Media Law Clinic

Media Law Clinic

In the Media Law Clinic, students undertake practical, in-depth studies of law, policy, regulation, and professional ethics that shape the relationship between the communications media and such institutions as the judiciary, legislature, agencies, business, education, and the professions. Individual students or teams of students, supervised by the clinic director, prepare research reports in response to requests from the likes of:

  • lawyers
  • policymakers
  • publishers
  • others who are concerned with the free flow of accurate, fair, and timely news and information in a democratic society.

The clinic is designed to advance students' skills and knowledge in analyzing the rights and responsibilities of the communications media and the individuals and organizations that depend on those media to inform the citizenry.


Advocating for individual rights through media law: Jessica Frederick, L’16

Jessica Frederick, L'16

A self-described advocate, Jessica Frederick pursued law with the intent to help others. She found her niche with the Media Law Clinic and its focus on First Amendment and individual rights.

Frederick was drawn to the clinic by Professor Mike Kautsch and his open, student-centered teaching philosophy. The seminar’s discussion format exposed Frederick and her classmates to a variety of timely topics, from changing Federal Communications Commission regulations to anti-slap laws, celebrity stalking, the use of drones in reporting and former Minnesota Gov. Jessie Ventura’s defamation case against the late Navy SEAL Chris Kyle. Kautsch invited legal experts to visit the class and weigh in on the issues, while students pursued independent research and writing projects.

“I love to write, but I wanted to write about what I’m interested in,” Frederick said. “I definitely was not disappointed.”

Frederick’s project focused on the FCC’s Open Internet rules, which protect access to legal online content and prevent providers from granting some clients faster connection speeds than others. Her research culminated in an analysis that was shared with legal professionals at a media law conference in Kansas City. She plans to publish her paper and share it with prospective employers during her job search.

Frederick looks forward to applying the skills she honed in the Media Law Clinic to her future career in advocacy or government.

“The idea that I can help people secure individual rights or help the government in assisting low-income people better their lives is way more important to me than a paycheck,” Frederick said.

The clinic, open to second- and third-year students, is in the spring semester.

No application is required. Students enter the clinic by following standard enrollment procedures for:

LAW 959 Media Law Clinic
Practical, in-depth studies of law, policy, regulation, and professional ethics that shape the relationship between the communications media and such institutions as the judiciary, legislature, agencies, business, education, and the professions. Individual students or teams of students, supervised by the clinic director, prepare research reports in response to requests from lawyers, policy-makers, publishers, and others who are concerned with the free flow of accurate, fair, and timely news and information in a democratic society. The clinic is designed to advance students' skills and knowledge in analyzing the rights and responsibilities of the communications media and the individuals and organizations that depend on those media to inform the citizenry. FLD.

The class is not offered for the Fall 2015 semester.

 

 

 

Questions?

Mike Kautsch
Professor of Law
785-864-5377
mkautsch@ku.edu
 

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