Panelists at discussion on sexual violence condemn harmful media messages on rape

"Harmful media messages on rape abound, University of Kansas law professor Corey Rayburn Yung told an audience of about 30 people Wednesday at the Watkins Museum of History, going so far as to say that classic cartoon character Pepé Le Pew is a rapist who perpetuates a harmful view of male sexual aggression.

Yung was part of a panel discussion on sexual violence that explored such topics as how the media reports on sexual violence, what friends and family can do for victims and a few local solutions."

As court prepares to hear school funding case, voters may hold most of the cards

"The long-running school finance lawsuit Gannon v. Kansas will return to the state Supreme Court on Wednesday, marking the fourth time the justices have been asked to resolve the matter.

This time, though, the oral arguments before the court will coincide with a hotly contested political campaign in which the issue of school funding is driving many races for state legislative seats.

The arguments also come at a time when five of the seven Supreme Court justices are on the election ballot themselves.

...

Kobach defends voting laws during Dole Institute forum

"After months of defending controversial voting laws in federal and state court, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach debated the laws during a forum at the Dole Institute of Politics Tuesday night.

...

'The legislature makes popular decisions and that's why we have a judiciary that has to make the unpopular decision,' said Mark Johnson, adjunct professor of law at the University of Kansas.

Johnson also pointed out that current voting laws may prove to have an adverse effect on minority voting.

Kobach, Johnson exchange blows in voter law debate

"Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach staked a claim Tuesday night as a national leader in voter security by championing adoption of laws requiring proof of citizenship to register, photograph identification to cast a ballot and mail-in ballot restrictions.

Lawyer Mark Johnson, sitting to Kobach’s right at the Dole Institute of Politics, said the Republican secretary of state was a central advocate for reform of voting law, undoubtedly popular, that ought to be declared unconstitutional for serving as a deterrent to participation in elections."

Retrial in fire death for 'Chicago' Robinson to start in February

"The retrial of a man charged with the 2006 slaying of a woman who died in a downtown fire will start on Feb. 27, a Shawnee County District judge said Thursday.

...

On Aug. 19, Shawnee County Chief Judge Evelyn Wilson issued the ruling overturning Robinson’s murder conviction in the death of Marvina Washington, 53, and ordered that he be tried again.

...

Law professors to participate in voting rights program

Thursday, September 08, 2016

LAWRENCE — The Dole Institute of Politics announced today the addition of a Constitution Day program on voting rights featuring Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and KU Law adjunct professor Mark P. Johnson.

The annual Constitution Day program is titled “Protecting Election Integrity, Voter Suppression, or Something Else?” and will take place at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13. It will feature a discussion between Johnson and Kobach on the Constitution and voting rights, including voter ID laws, proof of citizenship laws, the Interstate Crosscheck system and more. Stephen McAllister, KU Law professor and solicitor general of Kansas, will serve as the program’s moderator.

“Voting rights is in the news and in the courts all across the nation, and now it’s at the Dole Institute,” said Associate Director Barbara Ballard.  “This exciting panel will discuss voting rights, and we know the public will want to attend and ask their questions as well.”

The event will be free, open to the public and located at the Dole Institute. It is co-sponsored by the KU School of Law.

The Robert J. Dole Institute of Politics is dedicated to promoting political and civic participation as well as civil discourse in a bipartisan, philosophically balanced manner. It is located on KU’s West Campus and houses the Dole Archive and Special Collections. Through its robust public programming, congressional archive and museum, the Dole Institute strives to celebrate public serve and the legacy of U.S. Senator Bob Dole.

More information on all programs, as well as ongoing additions to the schedule, can be found on the Dole Institute’s website, www.doleinstitute.org.

When Detectives Dismiss Rape Reports Before Investigating Them

"Across the country, some police departments claim a vast number of rape reports are false. A BuzzFeed News investigation into a year of “unfounded” rapes in Baltimore County reveals that detectives often don’t investigate them at all — even when the man had been arrested for rape before.

...

'The problems Baltimore County police have in handling rape cases are are emblematic of what goes on in police departments across the country,' said Corey Rayburn Yung, a law professor at University of Kansas School of Law, who studies policing and rape nationwide."

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - faculty
Why KU
  • One-third of full-time faculty have written casebooks and treatises
  • 2 KU law faculty were U.S. Supreme Court clerks
  • KU’s Project for Innocence: 34 conviction reversals since 2009
  • 7,600+ alumni in all 50 states, D.C., and 21 foreign countries
  • #18 “best value” law school in the nation — National Jurist Magazine
  • 12 interdisciplinary joint degrees
  • 20th nationwide for lowest debt at graduation. — U.S. News & World Report
  • 80 percent of upper-level law classes have 25 or fewer students
  • More than 600 employment interviews at law school, 2014-15
  • 92 percent overall employment rate for Class of 2014 – top 20 percent nationally
  • 23rd: for number of law alumni promoted to partner at nation’s largest law firms
  • #1 in Kansas and Missouri for July 2015 bar exam performance