KU professor gives input on French newspaper attack

"French police officials say they have identified three men as suspects in a deadly attack against newspaper offices that killed 12 people and shook the nation.
. . . 

It was the deadliest attack in France in half a century.

. . . 

University of Kansas Associate Dean for International and Comparative Law Raj Bhala said that this attack can affect American communities by people misunderstanding the attacks and backlashing.

CIA interrogation report released

"The US Senate Intelligence Committee this week released their report into the CIA interrogation program, which was established after the 9/11 terror attacks.

. . . 

Producer George Freeman spoke to Raj Bhala, lawyer, author and associate dean for international law at the University of Kansas School of Law, on the release of the CIA interrogation report."

KU professor: Torture report's release shows U.S. strength

"A 500-page U.S. Senate report on the CIA's enhanced interrogation techniques has drawn strong reaction. A professor at the University of Kansas said the content may be troubling, but it's important that the report was released.

Raj Bhala, the associate dean for international law at the University of Kansas School of Law, said it's upsetting it took so long for the report to finally come out.

. . . 

KU law partners with Indian law schools

Kate Miller wrote:

"The University’s Law School recently revealed its new partnerships with four of India’s top law schools, which will encourage collaboration between students and faculty of the universities. In addition, the program aims to increase the University of Kansas’s visibility in India, enhancing job opportunities for law students from all universities involved.

Free speech battle heats up

KU Law professor Raj Bhala weighed in on the Kansas Board of Regents' new social media policy for university employees. 

Craig Andres wrote: 

"The Kansas Board of Regents recently announced that speech by University employees that is a detriment to the functions of the University, could be cause for discipline.

 . . . 

Now, some professors say the Kansas Board of Regents policy could have a chill on free speech. In fact, some say they wonder if they could be disciplined or even fired for talking to the media.

For Saudi women in Kansas City, driving isn’t ‘a big issue’

Rick Montgomery wrote: "When she recently obtained a Missouri driver’s license, college student Shrouk Alburj wasn’t thinking of liberation. She was thinking: I need the wheels.

Her native Saudi Arabia is the world’s only country that bars women from driving. But as a movement quietly builds back home to issue licenses to women, Alburj and other Saudi women studying in Kansas City say they’re puzzled by the attention that Americans have given the subject.

 . . . 

KU professor: Potential reward of Iran deal worth risk

KU Law professor Raj Bhala expressed optimism that Iran will avoid expanding its nuclear weapons program in exchange for lifting economic sanctions. His view counters that of U.S. Senators Pat Roberts and Jerry Moran, who harbor reservations about the deal.

Tim Carpenter wrote: "A law professor at The University of Kansas stood apart from U.S. senators representing Kansas by expressing optimism about a deal granting Iran temporary relief from crippling economic sanctions in return for curbing expansion of a nuclear weapon program.

The Rise Of Anti-Sharia Legislation

Most religions have rules, guidance, law of some kind. Christians look to the teachings of Jesus, or the commandments. Jewish people turn to Torah. And Muslims look to Shariah—the code of Islamic law that guides everything from what to eat and how to dress to bigger questions—like resolving marital disputes, or punishing violent crimes.


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