An innocent man served 17 years. His ‘crime’? He looked almost exactly like the real suspect.

"Investigators discovered that the crime Jones was convicted of was very likely committed by another man — his doppelganger with a somewhat-similar first name.

...

The resemblance was uncanny. Their braided hairstyles, goatees, dark eyes, thick eye brows and complexion all look strikingly similar.

'We were just like, holy crap,' said Alice Craig, Jones’s attorney.

After finding his doppelganger, Kansas City man is freed from prison

"In prison for a crime he adamantly denied committing, Richard Anthony Jones repeatedly heard from others that there was another prisoner who looked just like him.

Not only were they doppelgangers, but Jones was told that he and the other man shared the same first name.

Jones never ran across the man, but the lawyers he passed the information on to began digging into his case and came to the conclusion that Jones was indeed an innocent man.

‘Everybody has a doppelganger’: KC man freed after 17 years in prison for robbery

"A Missouri man who spent nearly 17 years in prison for a 1999 robbery was freed after supporters found another man who looked enough like him that the victim and other witnesses said they could no longer be sure who committed the crime.

Richard Anthony Jones, of Kansas City, Mo., always maintained he didn’t commit the robbery and two years ago asked two organizations that advocate for inmates for help proving his innocence.

Missouri Man Freed After 17 Years in Prison for Robbery

"A Missouri man who spent nearly 17 years in prison for a 1999 robbery was freed after supporters found another man who looked enough like him that the victim and other witnesses said they could no longer be sure who committed the crime.

Richard Anthony Jones, of Kansas City, Missouri, always maintained he didn't commit the robbery and two years ago asked two organizations that advocate for inmates for help proving his innocence.

KU Innocence Project helps free man from prison after wrongful robbery conviction

"A University of Kansas law school effort helped free a wrongfully convicted man from prison this week.

Richard Jones was released from prison on Thursday, after his robbery conviction was overturned in Johnson County District Court the previous day, according to a news release from the Midwest Innocence Project and the KU School of Law’s Paul E. Wilson Project for Innocence. Jones had served 17 years of a 19-year sentence for an aggravated robbery conviction stemming from a 1999 purse-snatching at a Walmart parking lot.

KC man jailed 17 years for purse snatching released after judge overturns conviction

"A Kansas City man who spent nearly 17 years in prison for purse snatching was released Wednesday after a judge overturned his conviction.

The 10th Judicial District Court in Johnson County vacated Richard Jones’ 1999 aggravated robbery conviction. He had been sentenced to more than 19 years in prison.

But according to officials with the Midwest Innocence Project, Jones was convicted based solely on eyewitness identification, despite presenting a verified alibi.

Wrongful conviction measure: Resident who did time in prison supports bill requiring recordings

"The once wrongly convicted and now freed Floyd Bledsoe thinks his life would have been far different if law enforcement had captured his words and his brother’s words in recordings.

...

'Detectives interrogated Mr. Lowery for a full day without food or water and denied him a lawyer. He believed that he was not leaving the room until he confessed,' wrote attorney Alice Craig in testimony. She is the supervising attorney for the Paul E. Wilson Project for Innocence and Post-Conviction Remedies at the University of Kansas School of Law."

 

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