Law alumni, faculty honored for achievements, service, careers

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

The Hon. Julie Robinson is inducted into the KU Women's Hall of Fame, April 7,2015LAWRENCE — Twenty women with ties to the University of Kansas were honored April 7 during the 2015 Women’s Recognition Banquet hosted by the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity.

Event organizers inducted six women into the KU Women’s Hall of Fame as well as presented honors to a number of outstanding students, faculty and staff at KU. 

“KU has such a rich history of women who lead and make our community and our world a better place,” said Kathy Rose-Mockry, director of the Emily Taylor Center. “It’s a privilege to honor these individuals and add to this growing legacy of involvement and achievement.”

The Women’s Hall of Fame has honored more than 200 exemplary KU alumnae, faculty and staff women since 1970. It recognizes those who through their significant contributions and achievements, overall effect and outstanding character, serve as role models for students as career women and community leaders.

The Hall of Fame is on the fifth floor of the Kansas Union. A complete list of Women’s Hall of Fame inductees and their accomplishments is available online. In addition to the inductees, 14 women were honored as recipients of 11 different awards.

The Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity provides leadership and advocacy in promoting gender equity and challenging gender-related barriers that impede full access and inclusion. The center raises awareness of critical issues, provides opportunities to translate awareness into action and empowers individuals to advocate for themselves and others.

About this year’s inductees and honorees recipients:

Women’s Hall of Fame inductees      

Ann M. Brill, doctorate, dean of the William Allen White School of Journalism & Mass Communications.

Brill joined the journalism school in 2000 and became dean in 2004.  Brill also serves as the president of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication (ASJMC), in addition to taking many other national leadership roles.

The school has flourished under her leadership and has received numerous grants from national foundations. She initiated significant curriculum revision for the school and oversaw the launch of its first doctoral program. Brill is dedicated to the students and has been extremely successful in raising support for the school.  She has created and endowed multiple new scholarships and awards, which greatly benefit the students, the school and the university. Her peers and colleagues describe Dean Brill as visionary.

Connie Burk, 1990 KU alumna, activist and author, NW Network of Bisexual, Trans, Lesbian and Gay Survivors of Abuse

Burk’s career of advocacy and activism began while she was studying at KU. As a student on campus, Burk was a member of many organizations — such as the February Daughters and Students Against Violence Against Women — and fought for progressive change. This activism spurred Burk to work for Women’s Transitional Care Services (now the Willow Domestic Violence Center in Lawrence), where she eventually became co-director. Under her leadership, the center expanded from sheltering survivors to raising awareness and educating the community about domestic violence. Burk also served as vice president of the Kansas Coalition Against Domestic Violence.

In 1997, Burk moved to Seattle to direct the NW Network of Bisexual, Trans, Lesbian and Gay Survivors of Abuse (The NW Network). Since then, Burk’s vision, focus and optimism has led the NW Network to new heights. With her guidance, the network established the National LGBT Training & Technical Assistance Initiative and the National Q&A Institute. In addition to her job as the executive director of the network, Burk also is executive producer of the award-winning documentary “A Lot Like You” and co-author of the book “Trauma Stewardship: An Everyday Guide to Caring for Self While Caring for Others.” 

The Hon. Karen Mitchell Humphreys, 1970 and 1973 KU alumna, juris doctor, U.S. magistrate judge

As an undergraduate, Karen Mitchell Humphreys was an honors student. She was inducted into both CWENS and Mortar Board as well as being chosen as the outstanding woman of her sorority. She was one of only 12 women admitted to the School of Law in 1970.

In 1978, Humphreys was appointed to the position of district judge for the 18th Judicial District in Sedgwick County. She remained in this position until 1993, when she was appointed as U.S. magistrate judge. KU’s Emily Taylor was on the selection committee for Humphreys’ appointment. Humphreys was the first woman to serve in this position. From 2003 to 2013, Humphreys was designated as the chief magistrate judge and led other federal magistrate judges in the area. 

In this position, Humphreys led an effort to create a specialty court, known as KAN-Trac. This program, which assists felony offenders re-entering the community, has been extremely successful. Humphreys has been referred to as the “human glue” which holds the program together. In recognition of her work on KAN-Trac and other programs, she has received many awards from the Kansas Women Attorneys Association, the Wichita Women’s Association, the Kansas Bar Association and the Wichita Bar Association.

Humphreys retired in January after more than 20 years of service to Kansas and more than 40 years in the field. 

Barbara P. Lukert, 1956 and 1960 KU alumna, M.D., professor of medicine emerita, endocrinology and metabolism, KU Medical Center

Dr. Lukert’s career at the KU Medical Center spans more than five decades, beginning with her residency in 1961. Since joining the Department of Medicine faculty in 1965, Lukert has served as the Mary F. Roberts Distinguished Chair in Nutrition, the director of the Osteoporosis Clinic, the Metabolic Laboratory and as the medical director of the Medicine Outpatient Clinic. She has lead or co-authored 96 full-length manuscripts and written 11 books or book chapters, served on the Wyandotte County Medical Society, and she serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Dr. Lukert is a nationally recognized educator, scholar and researcher. Among her many awards are the Boy Frame Award for Excellence in the Field of Bone and Mineral Metabolism, the KU Chancellor’s Teaching Award in 1982, the School of Medicine Distinguished Alumnus award in 1990 and the Honorary Health Professions Alumnus Award in 1999. Dr. Lukert is also the namesake of the Lukert Academic Society.

The Hon. Julie A.  Robinson, 1978 and 1981 KU alumna, juris doctor, U.S. district judge, District of Kansas

President George W. Bush appointed Robinson as the U.S. district judge for Kansas in 2001. A trailblazer in her field, Robinson is the first African-American woman to be appointed to this position. Robinson has served as a U.S. bankruptcy judge in the District of Kansas, a judge on the 10th Circuit Bankruptcy Appellate Panel and an assistant U.S. Attorney in the District of Kansas. 

Robinson has received numerous awards for her work, including commendations from the Secret Service, the Kansas Dr. M.L. King Jr. Memorial Committee’s Women of Distinction Award, the Baker University Trustee Medallion for Distinguished Public Service Award and the National Bar Association’s Wiley A. Branton Symposium Award. Before her current appointment, Robinson taught trial practice courses at KU. She also has served on the KU School of Law Board of Governors as president and on various committees.

Rosemarie T.  Truglio, doctorate, 1988 and 1990 KU alumna, senior vice president of global curriculum and content, Sesame Workshop

Truglio joined Sesame Workshop in 1997 as the vice president of education and research for Children’s Television Workshop, now known as Sesame Workshop.  In her current role, she is responsible for the development of the curriculum shown on "Sesame Street" and oversees all of the educational research for the show.  Truglio and her team work to enhance the educational and entertainment content of the show. She has written numerous articles, presented her work at international conferences and is the co-editor of ­“G is for Growing: Thirty Years of Research on Children and 'Sesame Street.'”

Truglio’s leadership of the Sesame Workshop creates an incredible legacy. Research has shown that high school students who watched the program when they were in preschool receive better grades in their classes and read more books than the average student.  Truglio, who was only 20 when she began graduate school at KU, has received the Annenberg Public Policy Award for her innovative development process.

Danica Hoose receives the 2015 Outstanding Woman Student in Community Service Award.2015 Award Honorees 

Jo Hardesty, juris doctor, Outstanding Woman Staff Member Award

Hardesty currently serves as the director & managing attorney for KU’s Legal Services for Students (LSS). She has been with LSS for 35 years and has served as director for 29 years. In her time with LSS, Hardesty has demonstrated exemplary passion and leadership. Not only is she dedicated to the office’s mission of providing KU students with legal services and workshops, but she continues to inspire and mentor those around her, both students and colleagues. In addition to her work with KU, Hardesty also has been recognized for her work with the National Legal Aid & Defender Association for her service to the legal community and her commitment to social justice and equality, as well as her work with the IRS’ low-income taxpayer clinic program.

The award honors a female unclassified or classified staff member who, through outstanding work performance, has contributed to the academic and personal growth of KU students.

Danica Hoose, Outstanding Woman Student in Community Service Award

Hoose is a junior studying accounting and economics and a graduate of Parsons High School. She is a senator in KU Student Senate, works in the Office of the Provost and serves as the president for Omega Phi Alpha, KU’s only service sorority. She was elected president of her sorority after only one year as an active member, and the sorority has been very active under her leadership. 

The award honors a woman student who has made outstanding contributions to off-campus organizations or agencies.

Kellyann Jones-Jamtgaard, Outstanding Woman Student in Leadership Award

Jones-Jamtgaard is a doctoral student at the KU Medical Center and graduate of Duke University. She is president of Students Educating and Advocating for Diversity, vice president of the Student Governing Council and former president of Graduate Student Council. In addition she is involved in creating and collaborating on numerous projects and groups at KU. Jones-Jamtgaard also spearheaded the creation of the KUMC Childbirth Accommodation Policy, which is now used as a template at universities across the state. 

The award honors a woman student who has demonstrated outstanding leadership skills by taking an active role in campus or community organizations, developing a new project or addressing a current need.

Sharmin Kader, Outstanding International Woman Student Award

Kader is a doctoral candidate from Bangladesh studying architecture health & wellness with a focus on gerontology. She received her master's degree from Texas A&M University and her bachelor's degree from Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology. Through her short career, Kader has already earned an international reputation for her academic and professional work. Most recently she received the International Fellowship by the American Association of University Women and the American Institute of Architects’ Arthur Tuttle Jr. Graduate Fellowship in Health Facility Planning and Design. She also presented at the Capitol Research Summit in 2014. Kader served as the founding president of the Bangladesh Student Association at KU, developing community support systems and organizing events in the area. In this role and in her personal life, Kader has served as a mentor and inspiration to many students.

The award honors an international woman student who has demonstrated academic achievement and has made a contribution to the campus and/or community through her involvement.

Jennifer Marcinkowski, Outstanding Non-Traditional Woman Student Award

Marcinkowski is a senior majoring in women, gender, and sexuality studies with a minor in history. She received her G.E.D. in 2001. Marcinkowski has faced many obstacles in her path to receive her degree, but she has persevered and will graduate this spring. Marcinkowski works as an accommodation specialist for the university and serves as the president of AbleHawks and Allies. AbleHawks is a student group dedicated to raising awareness, advocating for accessibility and promoting disability as multicultural issue. Marcinkowski is a passionate advocate and an effective leader. Through her work and her leadership of AbleHawks, KU has become a better place. 

The award honors a nontraditional woman student who has demonstrated academic achievement and has made a contribution to the campus and/or community through her involvement.

Erin McHale, Marlesa & Hannalesa Roney Student Success Mentor Award

McHale is a second-year graduate student at KU pursuing a master’s degree in higher education administration. She is a graduate of Iowa State University. McHale is the higher education graduate assistant for the Student Involvement and Leadership Center.

In her two years at the university, McHale has had an effect on the greek community and the campus community as a whole. She has served on numerous committees, developed programs, taught classes and facilitated retreats. She has been credited with showing passion and care for the students she serves.  McHale has demonstrated noteworthy dedication to sexual violence prevention and education. She has served on the Title IX roundtable, worked with the greek sexual assault task force and developed a program focused on the effects of overconsumption of alcohol and sexual violence. 

The award recognizes a woman graduate or undergraduate student who has contributed to the success of another student.

Shannon Portillo, doctorate, Kathleen McCluskey-Fawcett Woman Mentoring Women Award.           

Portillo currently serves as an assistant professor and the undergraduate program coordinator for the School of Public Affairs and Administration. Women who’ve learned with, through and alongside Portillo point out that she teaches not just directly, but also by example. She is credited with showing deep care for her students through her accessibility and willingness to offer career advice and guidance. Moreover she offers inspiration and encouragement to overcome self-doubts and build confidence among her students.

The award honors a woman student, staff, or faculty member who has demonstrated outstanding commitment to the support and mentoring of women at KU.

Jessie Pringle, Outstanding Woman Student in Partnership Award

Pringle is a junior majoring in history and environmental studies and graduate of Chanute High School.In addition to her academics, Pringle is involved in a sorority and has served as an orientation assistant and as the chairperson for the Finance Committee of KU Student Senate. Within Student Senate, Pringle has impressed her peers and mentors with her ability to lead effectively and to bring people to the table.

The award honors a woman student who has made outstanding contributions to students through her collaborative work and interactions with campus departments, services or organizations.

Monica Saha, Sally Mason Woman Student in Science Award

Saha is a second-year pharmacy student at KU, set to graduate in May 2017. She is a graduate of Blue Valley Northwest High School. Saha co-authored an article titled “Loss of GluN2A-Containing NMDA Receptors Impairs Extra-dimensional Set-Shifting,” which was published in Genes, Brain and Behavior, a notable scientific journal. Saha recently received a travel award through the Harvard Medical School to present at the New England Science Symposium in April. Saha also works with Hawk Link tutoring, is on the executive board for Kappa Psi, the professional pharmaceutical fraternity, and writes for the University Daily Kansan.

The award honors a female undergraduate or graduate student in the sciences who has demonstrated academic excellence, involvement in campus activities, and leadership in her academic department.

Melanie Wilson, juris doctor, Outstanding Woman Educator Award

Wilson currently serves as a professor and as the associate dean for academic affairs for the School of Law. An expert in her field, Wilson has served as an assistant attorney general in Georgia, co-authored four books and many scholarly articles, and she has won numerous awards and commendations for both her work as an attorney and as a professor. In addition to her other roles, Wilson is also the director of diversity and inclusion for the law school. Wilson continues to make sure students feel safe and empowered in every space. Wilson was recently selected to become the next dean of the University of Tennessee College of Law. 

The award honors a female professor, instructor, or student teaching assistant who, through outstanding teaching skills, has contributed to the academic and personal growth of KU students.


Four students were selected to receive the Alma Poehler Brook Memorial Award. The award honors Brook, who served as director of Corbin Hall from 1929 to 1944. Upon her death, friends established the Brook Memorial Fund to recognize worthy and deserving students living at Gertrude Sellards Pearson and Corbin Hall. Hall staff selected these recipients:

Nicole Johnson, sophomore in human biology from Lenexa

Rebekah Navarro, freshman, Holton

Marianne Rogers, freshman, Albuquerque

Victoria Peterson, freshman, Olathe.

Law alumna and former professor elected to KU Endowment board

Friday, September 26, 2014

LAWRENCE — KU Endowment’s Board of Trustees elected The Hon. Deanell Reece Tacha as new board chair and Charles E. Heath as vice chair, and elected five other University of Kansas alumni as trustees at today’s annual meeting of the association’s Board of Trustees. Tacha, the first woman to chair the board, succeeds A. Drue Jennings, of Prairie Village, who served four one-year terms.

The new trustees are Steve Lightstone, Kansas City, Missouri; Cathy Reinhardt, Lawrence; Annette Rieger, Seattle; Elizabeth “Beth” Stella, Lawrence; and Thomas Walsh, Leawood.

The Hon. Deanell Reece Tacha, of Lawrence and Malibu, California, graduated from KU in 1968 with a bachelor’s degree in American studies and earned a juris doctorate at the University of Michigan in 1971. Since 2011, she has been dean of the Pepperdine University School of Law. From 1985 to 2011, she served as a federal judge for the U.S. Court of Appeals, Tenth Circuit, and was chief judge from 2001 to 2007. Earlier, in 1974, she joined the KU School of Law faculty, becoming associate dean in 1977. In 1981, she was appointed KU’s vice chancellor for academic affairs, a position she held until 1985. She was elected to the KU Endowment Board of Trustees in 1992.

Charles E. Heath, of Lawrence, earned two degrees from KU — a bachelor’s in business in 1964 and a master’s in business administration in 1966. He is an independent director and compliance committee chair for Tortoise Capital Advisors’ closed-end funds. He also serves on the boards of directors for Corridor Energy and DCCCA. From 1971 until his retirement in 1999, he was employed by Employers Reinsurance Corporation, where he served from 1989 to 1999 as chief investment officer. He is a past president of the Kansas City Society of Financial Analysts and attained the Chartered Financial Analyst designation in 1974. He was elected to the KU Endowment Board of Trustees in 2006.

Steve Lightstone earned a bachelor’s degree in industrial management in 1967 and a master’s degree in finance in 1970, both from KU. His wife, Terry, earned a bachelor’s degree in education from KU in 1968. Steve is a managing director with CC Capital Advisors, an investment bank and a division of Country Club Bank. He serves on the Board of the KU Medical Center Research Institute and the medical center’s Far Above campaign committee. He has served on the KU School of Business Board of Advisors, the KU academic medical center’s Advancement Board, the Kansas City chapter of the KU Alumni Association and the KU Alumni Association Honors Program, among others. Steve is a life member of the Chancellors Club and the Alumni Association.

Cathy A. Reinhardt graduated from KU in 1980 with a bachelor’s degree in history and in 1983 with a J.D. She and her husband, Norman St. Laurent, live in Lawrence. Cathy is president of Reinhardt Financial Services Inc. She is a past member of the KU Law Alumni Board of Governors. She is a member of the Elizabeth Watkins Society and a life member of the Chancellors Club and the Alumni Association.

Annette Rieger graduated from KU in 1967 with a bachelor’s degree in sociology and social work. Her husband, Roger, earned a bachelor’s in business in 1967; they live in Seattle. Annette and Roger are owners of a private family foundation, the Tudor Foundation, which creates programs focusing on mentoring, counseling and financial support of low-income, inner-city students. Annette worked in Protective Services for Children. She was named to the KU Women’s Hall of Fame in 2006. She is a former member of the Women Philanthropists for KU Advisory Board and is a life member of the Chancellors Club and the KU Alumni Association.

M. Elizabeth (Beth) Stella graduated from KU in 1969 with a bachelor’s degree in piano. She also earned master’s degrees in piano and in human development and family life and a doctorate in developmental and child psychology. Beth’s husband, Valentino (Val), is a distinguished professor in the School of Pharmacy. Beth retired as an associate research scientist at KU in 1998 and is a community volunteer. She serves on the Hall Center Advisory Board and on the center’s Far Above campaign committee. She also served on the Women Philanthropists for KU Advisory Board. She is a life member of the Chancellors Club and the Alumni Association.

Thomas J. Walsh graduated from KU in 1980 with a bachelor’s degree in business administration. Tom and his wife, Teresa, live in Leawood and have three grown children, two of whom also are KU alumni. Tom is co-chairman of Silpada Designs Inc., a company co-founded by Teresa in 1997. He joined the Silpada Board of Directors in 2013 after the founding families reacquired the company from Avon. Tom is also a partner at Think Big Partners, and he has founded and developed several successful businesses, including Central Interchange and H2O Resources. Before that, he was part of the executive leadership team at Jack Henry & Associates for 14 years. Tom is a member of the KU academic medical center’s Advancement Board and a life member of the Chancellors Club and the Alumni Association.

KU Endowment is the independent, nonprofit organization serving as the official fundraising and fund-management organization for KU. Founded in 1891, KU Endowment was the first foundation of its kind at a U.S. public university.

Professorship honors former law faculty member

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

LAWRENCE — University of Kansas School of Law alumnus Art Piculell of Portland, Oregon, and his late wife, Dee, have made a $500,000 gift to establish a professorship honoring the late Professor Earl B. Shurtz, who taught at KU Law from 1955 to 1977.

Art said he appreciated the opportunity to spend time with Professor Shurtz.

“We would discuss the subjects of law and the subjects of life,” Art said. “He had a genuine concern for his students. For instance, if he saw you sitting in the library, he would come over and talk to you. That’s who he was.”

Art and Dee met at Emporia State University, where in 1959 they earned bachelor’s degrees, Dee in music education, Art in psychology and sociology. The couple married and moved to Wichita, where Art became a social worker with the Sedgwick County Board of Social Welfare and Dee was a grade school teacher. Later, they moved to Scott City, where Art was the county welfare director of both Scott and Wichita counties and Dee taught school. In 1962, they moved to Lawrence so that Art could attend law school. Dee taught grade school in Lawrence and served as president of the law wives’ club.

“We just basically are paying back for what we got,” Art said. “Dee and I were very fortunate to get our educations and to benefit from that.”

In 1965, after Art earned his law degree, the couple returned to western Kansas, where Art practiced law in Cimarron. In 1972, Art and Dee moved to Portland, Oregon, where Art was admitted to practice law in the state. In Portland, the couple developed residential communities and invested in commercial buildings in Oregon, Washington and Arizona through their companies, Homesite Development and the Piculell Group.

“I enjoyed practicing law, but I knew that wasn’t my bent in life,” Art said. “The benefits that I received from studying the law were applicable to the real estate businesses we ventured into.”

This is the second professorship Art and Dee Piculell established at the law school; in 2004, they created the J.B. Smith Distinguished Professor in Constitutional Law.

Stephen Mazza, dean of the School of Law, expressed appreciation for the gift.

“As so many of our graduates have, Art took the analytical skills he learned in law school and used them to gain success in an area outside of a traditional legal practice. His earlier gift to the law school was incredibly generous, and to follow that with another major gift speaks to his and Dee’s love for the school and their generosity,” Mazza said.

The gift counts toward Far Above: The Campaign for Kansas, the university’s $1.2 billion comprehensive fundraising campaign. Far Above seeks support to educate future leaders, advance medicine, accelerate discovery and drive economic growth to seize the opportunities of the future.

The campaign is managed by KU Endowment, the independent, nonprofit organization serving as the official fundraising and fund-management organization for KU. Founded in 1891, KU Endowment was the first foundation of its kind at a U.S. public university.

Law alumnus named director of School of Public Affairs and Administration

Thursday, June 12, 2014

LAWRENCE – The University of Kansas has named an alumnus who is a nationally recognized public administrator as the new director of its School of Public Affairs and Administration.

Reggie Robinson, who has held numerous leadership and advisory posts at the state and federal level, was selected to lead the top-ranked school after a nationwide search. As director, Robinson will return to the institution where he earned his law degree in 1987.

“I’m pleased to appoint an experienced administrator and dedicated public servant,” said Danny Anderson, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. “Reggie captivated those he met with his strategic view and knowledge of the public sector. KU is fortunate to attract a person with administrative talent and distinction in the field as a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration.”

Most recently, Robinson has been professor of law and director for the Center of Law and Government at Washburn University. He has also served as the president and CEO of the Kansas Board of Regents and chief of staff to the KU chancellor. He has served the federal government beginning as a White House fellow in 1993 and in a number of senior positions with the Department of Justice, including service as deputy associate attorney general of the United States. Robinson also served active duty in the Army.

“I am thoroughly pleased about this exciting opportunity to lead one of my alma mater's truly outstanding academic units,” Robinson said. “I am deeply grateful to the leadership of the university and the College for this opportunity. I can't wait to work with the distinguished set of colleagues – both faculty and staff – that await in the School of Public Affairs and Administration.”

Robinson has a strong record of public service focused on civil rights, juvenile justice and higher education policy. Throughout his career and volunteer experiences he has encouraged people with leadership capacity to step outside their own assumptions and perspectives, bridge different points of view, see common ground and help others see it as well.

“Reggie understands government and public service from the inside out. He knows how to move policy and institutions forward, often turning obstacles into opportunities. The school welcomes this experienced, perceptive and caring leader as our new director, and together we look forward to advancing teaching and research in the public service,” said Steven Maynard-Moody, professor in the school and chair of the search committee.

Robinson replaces Marilu Goodyear, who will step down after nine years as director. Goodyear has been appointed as the assistant vice chancellor for academic program development for the Edwards Campus and will continue to teach in the School of Public Affairs and Administration.

The School of Public Affairs and Administration is consistently ranked as the best graduate school in the nation in city management and urban policy, and it is among the top five graduate schools in the nation in public management administration (2013 U.S. News & World Report Best Graduate Schools).

The distinction reflects the school’s commitment to providing a top-notch master’s degree in public administration education to those who seek to manage at the local, city, county, state, national or international levels, or in the nonprofit sector. The MPA degree is offered at the Edwards and Lawrence campuses and in Topeka. The school is also currently celebrating the 10th anniversary of its undergraduate degree, which is available through the Edwards Campus. In addition, many of the school’s doctoral graduates are now professors at universities with renowned public administration departments.

Through its Public Management Center, the school provides award-winning professional development programs to the state and regional workforce: Kansas Certified Public Manager Program, Emerging Leaders Academy, Law Enforcement Leadership Academy, Supervisory Leadership Training, along with custom courses and annual training events, including the Inspiring Women in Public Administration Conference, National Forum for Black Public Administrators Executive Leadership Institute and the Kansas City / County Management Conference.

Law school honors top graduates for scholarship, leadership and service

Friday, May 23, 2014

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas School of Law honored Class of 2014 graduates at a hooding ceremony May 17. During the ceremony, seven students received awards for distinguishing themselves in scholarship, leadership and service to the law school and the community.

The recipients:

  • Xavier Andrews, Kansas City, Missouri, Justice Lloyd Kagey Leadership Award
  • David Barclay, Andover, Class of 1949 Leadership Award
  • Kate Marples, Lawrence and Dodge City, Samuel Mellinger Scholarship, Leadership and Service Award
  • Amanda Marshall, Goddard, Robert F. Bennett Award
  • Peter Montecuollo, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Walter Hiersteiner Outstanding Service Award
  • Whitney Novak, Shawnee, Faculty Award for Outstanding Scholastic Achievement
  • Jacob Wamego, Mayetta, Janean Meigs Memorial Award

Banner carrier Paul Cassat, Overland Park, was also recognized during the ceremony. The banner carrier is a student who has excelled academically and who carries the highest grade-point average by the end of the fall semester in the third year of law study.

The award winners were part of a class composed of 119 recipients of the Juris Doctor, five Doctor of Juridical Science graduates and two Master of Laws in American Legal Studies graduates.

Funds for the awards are managed by KU Endowment, the independent, nonprofit organization serving as the official fundraising and fund-management organization for KU. Founded in 1891, KU Endowment was the first foundation of its kind at a U.S. public university.

Student award recipients are listed below by hometown.

David Barclay

BUTLER COUNTY
Andover 
David Barclay received the Class of 1949 Leadership Award, given to the student who has contributed most significantly to the overall experience of students in Green Hall. Barclay revived the American Constitution Society chapter at KU Law and served as its president. He was a prestigious Shook, Hardy & Bacon Scholar, assisting students in the first-year class to develop sound study habits and strong analytical skills. Barclay was one of four finalists in the 2013 In-House Moot Court Competition and served on the Moot Court Council. He also served as one of two student members of the faculty Curriculum Reform Committee, helped legal writing students as a teaching assistant and was an articles editor for the Kansas Law Review. Barclay is the son of Joanne and Andrew Barclay and a graduate of Andover High School and KU.

Kate Marples

DOUGLAS AND FORD COUNTIES
Lawrence, Dodge City 
Kate Marples received the Samuel Mellinger Scholarship, Leadership and Service Award, given to the graduate who has most distinguished him or herself in the combined areas of scholarship, leadership and service. As symposium editor for the Kansas Law Review, Marples organized a sold-out conference on “Waters of the United States: Adapting Law for Degradation and Drought.” She served as the student director of the Paul E. Wilson Project for Innocence and Post-Conviction Remedies, a Dean’s Fellow and a Shook, Hardy & Bacon Scholar. A member of the Moot Court Council, Marples’ team advanced to the semi-final round of a national environmental law moot court competition. She served as a teaching assistant in the Lawyering Program and as a student member of both the faculty Curriculum Reform Committee and the Academic Committee. During law school, Marples volunteered at the Lawrence Homeless Shelter and through Family Promise. She also helped coach the KU Crew team. In April, she received a campuswide Sustainability Leadership Award. Marples has conducted all of this service to the law school and the community while maintaining an academic ranking in the top 10 percent of her class. Marples is the daughter of Doug and Jane Marples and a graduate of Dodge City High School and KU. 

Jacob Wamego

JACKSON COUNTY
From Mayetta 
Jacob Wamego received the Janean Meigs Memorial Award, given to the student who has demonstrated a caring spirit in service to the students of the law school or the community at large. Wamego was instrumental in rebuilding the Native American Law Students Association into a thriving organization. He served as president of the organization in both his second and third years, and he helped organize the 2013 Diversity in Law Banquet. He brought speakers of national prominence to KU Law to give presentations to students and played a substantial role in organizing and administering the Tribal Law and Government Center’s annual conference in 2012, 2013 and 2014 – including taking on a speaking role in 2013. Wamego competed in the 2014 National NALSA moot court competition, raised money to send NALSA members to Federal Bar Association Indian Law conferences and helped the law school in recruiting well-qualified Native American students. He was recently elected to serve in the National NALSA organization. Wamego is the son of Lisa Wamego and a graduate of Royal Valley High School and Washburn University.

Whitney Novak

JOHNSON COUNTY
From Shawnee 
Whitney Novak received the Faculty Award for Outstanding Scholastic Achievement, which goes to the graduating student selected by the faculty as having made the most significant contribution toward overall legal scholarship. She served as executive note and comment editor for the Kansas Law Review. Her note “Blood Over Bond? A Call to Define Kansas’s Requirements for Biological Fathers to Retain Parental Rights” was published in Volume 61. A member of the Moot Court Council, she was part of the team that received best brief honors in the 2013 In-House Moot Court Competition. She was a Shook, Hardy & Bacon Scholar, helping first-year students improve their study habits, analytical skills and test scores. Novak was among the students at the very top of the 2014 graduating class based on grade-point average. She is the daughter of Joe and Dena Novak and a graduate of Mill Valley High School and KU.

Amanda Marshall

SEDGWICK COUNTY
From Goddard 
Amanda Marshall received the Robert F. Bennett Award, recognizing a graduate whose undergraduate degree is from a Kansas university or college and who has demonstrated leadership qualities through public service. As symposium editor for the Kansas Journal of Law and Public Policy, Marshall organized a highly successful symposium titled “Preventing the Ghost Town: What Rural Communities Need to Do to Survive in the Modern Economy.” She brought nationally recognized speakers to KU Law, attracting a full house of attendees. She also served as a Westlaw representative and is a member of the Kansas Bar Association’s Diversity Committee. Marshall is the daughter of Doug and Sheryl Stanley and a graduate of Bishop Carroll High School and Newman University.

Xavier Andrews

MISSOURI
From Kansas City 
Xavier Andrews received the Justice Lloyd Kagey Leadership Award, given to the graduate who has most distinguished him or herself through leadership in the law school. Andrews served as president of the Black Law Students Association. In that position, he played a key role in organizing Thurgood Marshall Law Day, during which high school students from Kansas City traveled to the law school for a day of legal education and mentorship, and he directed the yearly BLSA Thanksgiving food drive for members of the Lawrence community who lack the means to enjoy a traditional Thanksgiving feast.  He served as a judge on KU’s Traffic Court and was the business manager for the Kansas Journal of Law and Public Policy. He was a member of the Moot Court Council. He served as an intern at the Johnson County District Attorney’s Office, where under proper supervision, he prosecuted criminal cases before juries. He recently accepted an offer to join the office on a permanent basis as an assistant district attorney. Andrews is the son of Felecia Andrews and a graduate of Hickman Mills High School and Missouri Western State University.

Peter Montecuollo

SOUTH DAKOTA
From Sioux Falls 
Peter Montecuollo received the Walter Hiersteiner Outstanding Service Award, given to the graduate whose service to his or her fellow students demonstrates the greatest promise for contribution to the legal profession and society. Montecuollo served as a teaching assistant in the legal writing program, providing both substantive help to first-year law students and general advice on sound writing and study habits, and as a mentor, helping many of his student peers prepare for job interviews, exams and with their scholarship for the Kansas Law Review. He served as a note and comment editor on the Law Review. His note, “Making the Best of an Imperfect World:  An Argument in Favor of Judicial Discretion to Reduce Section 1927 Sanction Awards,” was published in Volume 62. Montecuollo is the son of Larry and Dee Werner and a graduate of Lincoln Senior High School (Sioux Falls), Minnesota State University Moorhead and KU.

Trio of jurists to receive law school’s Distinguished Alumni Award

Tuesday, May 06, 2014

LAWRENCE — Three University of Kansas School of Law alumni with distinguished careers in the judiciary and public service are set to receive the school’s highest honor.

Retired Kansas Supreme Court Justice Edward Larson, Judge Mary Murguia of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit and Judge Julie Robinson of the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas will be honored with the law school’s Distinguished Alumni Award at an invitation-only ceremony Saturday, May 10, in Lawrence.

A veteran of the U.S. Air Force, Justice Edward Larson earned his KU law degree in 1960, then practiced law and served as a municipal judge in Hays. In 1987 he was appointed to the Kansas Court of Appeals and then tapped for the Kansas Supreme Court in 1995. He retired in 2002. In addition to his service on the bench, Larson served on the Kansas Board of Law Examiners, was president of the Kansas University Law Society, and served as a member of the Governor’s Committee on Children and Families and the Kansas Children’s Cabinet.

A former state and federal prosecutor, Judge Mary Murguia earned two bachelor’s degrees from KU in 1982 and her law degree in 1985. She began her legal career with the Wyandotte County District Attorney’s Office in Kansas City, Kansas. From 1990 to 2000, Murguia served in various prosecutorial and administrative roles in the District of Arizona U.S. Attorney’s Office and the Executive Office for United States Attorneys at the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. In 2000, President Clinton appointed Murguia a U.S. district judge for the District of Arizona. She was the first Latina on a federal bench for that district. In 2010, she was nominated to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit by President Obama. Murguia also served on KU Law’s Board of Governors and is a founding member of the law school’s Women’s Advisory Council.​

Judge Julie Robinson earned a bachelor’s in journalism at KU in 1978 and her law degree in 1981. Following law school, she clerked for Chief Bankruptcy Judge Benjamin E. Franklin and then served as an assistant U.S. attorney for 11 years, handling both civil litigation and criminal prosecutions. She served as a U.S. bankruptcy judge from 1994 to 2001, when she was appointed by President George W. Bush to the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas. Robinson was the first African-American woman to serve on that court. She is past-president of the KU Law Board of Governors and has taught Trial Advocacy as an adjunct professor at KU Law. Robinson is a trustee of the Saint Paul School of Theology, a fellow of the American Bar Foundation, a commissioner of the U.S. Supreme Court Fellow program and was recently appointed to the board of trustees of the American Inns of Court.

The Distinguished Alumni Award is presented annually to KU School of Law graduates who have distinguished themselves through exemplary service to the legal profession, their communities, the university, and the state or country. Since 1964, the school has honored 71 alumni “whose lives have benefited the community and whose noteworthy contributions throughout the year have brought honor to the School of Law.”

View previous Distinguished Alumni Award recipients on the law school’s website.

New recipients of the James Woods Green Medallion, named in honor of the law school’s first dean, will also be recognized at the ceremony. The school presents medallions to its major financial contributors. This year’s honorees include Terry Arthur, Class of 1969, and Virginia Thomas Arthur; Chevron Products Company; Mark M. Deatherage, Class of 1985; Fleeson, Gooing, Coulson & Kitch; David J. Gottlieb and Rita Sloan Gottlieb; Frederick B. Gould, Class of 1989, and Julie Pigott Gould; John W. Head and Lucia Orth Head; Harry H. Herington Jr., Class of 1993, and Cindy Herington; Leon and Lee T. Karelitz Trust; Kansas Women Attorneys Association;  Lucy E. Mason, Class of 1992, and Cris Sena; Madeleine M. McDonough, Class of 1990; Omer G. Voss Jr; Wagstaff & Cartmell LLP; Martha S. Warren, Class of 1987; and Perry D. Warren, Class of 1973, and Janet Beebe Warren.

Chancellor to present national science advocacy award to U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran, L'82

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

LAWRENCE — U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran will receive a national award for his support of science research at 9:30 a.m. Monday, April 14, at the Dole Institute of Politics at the University of Kansas.

Sen. Moran will receive the Champion of Science Award from the Science Coalition, a nonprofit organization of more than 50 of the nation’s top research universities, including KU. The award recognizes members of Congress for their support of science research conducted at universities and national labs across the country.

The senator will be presented the award by KU Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little on behalf of the Science Coalition. The chancellor and senator will be joined by a special guest, Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, who will deliver keynote remarks at the event.

"Senator Moran understands the importance of federal investment in research and development, and he has been a strong advocate for the value of university research and the benefits it has for science and the economy,” Gray-Little said. “He is deserving of this award, and we’re honored for the opportunity to present it to him here at KU.

“In addition, it’s a tremendous honor for us to welcome Dr. Collins,” she said. “The NIH is the largest biomedical research organization in the world and a strong supporter of KU research, so we’re delighted for the chance to host the director.”

Moran is the second Kansas lawmaker to receive the Champion of Science Award. Thirty-five current members of Congress have received the award. Examples of Moran’s support of scientific research are listed in his award nomination.

Moran is hosting Collins throughout the day to highlight biomedical and bioscience initiatives in Kansas. Prior to the award ceremony, the chancellor and Moran will host Collins at a presentation of Kansas’ NIH Institutional Development Award program, which is designed to broaden the geographic distribution of NIH support for biomedical research by fostering research in states that have historically been underrepresented in NIH research participation. Kansas universities that have been invited to participate in this presentation include KU, Emporia State University, Fort Hays State University, Haskell Indian Nations University, Kansas State University, Pittsburg State University, Wichita State University and Washburn University.

Following the award ceremony, Moran and Collins will travel to KU Medical Center to meet with various Medical Center officials.

The NIH is a major source of biomedical research funding at KU. In Fiscal Year 2013, there were 601 NIH-funded projects at KU, totaling $103 million in expenditures. The NIH is home to the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute on Aging, which have granted national designation to the KU Cancer Center and the KU Alzheimer’s Disease Center.

PUBLIC ACCESS: The award ceremony is open to the public, but seating is limited, and RSVPs are required. RSVP with Emma Cornish at 785-864-7100 or ecornish@ku.edu.

MEDIA ACCESS: Media are invited to cover the award ceremony. Moran, Collins and Gray-Little will be available for interviews following the event at 10:45 a.m. For details, contact Joe Monaco at 785-864-7100 or jmonaco@ku.edu.

In addition, Moran and Collins will be available to media at 1:30 p.m. in the Hemenway Life Sciences Innovation Building at the KU Medical Center. For details, contact Donna Peck at 913-588-5956 or dpeck@kumc.edu.

Judge Julie Robinson, L'81, to receive 2014 Pioneer Woman award

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

LAWRENCE – The Emily Taylor Center for Women and Gender Equity at the University of Kansas will host the annual Women’s Recognition Banquet at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 10, in the Kansas Union Ballroom. The program, which recognizes outstanding women in the Kansas community, will induct six new members to the KU Women’s Hall of Fame and honor one KU graduate with the Pioneer Woman award.

In addition to the Hall of Fame inductees and the Pioneer Award recipient, 15 women will receive annual awards designed for students, staff, faculty, and alumnae who have enriched and improved the campus and community through their service, teaching for involvement.

The women’s recognition program is made possible not only by the Emily Taylor center, but also by the Commission of the Status of Women and the KU Office of Diversity & Equity.

Faculty and staff being honored include Outstanding Woman Educator Florence Reed, assistant professor of applied behavioral science and director of the Performance Management Laboratory; Outstanding Woman Staff Member Amy Long, associate director of the Student Involvement & Leadership Center; and Florence Boldridge, director of diversity and women’s engineering programs in the School of Engineering, who will receive the Kathleen McCluskey-Fawcett Women Mentoring Women Award.

The 2014 Hall of Fame inductees include Dr. Kimberly Templeton, professor of orthopedic surgery; Barbara Timmermann, University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Medicinal Chemistry; the late Adele Hall, 2003 University of Kansas Honorary Alumna; Deborah Teeter, university director of the Office of Institutional Research and Planning; Neeli Bendapudi, dean of the KU School of Business; and Marily Harper Rhudy, principal, MHR consulting.

The 2014 Pioneer Woman award is received by the Honorable Julie Robinson, judge of the United States District Court for the District of Kansas. A KU School of Law graduate, Robinson was an Assistant U.S. Attorney for 10 years before being appointed to the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Kansas. After serving eight years, President George W. Bush appointed Robinson as the first African-American woman to serve on the United States District Court for the District of Kansas. While serving as Assistant U.S. Attorney she taught trial practice courses to KU law students and later served on the KU School of Law Board of Governors. In addition to her service to the University, Robinson is a Kansas Fellow of the American Bar Foundation and has served on several committees of the Kansas Bar Association. Robinson’s colleagues agree that she “is a woman leader who has carried the banner of the crimson and blue with the humility and the highest standard of leadership.”

KU has inducted outstanding leaders into its Women’s Hall of Fame since 1970. The Women’s Hall of Fame is located at the fifth floor of the Kansas Memorial Union. Additional details about the KU Hall of Fame Inductees are as follows:

Dr. Kimberly Templeton, professor, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center: Following a fellowship in musculoskeletal oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital, Templeton began her professional career as an assistant professor of orthopedic surgery at KU Medical Center. Templeton is the immediate past-president and was integral in the creation of the U.S. Bone and Joint Initiative Public Education Committee, which develops national education programs in areas of bone health and adolescent conditions. Templeton also worked with the Kansas Medical Society to create the Women Physicians Caucus, which provides a platform for women in medicine to learn from one another, network and grow in their profession. Templeton also is an at-large member for the National Board of Medical Practitioner and immediate past-president for the Kansas State Board of Healing Arts.

Barbara Timmermann, University Distinguished Professor, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, KU School of Pharmacy: In 1970, Timmermann received her bachelor's degree in biological sciences at the National University of Cordoba, Argentina. After moving to the United States, Timmerman completed her doctoral studies at the University of Texas-Austin in 1980. Timmermann joined the KU School of Pharmacy faculty as a distinguished professor and served as chair of the Department of Medicinal Chemistry from 2005 to 2012. She is currently the director of the NIH-funded Center for Cancer Experimental Therapeutics. She is internationally known and highly regarded for her research in bioprospecting and her commitment to social justice. Since coming to KU, Timmermann has brought in more than $20 million in research funding.

Adele Coryell Hall, philanthropist, 2003 Honorary Alumna. In 1977, after 24 years of committed service, Hall became the first woman president of the Heart of America United Way. Ten years later she created the Women’s Public Service Network with the help of community and business leaders to foster a forum for social issues affecting women. In 1999 she was one of 12 forward-thinking women who created The Central Exchange, a nonprofit organization for the personal and professional growth of women that fosters community service and business leadership by women. In 2003 she received the KU Distinguished Service Citation for her service to Kansas, her community and the university. Hall’s Family Foundation has donated millions of dollars to aid KU in the development of the Hall Center for the Humanities, KU Cancer Center and various campus buildings and programs.

Deborah Teeter, university director, KU Office of Institutional Research and Planning. Teeter graduated from KU in 1975 with a master's in business administration and soon after was named the director of the Office of Institutional Research and Planning. For the last 40 years Teeter has worked with university administrators to provide statistical tools for planning and educate about the usefulness of data in shaping departments. Her collaborative nature led to the growth of the Association of American Universities Data Exchange, a group that works to improve higher education through data and analysis. Mabel Rice, Distinguished Professor in the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing, said Teeter's contributions to the university “are out of sight of most people, but for those who have watched her in action, she is truly inspiring.”

Neeli Bendapudi, KU Dean and H.D. Price Professor of Business, School of Business: In 1987, Bendapudi received her master's of business administration and a bachelor's degree from Andhra University in India, then came to the United States to start her doctorate in marketing at KU. After teaching at Texas A&M and Ohio State University, Bendapudi returned to KU. In 2011, she was named the first female dean of the School of Business. Since 2011, Bendapudi raised more than $55 million for a new state-of-the-art business school, worked to instill social responsibility in business students by starting a program that pairs MBA students with Kansas nonprofit organizations and collaborated with university departments to increase the number of women in business. “The university is lucky to have such an articulate and enthusiastic representative,” said Ann Cudd, vice provost and dean of Undergraduate Studies.

Marily Harper Rhudy, principal, MHR Consulting: After graduating in 1972 from the KU School of Pharmacy, Rhudy co-owned and operated three Topeka pharmacies for more than 20 years. She was the first female president of the Kansas Pharmacist Association and the first female chair of the American Pharmaceutical Association. In 1993, President Bill Clinton appointed Rhudy as a Special White House Employee to serve as the pharmacist representative on the White House Health Professions Review Group, a part of the Clinton Health Care Reform. That same year she joined Wyeth Pharmaceuticals as director of Pharmacy Relations. Rhudy was soon named the first woman senior vice president for Global Corporate Affairs at Wyeth Pharmaceuticals. In 2008, Rhudy left Wyeth and launched her own consulting practice. According to Gene Hotchkiss, senior associate dean of the School of Pharmacy, Rhudy has long been considered “the most influential woman in the pharmaceutical industry in the United States.”

Student honorees are as follows:

  • Megan Flanagan, Los Angeles, freshman, undecided major; Jameelah Jones, Conyers, Ga., graduate student in African and African-American studies; Sarah Maner, Lenexa, freshman in business marketing; and Hayley Tuggle, Topeka, freshman in biology; Alma Poehler Brook Memorial Award
  • Brianne Riley, Naperville, Ill., senior in community health, Outstanding Woman Student in Athletics
  • Hannah Sitz, Andover, senior in strategic communication and psychology, Outstanding Woman Student in Community Service
  • Leigh Loving, McPherson, junior in genetics, Outstanding Woman Student in Leadership
  • Kayla Sale, Olathe, junior in mathematics, Outstanding Woman Student in Partnership
  • Alyssa Ong, Penang, Malaysia, senior in finance and accounting, Outstanding International Woman Student
  • Ashlie Koehn, Burns, junior, environmental studies and Russian, East European and Eurasian studies, Outstanding Non-Traditional Woman Student
  • Jill Langlas, Wheaton, Ill., senior in mechanical engineering, Sally Mason Student in Science
  • Tina Woods, Galena, sophomore in secondary Spanish education and pre-law, Marlesa & Hannalesa Roney Student Success Mentor.

 

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Why KU
  • One-third of full-time faculty have written casebooks used at U.S. law schools
  • 2 KU law faculty were U.S. Supreme Court clerks
  • KU’s Project for Innocence: 33 conviction reversals since 2009
  • 7,300+ alumni live in all 50 states and 18 foreign countries
  • #18 “best value” law school in the nation — National Jurist Magazine
  • 12 interdisciplinary joint degrees
  • 27th nationwide for lowest debt at graduation. — U.S. News & World Report
  • 70 percent of upper-level law classes have 25 or fewer students
  • Nearly 800 employment interviews at law school, 2012-13
  • Top 25% for number of 2013 grads hired by the nation’s largest law firms
  • 20th: for number of law alumni promoted to partner at the 250 largest law firms