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Midwest Clinical Legal Education Conference

Midwest Clinical Legal Education Conference on October 13-14, 2017 in Lawrence, Kansas

Justice, Professionalism, and the Lawyer as Public Citizen:
Teaching Across Learning Experiences

October 13-14, 2017
University of Kansas School of Law
Green Hall | Lawrence, KS

Deadline for proposals: May 19, 2017 
Registration opens: June 2017

Register online

As experiential legal educators, we play a significant role in transmitting the core values of our profession. We seek to orient our students’ professional compasses toward justice; to help them rise to our highest aspirational standards so that, regardless of where their careers lead, they may become “public citizen[s] having special responsibility for the quality of justice.” In clinics and field placements, we teach our students to examine and reflect upon issues of race, class, gender, and access to justice, to recognize the experience of the vulnerable and oppressed, and to consider our professional role in speaking for those who are least heard.  

Midwest Clinical Legal Education Conference on October 13-14, 2017 in Lawrence, Kansas

At this difficult national crossroads, clinics and field placements will be faced with increased calls for assistance, new civil rights challenges, and diminishing funding opportunities. What teaching methods, or clinical and field placement designs are developing in response to the national conversation? How do we as experiential educators meet these demands in light of the recent changes in the ABA Standards and the economic realities of law schools?

The conference will bring together clinic and field placement program educators who teach about justice, professionalism, and our duties as public citizens in an array of learning experiences. Together, participants will reflect upon issues of race, class, gender, and access to justice, and consider how to teach students to embrace our professional responsibility to promote the rule of law and speak for those who are least heard.  

In addition to plenary and concurrent sessions, the conference will feature “Spotlight on Teaching” sessions. These sessions will consist of a series of short 10-15 minute presentations on teachable moments, teaching tools, and new strategies. Our goal is that attendees leave with at least one teaching tool they can immediately implement in their programs.

For more information or to submit a proposal, please contact Jean Phillips at phillips@ku.edu.  

Friday, October 13
8:00 - 9:00 New Clinicians Continental Breakfast and Registration
First Floor Commons, Green Hall
9:00 - 12:00 New Clinicians Program
Green Hall
12:30 - 1:30 Main Conference Registration
First Floor Commons, Green Hall
1:30 - 2:45 Welcome & Opening Plenary | 104 Green Hall

Expanding Clinical Pedagogy: Opportunities and Challenges
Presenters:
Alexander Scherr, University of Georgia School of Law
Claudia Angelos, NYU School of Law
Phyllis Goldfarb, The George Washington University Law School
Ann Shalleck, American University Washington College of Law

2:45 - 3:00 Break
3:00 - 3:50 Concurrent Sessions | Green Hall

Using a Skills Self-Assessment to Measure Competency in Analysis Skills and Practical Skills
Presenter:
Wanda M. Temm, University of Missouri – Kansas City School of Law

Contesting and Disrupting Racial Narratives in Pedagogy and Practice
Presenters:
Danielle Jefferis, University of Denver Sturm College of Law
Renee Hatcher, John Marshall Law School
Brendan D. Roediger, St. Louis University School of Law

Brief Service Fairs: Identifying Learning Goals and Navigating Ethical Challenges
Presenters:
Gillian Chadwick, Washburn University School of Law
Michelle Ewert, Washburn University School of Law

3:50 - 4:00 Break
4:00 - 4:50 Concurrent Sessions | Green Hall

Assessing Reflective Practice: Do We Have Consensus?
Presenters:
Meg Reuter, University of Missouri – Kansas City
Jodi Balsam, Brooklyn Law School

Recognizing the Assets and Closing the Gaps in Underserved Communities Through Client-Centered Lawyering
Presenters:
Janet Thompson Jackson, Washburn University School of Law
John Francis, Washburn University School of Law

“Face” the Facts – Posting Can be a Perilous to Professionalism for Law Students, Lawyers and Judges: Just be NICE
Presenter:
Phyllis Williams Kotey, Florida International University College of Law

6:00 - 9:00 Reception and Banquet
The Oread
Keynote Speaker: Exoneree Floyd Bledsoe
Saturday, October 14
8:00 - 9:00 Continental Breakfast
First Floor Commons, Green Hall
9:00 - 10:10 Second Plenary | 104 Green Hall

Beyond Doctrine: A Study of the Role of Experiential Courses in the Law School Curriculum
Presenters:
Bob Kuehn, Washington University in St. Louis School of Law
David Moss, Wayne State University

10:10 - 10:20 Break
10:20 - 11:10 Concurrent Sessions | Green Hall

Beyond the Traditional Client/Attorney Paradigm: Modeling Professional Responsibility in an Increasingly Complex Ethical World; Guidance for Clinicians and Law Students Providing Cause-Driven Legal Services
Presenters:
Liz Ryan Cole, Vermont Law School
Jeannette Eicks, Vermont Law School
Kate Evans, University of Idaho College of Law
Jeannie Oliver, Vermont Law School

The 1L Clinic: Michigan Law’s Live Client Experiential Learning During the First Year
Presenters:
Steve Gray, University of Michigan School of Law
Samir Hanna, University of Michigan School of Law, Clinical Teaching Fellow

Leveraging Technology for Administrative Efficiency in Externships
Presenter:
Lauren Donald, University of Tulsa School of Law

11:10 - 11:20 Break
11:20 - 12:00 Spotlight on Teaching Sessions | Green Hall

Partnerships in Impact Litigation: Navigating Collaborations in the Big Case
Presenter:
John J. Ammann, St. Louis University School of Law

Team Building: How to help Team Members Collaborate Effectively
Presenters:
Jean Phillips, University of Kansas School of Law
Beth Cateforis, University of Kansas
Alice Craig, University of Kanas

12:15 - 1:15 Lunch | Colloquium, Capital Federal Hall
Client Confidentiality and the Right to Counsel: Taping of Attorney-Client Conversations at the Leavenworth Detention Center
Federal Public Defenders
1:35 - 2:45 Third Plenary | 104 Green Hall

Building on Best Practices: Professional Identity, Role Assumption, and Other Professional Skills Across Learning Experiences
Presenters:
Melanie DeRousse, University of Kansas School of Law
Carolyn Kaas, Quinnipiac University School of Law
Paula Schaefer, University of Tennessee College of Law

2:45 - 3:00 Break
3:00 - 3:50 Concurrent Sessions | Green Hall

The Tenant Assistance Project: A Collaboration between Law School, Courts, and Community
Presenter:
Jennifer S. Prusak, Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Looking Outside the Clinic to Teach Social Justice and Inspire Future Lawyers
Presenter:
Wendy Vaughn, Northern Illinois University College of Law Colleen Boraca, Northern Illinois University College of Law Spencer Rand, Temple University Beasley School of Law

Using “Why-Storming” to Navigate Clinical Transitions
Presenters:
John Allen, University of Iowa College of Law
Bram Elias, University of Iowa College of Law
Daria Fisher-Page, University of Iowa College of Law
Emily Hughes, University of Iowa College of Law
June Tai, University of Iowa College of Law

4:00 - 5:30 Closing Remarks and Reception | Rice Room, 5th Floor, Green Hall
See "Conference Sessions" tab for full descriptions of each session.

Our New Clinicians Program is designed for educators with less than five years of clinical experience and offered at no additional cost thanks to the generous support of the Clinical Legal Education Association. The program will run from 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 13 and will feature two sessions and a workshop. Complimentary continental breakfast will be provided to all new clinicians. Presenters and titles to be announced.

 
Friday, October 13
8:00 - 9:00 New Clinicians Continental Breakfast and Registration
First Floor Commons, Green Hall
9:00 - 9:10 Welcome and Introduction
Green Hall
9:10 - 10-:00 Clinic Design
Presenters:
Melanie DeRousse, University of Kansas School of Law
Wendy Vaughn, Northern Illinois University College of Law
10:00 - 10:50 Teaching
Presenter:
Alex Scherr, University of Georgia School of Law
10:50 - 11:40 Supervision
Presenter:
Janet Jackson, Washburn University School of Law
11:40 - 12:00 Wrap-Up

Draft Schedule

Plenary Sessions

Expanding Clinical Pedagogy: Opportunities and Challenges

Presenters:
Alexander Scherr, University of Georgia School of Law
Claudia Angelos, NYU School of Law
Phyllis Goldfarb, The George Washington University Law School
Ann Shalleck, American University Washington College of Law

In many law schools, clinical programs need to expand—to respond to the acute legal needs of increasingly vulnerable populations and to meet heightened demands for clinical opportunities. Acute legal needs come from a hostile political climate and heightened demand comes from multiple sources. These sources include new ABA regulations, requirements of state bar associations, and law students who perceive limitations in the legal employment market to necessitate a sharper focus on developing professional experience in practice-like settings.

Yet law schools are in an era of fiscal constraint. Restrictions on resources raise considerable challenges in expanding clinical opportunities to meet acute needs and heightened demands. In this program, we consider various strategies for expanding clinical opportunities while navigating these challenges and maintaining important pedagogies for learning and lawyering that clinicians have developed over many years. Together we will work through possibilities for expanding clinical opportunities in ways that confront current challenges, meet new regulatory requirements, and accomplish meaningful pedagogical goals.

Beyond Doctrine: A Study of the Role of Experiential Courses in the Law School Curriculum

Presenters:
Bob Kuehn, Washington University in St. Louis School of Law
David Moss, Wayne State University

What types of learning experiences should students have to become effective, ethical lawyers and public citizens with a special responsibility for the quality of justice? Most law schools in the United States give students enormous freedom to choose the types of experiences they will have once they have completed the required first-year curriculum. All newly admitted law students are required to take Professional Responsibility, earn at least six credits through experiential courses, and take at least one course that provides a rigorous writing experience. Beyond that, however, students generally are free to take whatever courses they like during their second and third years. Students can choose to fill the remainder of their plate with bar-related courses, load up on clinical offerings to develop their professional identity and practice skills, choose a nutritious combination of the two, or do none of the above.

Given this freedom, what types of learning experiences are students choosing to have after the first year of law school? What role do grades possibly play when students choose their experiences? And what impact are those choices having on their bar passage and employment outcomes after graduation? This session will present, for the first time, the results of a multi-school study of the relationship between law school course selection, bar passage, and employment outcomes for 2006-2015 J.D. graduates. The panelists will present the study’s findings and discuss its implications for ongoing debates over clinical course caps, mandated bar subject coursework that may squeeze out other important learning experiences, and enhanced experiential education requirements.

Building on Best Practices: Professional Identity, Role Assumption, and Other Professional Skills Across Learning Experiences

Presenters:
Carolyn Kaas, Quinnipiac University School of Law
Melanie DeRousse, University of Kansas School of Law
Paula Schaefer, University of Tennessee College of Law

The preamble to the ABA Model Rules includes a calling to the lawyer as “public citizen,” but what does that mean? In what ways are all lawyers required to perform in the public citizen role after graduation, and how can we prepare them for it? How do proficiencies associated with the lawyer’s responsibility as a public citizen become a more explicit outcome of legal training?

In this interactive plenary, we will distill the teachings of generations of law teachers, as set out in the CLEA project Building on Best Practices: Transforming Legal Education in a Changing World (Carolina 2015) in chapters on professionalism, professional identity, social justice, intercultural competency, and teaching the “other skills” imagined by ABA Standard 302. We will then extract meaningful ideas about teaching the concept of public citizen lawyering across the curriculum, integrating professionalism into doctrinally-focused as well as clinical courses, and teaching those elusive “other skills.” We will tackle some specific examples by working to apply the best practices to real-life experiences of participants.

Concurrent Sessions

The 1L Clinic: Michigan Law’s Live Client Experiential Learning During the First Year
Presenter:
Steve Gray, University of Michigan School of Law
Samir Hanna, University of Michigan School of Law, Clinical Teaching Fellow

With the ABA’s call for an expanded role of experiential learning, law schools are looking for ways to increase experience based learning offerings. For the past 3 years Michigan Law has offered an elective live client clinical course to 2nd semester 1Ls. In this discussion-based presentation, we will explore the formation and delivery of the course as well as lessons learned from teaching this unique clinical course.

Looking Outside the Clinic to Teach Social Justice and Inspire Future Lawyers
Presenter:
Wendy Vaughn, Northern Illinois University College of Law Colleen Boraca, Northern Illinois University College of Law Spencer Rand, Temple University Beasley School of Law

Multiple challenges face law schools in light of current economic and political landscapes. More pressure exists to graduate “practice-ready” attorneys who have the necessary skills to hit the ground running. Law-school based clinics and externships are tasked with instilling in students the importance of access to justice for all socioeconomic levels and inculcating values of professionalism and ethical lawyering. However, most clinicians find it challenging to comprehensively teach the necessary substantive law and skills training throughout a semester of clinic.

Students are clamoring for social justice opportunities to impact the world around them. Law schools have ongoing opportunities to create and revitalize their curriculum to prepare students to meet these challenges. Experiential legal educators are uniquely qualified to add value to the traditional law school curriculum through the development of doctrinal courses and seminars which address social justice issues, while exploring topics such as professionalism and the role of lawyers in a civil society.

Experiential legal educators have expertise in skills training, clinical teaching techniques, and specialized knowledge of social programs and policies impacting individuals who have been historically marginalized, are living in poverty, or are subsisting on minimum wage. Consequently, experiential legal educators are in a unique position to integrate experiential teaching in doctrinal courses, such as Poverty Law. While doctrinal courses differ from clinics/externships, both types of courses can complement each other and prepare students to become more socially just and engaged in their communities.

This session will accomplish the following: • Examine benefits/challenges of experiential educators teaching Poverty Law; • Discuss how a Poverty Law course could be used to reframe law through a social justice lens (for example, focus on the rights of someone being evicted versus the eviction process as taught in Property, challenges faced by unrepresented litigants in Family Law, etc.); • Assess how experiential components can be incorporated in Poverty Law through connections to law school clinics and community agencies as well as in partnership with other doctrinal faculty; and • Emphasize how students will learn the role of “citizen lawyers” in society.

Participants will receive sample syllabi from Poverty Law courses previously taught.

Brief Service Fairs: Identifying Learning Goals and Navigating Ethical Challenges
Presenters:
Gillian Chadwick, Washburn University School of Law
Michelle Ewert, Washburn University School of Law

With increasing need for free legal services and pressure from administrators and funders to raise the profile of law school clinics in the community, more and more clinical programs are participating in one-day, limited scope representation and brief service fairs or community law “clinics.” Whether woven into the curriculum of a traditional legal clinic or offered as a stand-alone experiential learning module, these events pose both opportunities and challenges for the clinician. In this session, participants will consider learning goals of brief-service fairs and identify ethical challenges that can arise in the brief services delivery context, including issues relating to conflicts of interest, student competence and supervision, and confidentiality. Participants will plan ways to both respond to challenges if they do arise and also prevent such problems from arising in the first place.

Using “Why-Storming” to Navigate Clinical Transitions
Presenters:
John Allen, University of Iowa College of Law
Bram Elias, University of Iowa College of Law
Alison Guernsey, University of Iowa College of Law
Emily Hughes, University of Iowa College of Law
Daria Fisher Page, University of Iowa College of Law
June Tai, University of Iowa College of Law

The Iowa law school clinical law program is undergoing an exciting transition. We will use our workshop to brainstorm with our Midwest colleagues while we navigate forward, viewing our own situation as a case study for how to think through clinical transitions more generally. We will begin our session by outlining—in lightning bolt fashion (about 12 minutes total, with a 2-minute description per person)—how our single clinical law firm model works and how we are folding two new practice areas into our firm: Alison Guernsey is starting a federal criminal practice and Daria Fisher Page is creating an organizational representation and transactional practice. Together with these new practice areas, Bram Elias is re-envisioning our clinic’s long-standing immigration practice and John Allen, who leads the general civil practice, is a guiding force helping us understand the deliberate and not-so-deliberate choices that have brought us to where we are today. At the same time, we have new leadership in areas that dovetail with our clinical law firm: June Tai directs our field placement program, and Emily Hughes directs our hybrid criminal defense clinic in state court. These are exciting times at Iowa law, and they give us much to discuss. After initial descriptions to set the scene, we will pose focused questions we would like to consider together. We will then move into a hands-on exercise called “why-storming,” a tool you can use in your own clinics, and we will end by debriefing together as a group. Come join us to learn what why-storming is and how it works, to hear some new ideas that might resonate with your own clinics, and to help us think critically about where our clinical law program is headed---and why.

Beyond the Traditional Client/Attorney Paradigm: Modeling Professional Responsibility in an Increasingly Complex Ethical World; Guidance for Clinicians and Law Students Providing Cause-Driven Legal Services
Presenters:
Liz Ryan Cole, Vermont Law School
Jeannette Eicks, Vermont Law School
Kate Evans, University of Idaho College of Law
Jeannie Oliver, Vermont Law School

Faced with increased calls for assistance and diminishing funding opportunities, law school clinics are exploring innovative ways to deliver cause-driven legal services to reach a far greater number of persons than may be possible through the traditional direct representation model of lawyering. Clinics are working in “collaboration” or “partnership” with entities, non-profits and other organizations who have no lawyers, to develop resources including legal guides and documents for use by a targeted (by the entity) sector of society, with whom the clinic has no formal or direct relationship. Increasingly, those products are delivered to members of the “targeted” groups, using legal technology which “stands in” as the attorney, resulting in legal agreements based on the user’s particular circu mstances.

While such non-traditional approaches may go some way toward addressing the “access to justice” problem, they also give rise to complex legal ethics scenarios not adequately addressed by the Model Rules of Professional Conduct. In non-traditional context it can be more difficult to identify who is the client and therefore to whom one’s ethical duties are owed, conflicts of interest may arise more frequently, and clinicians and their students must navigate the notoriously grey zone associated with the unauthorized practice of law. At the same time, representing potentially unpopular causes may make clinics more vulnerable to professional conduct complaints by persons and organizations seeking to undermine the clinic’s work. In this environment, clinicians face an extremely challenging role practicing ethically themselves, and modeling professional responsibility for their students. This presentation will help participants identify some of the issues, share lessons learnt and offer guidance for clinicians and their students delivering cause-driven legal services beyond the traditional client/att orney paradigm.

Assessing Reflective Practice: Do We Have Consensus?
Presenters:
Meg Reuter, University of Missouri – Kansas City
Jodi Balsam, Brooklyn Law School

Reflection is one of the critical precursors to becoming a self-propelled learner. Indeed one of the hallmarks of experiential pedagogy (clinics and externships) is to guide the students in reflection about the nature of the lawyering work in which they are engaged. The skill is not personality dependent, but is teachable. It is elemental to client-centered lawyering, to the pursuit of social justice goals, to the development of professional values, to personal growth, among other things. Our goal is to create an assessment tool that reliably assesses students’ abilities regarding reflective writing as a competency and to test the rubric with a broad array of faculty across many types of courses. We hope we can achieve these goals sufficiently well to meet the needs of law schools wishing to include reflection among their institutional learning outcomes. In this session we will present a rubric for Reflective Writing and engage audience members to test the rubric against a set of sample essays.

Using a Skills Self-Assessment to Measure Competency in Analysis Skills and Practical Skills
Presenter:
Wanda M. Temm, University of Missouri – Kansas City School of Law

Law schools are scrambling to fulfill the ABA’s directive for each student to have six hours of experiential credit. While the course must be primarily experiential in nature, the course must also “integrate doctrine, theory, skills, and legal ethics, and engage students in performance of . . . professional skills . . . and provide opportunities for self-evaluation.” ABA Standard 303(a)(3). Experiential courses do not occur in a vacuum. Students must be grounded in the doctrine and have the analysis skills to apply the law to their client’s facts.

The opportunities for self-evaluation criterion in Standard 303(a)(3) are not defined or pre-determined. This presentation will examine a Key Skills Self-Assessment Tool that provides a means for students to assess not only their interviewing, negotiating, trial advocacy skills, and other practical skills; but also their analysis, case interpretation, enacted law interpretation, research, and wr iting skills.

“Face” the Facts – Posting Can be a Perilous to Professionalism for Law Students, Lawyers and Judges: Just be NICE
Presenter:
Phyllis Williams Kotey, Florida International University College of Law

The ubiquitous use of social media or social networking has changed the blueprint for legal networking and social networking for law students, lawyers and judges. Externships and field placements create the platform exposing the law student, lawyer and judge as public citizens engaging in social networking. A single post, on a single subject, from a single place, can obfuscate the demarcation between personal and professional networking. Social networking provides immediacy, accessibility and a perceived cloak of anonymity to a vast audience. Once released in the digital domain for public consumption, the information can never be recovered or re-captured completely. It seems as easy as 1-2-3 to see it, think it and post it. Professionalism in this digital age can be challenging when maintaining high standards. Justice dictates that “beginning in law school and continuing throughout the legal profession, education, awareness and guidelines are necessary to illustrate to the legal community the benefits as well as the risks of venturing into or embracing social networking. For some it boils down to the old adage that “if you can’t say something nice, don’t say nothing at all.” The acronym NICE represents a strategy for deciding whether and how to engage social media in posting a comment or photograph. This presentation will offer experiential opportunities to teach across the learning experiences of law students, lawyers and judges who have faced ethical scrutiny for social networking activity.

Contesting and Disrupting Racial Narratives in Pedagogy and Practice
Presenters:
Danielle Jefferis, University of Denver Sturm College of Law
Renee Hatcher, John Marshall Law School
Brendan D. Roediger, St. Louis University School of Law

This session will address the challenges of confronting the racial narratives imposed on our clinical clients by courts, the executive or legislative branches, and other institutions. Utilizing specific case and project examples, it will explore the ways in which, as lawyers, we feel a tension between the pull of adopting the politics of respectability and of assimilation to effectively advocate for clients in litigation and transactional practice, and the push of challenging and disrupting dominant — and often racist or otherwise biased — narratives. The session will offer suggestions for combatting these narratives and reframing the underlying political questions. The session will also explore methods for examining these tensions with students by placing cases within broader political cont exts.

Recognizing the Assets and Closing the Gaps in Underserved Communities Through Client-Centered Lawyering
Presenters:
Janet Thompson Jackson, Washburn University School of Law
John Francis, Washburn University School of Law

Communities are often judged by what they don’t have, by the services that are not provided, and by the perceived deficiencies of the neighborhood and its inhabitants. This session will turn the dialogue about underserved communities on its head by exploring ways for clinics to go into local communities and connect with leaders and residents in order to determine their perceptions of the assets and the gaps in the community, including populations that do not receive adequate legal assistance. Examples of such populations may be persons with mental health concerns, undercapitalized small business owners, Veterans with criminal records or immigrants without legal st atus.

The presenters, John Francis and Janet Thompson Jackson, will share a project they have developed that encourages clinic interns to identify the legal and non-legal resources and gaps in communities in a way that prioritizes the needs and desires of the community and its residents, who are also potential clients. This client-centered lawyering approach truly meets the client where he or she is -- in their community -- and gives the intern a better understanding of the client’s environment, motivations, and challenges.

Leveraging Technology for Administrative Efficiency in Externships
Presenter:
Lauren Donald, University of Tulsa School of Law

The rise of digital technology has educators and administrators looking at how we can embrace these resources both for our own efficiency (and sanity) and enhance student experience. Whether you are using internet databases or cloud services to engage students and improve learning outcomes or to just make the best use of your own time, join non-tech savvy presenters as they share how they overcame digital incompetency to benefit their programs. We will discuss various platforms used to navigate the student/faculty/supervisor components of field placement programs and how these tools can help manage ABA requirements.

The Tenant Assistance Project: A Collaboration between Law School, Courts, and Community
Presenter:
Jennifer S. Prusak, Indiana University Maurer School of Law

As a response to sharply declining state and local resources for people facing eviction and eminent homelessness in southern Indiana, and in response to law students’ increased demands for quality experiential education opportunities, the Indiana University Maurer School of Law, in collaboration with the Monroe Circuit Court, created the Tenant Assistance Project (or, “TAP”). TAP’s law student volunteers – most of whom are in their first year – spend roughly two hours per week meeting with pro se tenants the morning of their eviction hearings. Under the direct supervision of a faculty member these students interview and counsel their clients and negotiate settlement terms with landlords. In many cases, TAP volunteers are able to delay or even prevent a total loss of their clients’ housing.

In the time since TAP was launched it has become a unique asset to the low-income clients who rely upon its services, Monroe County public interest attorneys, and our local court system. It has also enabled the law school – by using the court’s existing infrastructure – to provide TAP volunteers with invaluable client and courtroom experience early in their legal careers.

During this presentation we will discuss TAP’s creation and history, the unique skills law students gain from their involvement in the project, and TAP’s replicability at other law schools that might be impacted by strained resources for experiential education.

Teaching Millennials
Presenter:
Center for Teaching Excellence, University of Kansas

Proposal and additional presenter information forthcoming.

Spotlight on Teaching Sessions

Partnerships in Impact Litigation: Navigating Collaborations in the Big Case
Presenter:
John J. Ammann, St. Louis University School of Law

Law school clinics have always been leaders in bringing impact litigation, including class actions, to effect change in society. In many instances, clinics partner with legal aid offices, private law firms, and national nonprofit legal organizations to bring such cases. While effective in achieving results, these partnerships bring with them difficulties related to assignments of work, control of the litigation, the proper role for law students, division of attorney fees, among others.

This Spotlight will cover solutions to these issues from based upon 40 years of experience in such cases handled by the Saint Louis University Legal Clinic.

Team Building: How to help Team Members Collaborate Effectively
Presenters:
Jean Phillips, University of Kansas School of Law
Beth Cateforis, University of Kansas
Alice Craig, University of Kanas

From time to time team members have difficulty working together. This exercise helps students visualize the strengths and traits of each team member’s personality. Once students understand their partners, and their own, personality traits, they can work together more effectively.

Additional Spotlight on Teaching Proposals will be added as they are received. Presenters have until Sept 15 to submit proposals.

Accommodations

Room blocks have been reserved at the following hotels. Book by September 12 and mention KU Law to receive the group rate.

DoubleTree by Hilton Lawrence
200 McDonald Dr. | Lawrence, KS 66044
Book online | $109 / night

The Eldridge
701 Massachusetts St. | Lawrence, KS 66044 | 800-527-0909
$125 / night (Thurs), $169 / night (Fri & Sat)

The Oread
1200 Oread Ave. | Lawrence, KS 66044 | 877-263-6347
$125 / night (Thurs), $159 or $179 / night (Fri & Sat, price varies according to room type)

TownePlace Suites Marriott
900 New Hampshire | Lawrence, KS 66044 | 785-842-8800
Book online | $139 / night

Lawrence is located approximately 50 miles west of Kansas City International airport (MCI). Several companies provide airport shuttle transportation. The cost can run from $60-$100. Once arriving in Lawrence, Taxi, Uber, and Lyft services are options for transportation to campus and around Lawrence, but can vary in their availability and pricing at peak times.

We strongly recommend attendees rent a car and share rides whenever possible. Complimentary on-campus parking will be available during conference sessions, and some of the hotels provide free parking. Please check with hotel when making your reservation.

For those interested in airport shuttle transportation, the following companies provide shuttle service between MCI and Lawrence.

Ground Transportation Services: 888-467-3729
Better Alternative Transportation Services: 913-634-5484 | reservations@kcibats.com
Five Guys Transportation: 816-891-9999

We are delighted that you are joining us for the 2017 Midwest Clinical Conference. We hope you’ll take some time to explore our city and campus and find out why we’re consistently ranked among the best college towns in the country.

Visiting Campus
KU Campus Map
Lawrence Visitors Guide
Unmistakably Lawrence

The conference is made possible, in part, through the support of the AALS Section on Clinical Legal Education and by CLEA, the Clinical Legal Education Association.


Questions?

Jean Phillips
Director, Clinical Programs
Clinical Professor of Law
785-864-5571
phillips@ku.edu

Cancellation Policy
All cancellations received by September 29 will be refunded 100 percent. No refunds will be allowed after that time.

Accommodations
We accommodate persons with disabilities. Please submit your request no later than October 4 to cmai@ku.edu or 785-864-9208 TTY: 711.

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