Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy

Preventing the Ghost Town: What Rural Communities Need to Do to Survive in the Modern Economy

Law Journal Symposium

The Journal hosts an annual symposium at the University of Kansas School of Law. Speakers from across the nation attend to present papers and discuss an important public policy issue determined in advance by the Editorial Board. Papers submitted by symposium participants are published together in a Journal Symposium Issue.

2014 Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy Symposium

Preventing the Ghost Town: What Rural Communities Need to Do to Survive in the Modern Economy

February 21, 2014 | 8:15 am - 4:00 pm
Stinson Leonard Street LLP Lecture Hall | 104 Green Hall

Schedule
7:30-8:15 Check-in and Breakfast
8:15-8:25 Welcome & Overview of the Symposium Schedule
Dean Mazza, Dean and Professor, University of Kansas School of Law
Ashlee Yager, Editor-in-Chief, University of Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy
Amanda Marshall, Symposium Editor, Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy
8:25-9:15 Global Look at the Sustainability of the Rural Community (PDF)
In order to address the issue of the sustainability of rural communities, the topic needs to be addressed from a global perspective. Dr. Green will speak on how land use, business opportunities and needs, and governmental needs and challenges are inextricably connected for rural communities attempting to develop strategies for economic development.

Dr. Gary Green, University of Wisconsin
9:15-9:30 Break
9:30-10:20 Land Use and Sustainability (PDF)
Rural communities face many tough challenges when attempting to balance land use with sustainable development. As an expert in the field of land use and sustainable development law, Dr. Nolon will address the current legal challenges rural communities face when balancing economic development with environmental sustainability law and discuss potential solutions.

Professor John Nolon, Pace Law
10:20-10:35 Break
10:35-12:15 Panel Discussion: Issues Rural Communities Face When Attempting to Maximize Land Usage
In rural communities, as land owners attempt to maximize land usage to increase profit, unique challenges have arisen. This panel will discuss the challenges in attempting to maximize land usage from the perspectives of wind energy, oil and gas, and agriculture. The panel will take an in-depth look at the legal challenges and issues when wind and mineral rights are severed from each other and the land, as well as the agricultural issues that arise as land owners attempt to maximize land use for multiple functions.

Professor K.K. DuVivier, University of Denver Sturm College of Law (PDF)
Professor David Pierce, Washburn University School of Law (PDF)
Wes Jackson, The Land Institute (PDF)
12:15-1:15 Break for Lunch
1:15-2:05 Legal Institutions for Rural Economic Development (PDF)
Professor Stephen Miller will discuss the application of urban economic and environmentally sustainable development models to the rural community. As an expert in the field, Professor Miller will speak to how land use law, administrative law, state and local government law, and environmental law all impact the application of the urban economic development model to the rural community.

Professor Stephen Miller, Associate Professor of Law and Director of the Economic Development Clinic, University of Idaho College of Law-Boise
2:05-2:25 Break
2:25-4:05 Panel Discussion: Governmental Needs and Challenges Faced by the Rural Community
This panel will address how the different governmental needs and challenges in the areas of health care, business development and Education intersect and conflict with each other. The speakers will discuss current programs available to help rural areas as well as address current needs and potential solutions. Panelist will discuss how the legal field can impact these various needs and challenges.

Sara Roberts, Director of Rural Healthcare in Kansas (PDF)
Patty Clark, Kansas Director of USDA Rural Development (PDF)
Donna Whiteman, Kansas Association of School Boards (PDF)
Andrew Kovar, Partner, Triplett, Woolf & Garretson (PDF)

The symposium is funded by the Judge Nelson Timothy Stephens Lectureship Fund. Scholarship from the symposium will be published in a 2014 issue of the Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy.

Program Accessibility
We accommodate persons with disabilities. Please submit your request no later than February 7 to cmai@ku.edu or 785-864-9208 TTY: 711.

Questions?
Contact symposium editor Amanda Marshall at kjlppsymposium@gmail.com.

 

2013 Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy Symposium

Who is 'We the People?'  Perspectives on Immigration Policy and Reform

February 22, 2013 | 9:15 am - 3:30 pm | Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP Lecture Hall | 104 Green Hall

2013 Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy Symposium poster

The Constitution declares at its opening with words written to dwarf all others in the document, “We the people.” A persistent question remains, though. Who is “We the people?” On behalf of the Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy, we would like to invite you to the 2013 symposium, “Who is ‘We the People’? Perspectives on Immigration Policy and Reform” at the University of Kansas School of Law in Lawrence, Kansas. The symposium is scheduled for Friday, February 22, 2013. We will have speakers from across the country grappling with concepts of national identity, race, and the intersection of public policy and our conception of what it means to be an American. We hope that you will join us for what promises to be an exciting and engaging program.

CLE Credit
4.5 hours of CLE credit for Kansas and Missouri attorneys will be offered. CLE materials will be available electronically on the symposium page for review and printing. Materials will not be available the day of the program in a paper version. All materials must be accessed electronically.

Registration and Breakfast
Registration will begin 8:30 a.m. on the day of the symposium. A light breakfast will be served.

Parking
Parking is available for $1.50 an hour in the Visitor Parking Garage, just south of Green Hall. Visitors who park in the surface lot east of the law school will be ticketed.

Questions?
Contact symposium editors David Austin and Julie Parisi at kjlppsymposium@gmail.com.

 
Schedule
8:30-9:15 Check-in and Breakfast
9:15-9:25 Welcome & Overview of the Symposium Schedule
Dean Stephen Mazza, University of Kansas School of Law
Henry Thomas, editor-in-chief, Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy
David Austin, co-symposium editor, Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy
Julie Parisi, co-symposium editor, Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy
9:25-10:15 The Right Against Removal: Harm Avoidance in Immigration Practice
Barbara Buckinx, political philosopher, junior fellow at University of California, San Diego
Alexandra Filindra, immigration scholar, political scientist, and assistant professor, University of Illinois at Chicago
Download CLE materials (PDF)
10:15-10:30 Break
10:30-11:20 Questions to Ask Before Creating Policy
Jan Ting, professor of immigration law, Temple University Beasley School of Law, and former assistant commissioner at the Immigration & Naturalization Service of the U.S. Department of Justice
Download CLE materials (PDF)
11:20-1:00 Break for lunch
1:00-1:50 The Architect and Architecture of Arizona's SB 1070
Margaret Hu, visiting assistant professor, Duke University School of Law
Download CLE materials (PDF)
1:50-2:15 Break
2:15-3:30 Panel Discussion: Perspectives on Meaningful Immigration Reform
Archbishop Joseph Naumann, Archdiocese of Kansas City
Michael Sharma-Crawford, immigration law practitioner
Mike O'Neal, president, Kansas Chamber of Commerce
Leon Versfeld, immigration practitioner with Versfeld & Hugo LLC

The symposium is funded by the Judge Nelson Timothy Stephens Lectureship Fund.

2012 Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy Symposium

Corporate Tax Reform: Making America Competitive

Feb. 10, 2012 | 10 am - 4:30 pm | 106/107 Green Hall

Corporate Tax Reform: Making America Competitive

We hope you will join us for the 2012 Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy Symposium, “Corporate Tax Reform: Making America Competitive.” The symposium will address the country's current tax crisis and how changes to the corporate tax code will offer relief for all Americans and alleviate the strain on domestic corporations. Free CLE credit will be offered for the event, which will be held at the University of Kansas School of Law.

The symposium will begin with a presentation by Joseph J. Thorndike offering a historical overview of corporate tax reform efforts, followed by a presentation from David Cay Johnston, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and best-selling taxation author. The event will continue in the afternoon with presentations by nationally recognized business professors George Plesko (University of Connecticut), Rosanne Altshuler (Rutgers University), and Raquel Meyer Alexander (University of Kansas).

CLE Credit
Two hours of CLE credit for Kansas and Missouri attorneys will be offered during the morning session. There is no charge. If you wish to receive CLE credit, please RSVP to kjlppsymposium@gmail.com. Materials will be emailed electronically or may be obtained the day of the event.

Registration and Breakfast
Registration will begin 9 a.m. on the day of the symposium. A light breakfast will be served.

Parking
Parking is available for $1.25 an hour in the Visitor Parking Garage, just south of Green Hall. Visitors who park in the surface lot east of the law school will be ticketed.

 
Schedule
9:00 - 10:00 Check-in and Breakfast
Morning Session (2 Hours CLE Credit) in Room 106
10:00 - 10:10 Welcome & Introductions
Stephen W. Mazza
Dean and Professor, University of Kansas, School of Law
10:10 - 11:00 The Durability of a Dysfunctional Tax: The Persistence of High Corporate Tax Rates in the United States
Joseph J. Thorndike
Director of the Tax History Project at Tax Analysts and contributing editor for Tax Notes magazine
11:10 - 12:00

Faux Reform and For Reform
David Cay Johnston
Distinguished Visiting Lecturer, Syracuse University College of Law
Pulitzer Prize-winning Reuters columnist and best-selling author

12:00 - 1:30 LUNCH
Afternoon Session in Room 107
1:30 - 2:20 Devilish Details of Corporate Tax Reform
George Plesko
Associate Professor, University of Connecticut School of Business
2:30 - 3:20 Options for International Tax Reform
Rosanne Altshuler
Professor of Economics, Rutgers University
3:30 - 4:20 How Can a VAT Contribute to Corporate Tax Reforms?
Raquel Meyer Alexander
Assistant Professor, University of Kansas School of Business

LeAnn Luna, Associate Professor of Accounting and Research Professor,
Center for Business and Economics Research, University of Tennessee

 

 

Contact the Law Journal

785-864-4550
journal@ku.edu

Faculty Advisors
Elinor Schroeder
785-864-9232
eschroed@ku.edu

Richard Levy
785-864-9220
rlevy@ku.edu

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