KU law class on human trafficking helps real-world victims

"Victims of human trafficking face overwhelming obstacles in escaping their captors for good.

In more cases than one might think, what they need more than anything else is a lawyer.

With this in mind, Kansas University clinical associate professor Katie Cronin taught KU’s first Human Trafficking Law and Policy class this spring. While earning credit for the course, law students went to work on real cases.

Law school welcomes new faculty


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