worked in both the private and public sectors. She first taught as an adjunct professor in 1999 and began teaching full-time in 2007. Nagel has lectured throughout the United States on a number of legal writing topics, including legal writing in doctrinal classes, academic achievement in lawyering skills, initial introductions to working with the bar, and alternative methods of lawyering skills teaching. Nagel also assists students in procuring legal externships and judicial clerkships. Additionally, she coaches a number of teams in preparation for moot court competitions throughout the U.S. 


Kathleen Dillon Narko

Kathleen Dillon Narko

Kathleen Dillon Narko teaches Communication and Legal Reasoning. Her focus is teaching legal analysis through the vehicle of writing. She is a frequent presenter at national and regional Legal Writing Institute conferences, and has written and spoken on a variety of topics related to communication and legal analysis. Her research interests include collaboration and learning theory and integration of analytical communication in law practice. Prior to joining the faculty at Northwestern University Law School, Narko practiced with a large law firm concentrating in the areas of commercial litigation and environmental, safety and health law. She received her J.D. from Cornell Law School and her B.A. in history, cum laude, from Yale University. Following her undergraduate degree, she attended Salzburg College in Salzburg, Austria.


Anthony Niedwiecki

Anthony Niedwiecki

Anthony Niedwiecki is associate dean of skills, experiential learning, and assessment at The John Marshall Law School in Chicago. He previously taught at Nova Southeastern, Temple, and Arizona State. Niedwiecki teaches courses in lawyering skills, labor and employment law, law and sexuality, and rhetoric. His scholarly interests include integrating educational assessment and learning theory into the law school curriculum. He also writes in areas of rhetoric, politics and the law. Niedwiecki is immediate past president of the Association of Legal Writing Directors. He also served as vice mayor of Oakland Park, Florida before moving to Chicago.


Michael D. Oeser

Michael D. Oeser

Michael D. Oeser has taught legal writing for four-plus years. He will join the University of Arkansas-Little Rock’s legal writing faculty this fall as a visiting associate professor. His teaching experience also includes Transactional Drafting, Contracts, and Business Organizations. He earned his J.D. and LL.M. from the University of Wisconsin. He received his master's as a William H. Hastie Fellow. The William Mitchell Law Review published his master's thesis: "Tribal Citizen Participation in State and National Politics: Welcome Wagon or Trojan Horse?" 36 Wm. Mitchell L. Rev. 793 (2010). His research focuses on Indian law, legal writing, and civil rights. His next article will analyze flaws in the two dominant methods tribes use to determine citizenship.


Carol Parker

Carol Parker

Carol Parker joined the faculty of the University of Tennessee College of Law in 1994 as director of legal writing and has served as associate dean for academic affairs since 2008. Before coming to Tennessee, she taught in and directed legal writing programs at Indiana University and DePaul University and practiced law with Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal in Chicago. She teaches Legal Process, Torts, Health Care Law & Regulation, and Health Care Policy, and has also taught Intellectual Property, Copyright Law, and Law and Medicine and served as coordinator of the College of Law's academic support program. She has written articles on legal writing, legal education, and torts and is a co-author of a book on Tennessee legal research. She has served as a member of the editorial board of the Journal of the Association of Legal Writing Directors, chair of the Association of American Law Schools Section on Legal Writing, Reasoning, and Research, and as a member of the board of directors of the Legal Writing Institute. In 2010, she received the Thomas F. Blackwell Memorial Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Field of Legal Writing, awarded by the Legal Writing Institute and the Association of Legal Writing Directors. She also received the College of Law's Carden Award for Outstanding Service to the Institution in 1996, 2002, and 2009, and the Forest W. Lacey Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Moot Court Program in 1998 and 2010.


Judy Popper

Judy Popper

Judy Popper joined the University of Missouri-Kansas City law faculty in 2001 after a 15-year career in civil and criminal law enforcement with the Missouri Attorney General’s Office, consumer protection division. A French major in college, she enjoys teaching the effective use of language in the legal context. She currently teaches legal writing and consumer protection law (including a consumer lab/clinic) and has previously taught advanced legal writing for litigators. She also teaches and counsels UMKC’s graduates through its bar prep program. She started UMKC’s integrated learning project for 1Ls in 2010 and continues to direct the project. She also acts as legal adviser for the consumer advocacy group Call for Action (through Kansas City’s local NBC affiliate station).


Jason Potter

Jason Potter

Jason Potter is a lecturer of legal skills at the University of Massachusetts School of Law. Prior to teaching at UMass, he spent two years as a professor of legal writing and research at the University of San Diego School of Law. Potter has also taught legal writing and research internationally. He was a C.V. Starr Lecturer of Law at Peking University School of Transnational Law in Shenzhen, China for two academic years. At PKU, he taught U.S. legal research and writing, advanced legal research, academic legal writing, contract drafting, and legal English. Potter has presented at multiple conferences on the topic of incorporating multimedia and new technologies into legal writing curricula. He authors a blog, Researchfreedom.com, devoted to exploring free research platforms such as Google Scholar. Potter is a graduate of NYU School of Law, where he was editor-in-chief of the NYU Review of Law & Social Change.


Susan E. Provenzano

Susan E. Provenzano

Susan E. Provenzano teaches in the areas of appellate advocacy, employment law, and legal communication at the Northwestern University School of Law. She has served the law school in many capacities, including as interim dean of students and director of communication and legal reasoning. Provenzano has chaired both the law school’s Communications Task Force and the Faculty Judicial Clerkship Committee. In recognition of her teaching, Provenzano has received Dean’s Teaching Awards and the SBA Faculty Appreciation Award. Before joining Northwestern Law’s faculty in 2001, Provenzano clerked for Judge Ruben Castillo, U.S. District Court, Northern District of Illinois. She also practiced employment, labor, and commercial litigation at the law firms of Kirkland & Ellis, Mayer Brown, and Franczek Radelet. As a practicing attorney, she handled a wide range of litigation matters and drafted appellate briefs to the United States Supreme Court and other federal and state courts of appeals. Provenzano received her law degree with honors from the University of Wisconsin Law School, where she served as editor-in-chief of the Wisconsin Law Review.


Lisa Rich

Lisa Rich

Lisa Rich joined the faculty of Texas A&M University School of Law in 2012. Before that, she served as director of legislative and public affairs for the United States Sentencing Commission. Rich has taught legal writing and criminal procedure courses as an adjunct professor at George Mason University School of Law, George Washington School of Law, and Howard University School of law. She also has taught courses in constitutional law, legislation, federal sentencing, and legal research and writing as a visiting professor at the University of Wyoming School of Law. Rich has worked in private practice and spent a number of years with various committees of the United States House of Representatives. Rich’s scholarly interests relate to her background in federal sentencing and the federal legislative process. Her research focuses on federal sentencing reform, the criminal justice process from a legislative perspective, and community reentry. Rich earned her J.D. from American University’s Washington College of Law. She graduated with honors from St. Andrews Presbyterian College with a B.A. in international politics and studied at the Beijing Foreign Languages Normal College in Beijing, China.


Judy Rosenbaum

Judy Rosenbaum

Judy Rosenbaum is a clinical professor of law entering her 30th year of teaching research and writing courses at Northwestern University School of Law. For 27 of those years, she taught in and then directed the first-year research and writing course called Communication & Legal Reasoning. She is currently teaching Advanced Legal Research and Basic Contract Drafting. She also teaches LL.M. students Torts in Northwestern’s summer Legal English Program, and Civil Procedure, Torts and Contract Drafting in the Korean Executive LL.M. program. During her time at Northwestern, she has also taught Advanced Legal Writing and served for five years as the coordinator of the Academic Success Program. She has presented on research and writing matters at national and regional legal writing conferences; published small pieces in Perspectives and Second Draft, also about research and writing matters; and published more substantial articles and books about judicial ethics and court unification.


Suzanne Rowe

Suzanne Rowe

Suzanne Rowe is the James L. and Ilene R. Hershner Professor of Law at the University of Oregon School of Law. She is a graduate of Columbia University School of Law. Rowe has held leadership positions in the Association of Legal Writing Directors, the Legal Writing Institute, and the AALS Section on Legal Writing, Reasoning, and Research, and she has served on three ABA Site Visit accreditation teams. She is an author of six books on legal research and edits the Legal Research Series published by Carolina Academic Press; her newest title is "Federal Legal Research." She has written articles on the Americans with Disabilities Act and on legal writing programs and pedagogy. She originated a monthly column, "The Legal Writer,"" in the Oregon State Bar Bulletin. In 2011, Rowe received Oregon Law's Orlando J. Hollis Faculty Teaching Award. She is the 2012 recipient of the Thomas F. Blackwell Award for outstanding achievement in legal writing.


Aylon Schulte

Aylon Schulte

Aylon Schulte has been part of the University of Illinois College of Law faculty for over a decade. Before teaching, she practiced in a large-firm setting and at a federal government agency. She has taught courses including Legal Research & Writing, Legal Writing & Analysis, Introduction to Advocacy, and Law & Literature.


Laura K. Schulz

Laura K. Schulz

Laura K. Schulz returned to her alma mater, Saint Louis University School of Law, to teach legal writing after practicing at Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP in the firm’s office in Tampa, Florida. Her practice focused on product liability, particularly pharmaceutical, medical device, and tobacco actions. She also interned for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit, the Office of the United States Trustee, Eastern District of Missouri, and the ACLU of Eastern Missouri. She is a regular co-columnist for a column titled "From SLU's Legal Writing Program" in the Missouri Bar's Young Lawyer newsletter.


Betsy Brand Six

Betsy Brand Six

Betsy Brand Six is a lawyering skills professor and director of academic resources at the University of Kansas School of Law. She has been teaching Lawyering Skills since 2004. In 2010, she developed the new Academic Resources Program for the law school, which provides targeted academic support to at-risk students and provides additional academic support to all students, including upper-level students. A graduate of Stanford Law School, Six practiced environmental law for 13 years before she started teaching.


Nancy Soonpaa

Nancy Soonpaa

Since 2001, Nancy Soonpaa has taught at Texas Tech University School of Law, where she directs and teaches in the Legal Practice Program and teaches Health Law, Negotiating, and Family Law. Soonpaa regularly presents at professional conferences, including those of the Association of American Law Schools, the Legal Writing Institute, the Association of Legal Writing Directors, and the Institute for Law Teaching and Learning. In addition, she teaches CLEs and professional training workshops on legal writing. Her articles about legal writing often focus on effective pedagogical choices and learning theory and have appeared in several professional journals; she has also published an empirical study on law students and stress. She is one of the editor-authors of the second edition of the ABA’s Sourcebook on Legal Writing Programs. She is currently working on a Family Law casebook for Carolina Academic Press’s Context & Practice series.


Wanda Temm

Wanda Temm

Wanda Temm is a clinical professor of law and director of bar services at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law. She joined the faculty in 1991 and was the director of legal writing from 1999 to 2013. UMKC is now an autonomous legal writing program. Temm received the 2013 Provost’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, UMKC’s highest honor for excellence in teaching for clinical and teaching faculty. She received the 2012 Women’s Justice Legal Scholar Award from Missouri Publishers Media, which recognizes women faculty members who demonstrate leadership, integrity, service, sacrifice and accomplishment in improving the quality of justice and exemplifying the highest ideals of the legal profession. Temm co-authored Missouri Legal Research and Missouri Legal Research Workbook. She presents regularly at regional and national conferences and currently serves as treasurer of the Association of Legal Writing Directors.

Contact Us

If you have any questions, please contact any member of the KU Law Lawyering Skills Program:

Pam Keller | pkeller@ku.edu
Betsy Six | bsix@ku.edu
Joyce Rosenberg | jrose@ku.edu
Chelsi Hayden | chelsihayden@ku.edu

Thank You to our Sponsors!

Westlaw logo

LexisNexis logo

Bloomberg Law logo

Why KU
  • One-third of full-time faculty have written casebooks used at U.S. law schools
  • 2 KU law faculty were U.S. Supreme Court clerks
  • KU’s Project for Innocence: 33 conviction reversals since 2009
  • 7,300+ alumni live in all 50 states and 18 foreign countries
  • #18 “best value” law school in the nation — National Jurist Magazine
  • 12 interdisciplinary joint degrees
  • 27th nationwide for lowest debt at graduation. — U.S. News & World Report
  • 70 percent of upper-level law classes have 25 or fewer students
  • Nearly 800 employment interviews at law school, 2012-13
  • Top 25% for number of 2013 grads hired by the nation’s largest law firms
  • 20th: for number of law alumni promoted to partner at the 250 largest law firms