Courts Budget Intensifies Kansas Dispute Over Powers

"The fight between Gov. Sam Brownback of Kansas and the state’s judicial branch has escalated, with the governor last week signing into law a bill that could strip state courts of their funding.

The measure, at the end of a lengthy bill that allocated money for the judiciary this year, stipulates that if a state court strikes down a 2014 law that removed some powers from the State Supreme Court, the judiciary will lose its funding.

...

KU law class on human trafficking helps real-world victims

"Victims of human trafficking face overwhelming obstacles in escaping their captors for good.

In more cases than one might think, what they need more than anything else is a lawyer.

With this in mind, Kansas University clinical associate professor Katie Cronin taught KU’s first Human Trafficking Law and Policy class this spring. While earning credit for the course, law students went to work on real cases.

Smashing the Glass Ceiling: Women in the Law

"Female lawyers have seemingly overcome systematic exclusion, but many still struggle with stress, influence and power as they are paid less and do more on average per week in terms of work (domestic and professional) than men.

...

'I regularly encounter people who believe that because there may be de jure gender equality there is de facto gender equity. The glass ceiling is real and it persists to this day,' reveals the Honorable Elizabeth Ann Kronk Warner, who serves as the Director of the Tribal Law & Government Center at the University of Kansas School of Law."

Kansas Lawmakers’ Budget Links Court Funding to Judicial Decision

"A budget advanced by Kansas legislators would eliminate funding for state courts if a judge strikes down a controversial law passed last year.

Republican senators and representatives agreed Monday on a two-year judicial budget that would self-destruct if any court blocks or overturns a 2014 law that stripped the Kansas Supreme Court of some administrative authority, giving local courts control over their own budgets and leadership.

More than 250 sexual assault kits never sent to crime lab

"More than 250 sexual assault kits were never sent off to the state's crime lab at three of the area's largest law enforcement agencies.

...

But what experts are now learning is that when investigators choose not to test every kit, it comes at a high price. In some cases, it has allowed predators to keep preying.

...

'Offenders in some cases would have been off the street and wouldn't be able to commit more crimes,' says Corey Rayburn Yung, a University of Kansas associate law professor, who has studied America's hidden rape crisis.

Expert says unfounded rape cases can lead to attackers going free

"Each year local law enforcement agencies decide which rape cases will be reported to the FBI and which ones will not, sometimes leaving rapists on the streets to attack again.

A national expert says the number of rapes reported often are underreported in midsize to larger cities like Chattanooga so the numbers don't look as bad.

...

Yung conducted a study using FBI uniform crime reporting statistics from 1995 to 2012 in cities across the country, including Chattanooga.

He compared the number of homicides reported to the number of rapes.

Law class explores human trafficking, provides resources

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

 

 

LAWRENCE — The common perception of human trafficking might be that of young people forced into prostitution or substandard working conditions. The ways in which attorneys, and even law students, can help prevent and respond to human trafficking might not make the headlines, but a new class at the University of Kansas School of Law is helping those on the front lines fight human trafficking and serve victims.

Katie Cronin, clinical associate professor at the law school and in the Department of Family Medicine, taught Human Trafficking Law and Policy for the first time this semester. Cronin, who also directs the law school’s Medical-Legal Partnership Clinic, said she wanted to teach this new class to help law students understand that attorneys in many different specializations will likely encounter this issue at some point in their careers. The course introduced students to international protocols and domestic laws that are designed to prevent human trafficking, protect victims and prosecute perpetrators and those who benefit from human trafficking. The students, in turn, wrote papers that speak to a particular facet of human trafficking or produced projects that will provide resources to attorneys, health care workers, police and shelters who assist human trafficking victims here in the state of Kansas.

“Human trafficking has been viewed as a coastal problem. People don’t always grasp that its victims originate in the Midwest as well,” Cronin said. “There are victims of all ages, both male and female, and it’s a problem both foreign and domestic. Sex trafficking often garners most of the media attention, but, statistically, labor trafficking is happening at a much higher rate, and there can be sexual victimization happening in the labor trafficking context. To think of sex and labor exploitation as always being two very distinct things is false.“

In addition to learning about laws like the Trafficking Victims Protection Act, the class produced projects specifically designed to assist attorneys, victim advocates, police and health care workers in helping trafficking victims. The projects included a manual for pro bono attorneys working T visa cases, an immigration remedy available to foreign national victims, prepared with the help of the Kansas Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence. Lauren Bavitz prepared a Know Your Rights brochure for trafficking victims served by the Willow Domestic Violence Center. There are a host of legal issues for victims to consider, from protection orders to immigration issues to housing matters.

“I was interested in the class to understand the legal nuances in combating the issue. For example, I wanted to learn the different legal remedies between non-citizen versus citizen victims and the most effective way to prosecute perpetrators,” Bavitz said. “My project connects a victim-centered approach with practical legal resources, because often, legal remedies are unattainable for those who do not know where to look. I hope that in distributing the brochure throughout Kansas, I can connect a few victims and families to the legal remedies they need.”

Marci Mauch, a student in the class and a former MLP Clinic participant, produced training materials to help police officers and health care professionals at the University of Kansas Hospital recognize signs of human trafficking and appropriate ways to ask questions, respond and offer help. Trafficking victims often come into contact with police or medical professionals, and it is not always immediately clear that they may be involved in a trafficking situation.

“While working at (KU’s) Medical-Legal Partnership Clinic, I learned that health care providers are in an excellent and unique position to identify victims of trafficking. I hope it will make a difference for all those that use it – for the health care providers to be able to identify the victims, the victims to receive the help they need to escape or overcome their situations and attorneys and law enforcement to be able to identify the traffickers, build a case against them and help the victims,” Mauch said. “Trafficking victims can be hidden in plain sight. If something seems off, it is better to say something than to ignore it. So many trafficking victims are rescued by good Samaritans that noticed something was wrong and reported it to the authorities.”

Students also researched and wrote about a range of topics, including:

  • Human trafficking and connections to the U.S. military
  • Ensuring multinational corporations are accountable and their supply lines are free from trafficking
  • LGBT youth and trafficking
  • Victims who are minors
  • Immigration and trafficking.

The value of examining the topic of human trafficking in a broad legal sense lies in the fact that the problem touches so many areas of law, Cronin said. Whether the students go on to work in immigration or corporate law, prosecution, victim services or numerous other specialties, they’ll be able to make a difference.

“We have this cohort of law students who will graduate and pursue a range of legal work but who will now have awareness of this complex problem,” Cronin said. “Knowing students have that awareness at the beginning of their careers excites me.”

Providing services and resources to those already working in the field also gives students valuable experience while proving they can help address societal problems while they are still students.

“I think the class was solution-focused. Of course, we started by gaining an understanding of what the problem is and its basis in the law, but then we looked at ways to use the law as a tool to tackle it,” Cronin said. “That corresponds with my understanding of what KU Law students are truly capable of achieving, and I think it corresponds with the abolitionist values of our state and university.”

Law faculty members earn promotion, tenure

Friday, May 01, 2015

LAWRENCE — Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little has approved promotion and the award of tenure where indicated for 67 individuals at the University of Kansas Lawrence and Edwards campuses and 46 individuals at KU Medical Center.

Chancellor Gray-Little, Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Jeffrey S. Vitter, who chairs the University Committee on Promotion and Tenure on the Lawrence campus, and Dr. Douglas Girod, executive vice chancellor at KU Medical Center, issued a joint statement of congratulations.

“Congratulations to the outstanding faculty and researchers who’ve reached the next milestone in their careers. KU’s dedicated scholars and educators are addressing the challenges of our changing world and propelling this university forward as a major research institution. Their enthusiasm and contributions further our mission of educating leaders, building healthy communities and making discoveries that change the world. The commitment they have to ensure students succeed is inspiring.

“As always, the University Committees on Promotion and Tenure on both campuses did an excellent job evaluating the many eligible candidates. We hope the entire university will join us in recognizing these educators who uphold the institution's ideals through research, teaching and service.”

KU Lawrence and Edwards campuses

To full professor

  • Glenn E. Adams, psychology
  • Ronald M. Barrett-Gonzalez, aerospace engineering
  • Henry Bial, theatre
  • Sharon A. Billings, ecology & evolutionary biology, senior scientist Kansas Biological Survey
  • Chris Brown, geography
  • Nathaniel A. Brunsell, geography
  • Byron Caminero-Santangelo, English
  • Andrew N.K. Chen, business
  • Dorothy M. Daley, public affairs & administration/environmental studies program
  • Dale Dorsey, philosophy
  • Ben Eggleston, philosophy
  • Jin Feng, mathematics
  • Kenneth J. Fischer, mechanical engineering
  • Truman C. Gamblin, molecular biosciences
  • Wonpil Im, molecular biosciences, bioinformatics
  • Yolanda Jackson, psychology, applied behavioral science, clinical child psychology program
  • Ted P. Juhl, economics
  • Paul T. Kelton, history
  • Audrey L. Lamb, molecular biosciences
  • Jennifer S. Laurence, pharmaceutical chemistry
  • Scott B. Murphy, music
  • Diane C. Nielsen, curriculum & teaching
  • Shannon O'Lear, geography, environmental studies program
  • Scott Reinardy, journalism
  • Emily E. Scott, medicinal chemistry
  • Sean J. Smith, special education
  • Joy K. Ward, ecology & evolutionary biology
  • Elizabeth A. Kronk Warner, law*
  • Tara S. Welch, classics
  • Stacey S. White, urban planning

*with tenure

To associate professor with tenure

  • Mizuki Azuma, molecular biosciences
  • Justin P. Blumenstiel, ecology & evolutionary biology
  • Mariana P. Candido, history
  • Yvonnes Chen, journalism
  • Jerry Crawford II, journalism
  • Alexander C. Diener, geography
  • Florence DiGennaro Reed, applied behavioral science
  • Heather Getha-Taylor, public affairs & administration
  • Nicole Hodges Persley, theatre
  • Sheyda Jahanbani, history
  • Kyoungchul Kong, physics & astronomy
  • Yan Li, East Asian languages & cultures
  • Amy N. Mendenhall, social welfare
  • Utako Minai, linguistics
  • Andreas Moeller, geology
  • Shannon K. Portillo, public affairs & administration
  • Derek D. Reed, applied behavioral science
  • Shenqiang Ren, chemistry
  • Kathryn A. Rhine, anthropology
  • Rebecca L. Rovit, theatre
  • Frederic Sellet, anthropology
  • Andrew Short, ecology & evolutionary biology, associate curator, Biodiversity Institute
  • Leigh A. Stearns, geology
  • D. Alan Street, music
  • Zsolt Talata, mathematics
  • Annie Tremblay, linguistics
  • Xuemin Tu, mathematics
  • Anne Williford, social welfare
  • Alesia Woszidlo, communication studies
  • Hui Xiao, east Asian languages & cultures
  • Kyoim Yun, east Asian languages & cultures

Academic staff

  • Pamela Keller, law, to clinical professor
  • W. Matthew Gillispie, speech, language, hearing: science & disorders, to clinical associate professor
  • Kristin Pedersen, speech, language, hearing: science & disorders, to clinical associate professor

Office of Research

  • Amy Gaumer Erickson, Center for Research on Learning, to associate research professor
  • Jean P. Hall, Center for Research on Learning, to research professor
  • Fernando Rodriguez-Morales, Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets, to associate research professor

 

KU Medical Center campuses

To professor (previously tenured)

  • Sandra Bergquist Beringer, School of Nursing
  • Christine Daley, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Family Medicine
  • Timothy Fields, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Philip Johnson, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Radiology
  • Kenneth McCarson, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics
  • Jianming Qiu, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Microbiology

Tenure awarded (at current rank of professor)

  • Mazen Dimachkie, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Neurology

To professor (affiliate track, Mid-America Cardiologist, nontenure track)

  • Kamal Gupta, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine

To professor (affiliate track, Stowers Institute, nontenure track)

  • Michael Washburn, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

To professor (clinical track, part-time nontenure track)

  • Jacqueline Osland, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Surgery

To clinical professor (clinical track, full-time, nontenure track)

  • Katherine Fletcher, School of Nursing

Tenure awarded (at current rank of associate professor)

  • Mazin Alkasspooles, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Surgery
  • Francisco Diaz-Ceballos, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Biostatistics
  • Tomoo Iwakuma, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Cancer Biology
  • Susana Patton, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Pediatrics
  • Shahid Umar, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology

To associate professor with tenure

  • Sandra Billinger, School of Health Professions Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science
  • Joshua Broghammer, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Urology
  • Vargheese Chennathukuzhi, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology
  • Jill Hamilton-Reeves, School of Health Professions Department of Dietetics and Nutrition
  • Megha Ramaswamy, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Preventive Medicine

To associate professor on clinical scholar track (nontenure track)

  • Omar Aljitawi, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine
  • Wei Cui, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Mirsad Dupanovic, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Anesthesiology
  • Tuba Esfandyari, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine
  • Clinton Humphrey, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Otolaryngology
  • Christopher Larsen, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Otolaryngology
  • Angela Mayorga May, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science
  • Prakash Neupane, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine
  • Madhuri Reddy, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Matthew Sharpe, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine
  • Kerri Weeks, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Pediatrics
  • Sri Yarlagadda, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine
  • Jana Zaudke, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Family Medicine

To clinical associate professor (clinical track, full-time, nontenure track)

  • Yvonne Colgrove, School of Health Professions Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science
  • Janet Hudzicki, School of Health Professions Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences
  • Mary Meyer, School of Nursing

To clinical associate professor (clinical track, part-time, nontenure track)

  • Kent Bradley, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Robert Kraft, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Family and Community Medicine
  • Zachary Kuhlmann, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Jane Sosland, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Pediatrics

To clinical associate professor (clinical track, volunteer, nontenure track)

  • Debra Desilet-Dobbs, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Radiology
  • Steve Hwang, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Pathology
  • Pavan Reddy, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Internal Medicine
  • Stephen Thornton, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Emergency Medicine

To research associate professor (research track, full-time, nontenture track)

  • Kathleen Gustafson, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Neurology.

Washburn inquiry into Phi Delta Theta fraternity raises free speech questions

"Washburn University’s suspension of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity this week following disclosure of crude text messages and a photo of a topless woman raises questions of free speech and how much power public colleges hold over students’ behavior.

Washburn’s investigation centers on whether the fraternity members violated the student code of conduct. In an email to faculty and staff, President Jerry Farley said appropriate sanctions will be imposed once the inquiry is completed.

. . . 

In the case of John Booker Jr., entrapment is an unlikely defense

"Booker, 20, is charged with one count of attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction, one count of attempting to damage property by means of an explosive and one count of attempting to provide material support to the Islamic State. He had his initial court appearance Friday and will have a preliminary hearing April 20. He is being represented by a public defender.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - faculty
Why KU
  • One-third of full-time faculty have written casebooks used at U.S. law schools
  • 2 KU law faculty were U.S. Supreme Court clerks
  • KU’s Project for Innocence: 33 conviction reversals since 2009
  • 7,300+ alumni live in all 50 states and 18 foreign countries
  • #18 “best value” law school in the nation — National Jurist Magazine
  • 12 interdisciplinary joint degrees
  • 27th nationwide for lowest debt at graduation. — U.S. News & World Report
  • 70 percent of upper-level law classes have 25 or fewer students
  • Nearly 800 employment interviews at law school, 2012-13
  • Top 25% for number of 2013 grads hired by the nation’s largest law firms
  • 20th: for number of law alumni promoted to partner at the 250 largest law firms