KU Law to host Midwestern Law and Economics Association Conference

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas School of Law will welcome legal scholars to Lawrence this week for the annual meeting of the Midwestern Law and Economics Association. Scholars will explore the economic aspects of current issues in contract law, tort law, corporate law, tax law and health care law, covering topics ranging from executive compensation to IRS reform to inequality and family law.

“This is the second time we've hosted MLEA at KU, and we are looking forward to having the group back this year,” said conference organizer Christopher Drahozal, associate dean for research and faculty development and John M. Rounds Professor of Law at KU. “The conference provides KU faculty and students the chance to interact with law and economics scholars not only from the Midwest but from all over the United States and the world.”

The conference will be held Friday and Saturday, Oct. 2-3, at Green Hall on the Lawrence campus.

MLEA is a group of scholars who study the intersection between economics and the law. Members have gathered annually since 2001 to share their work and exchange ideas.

Drahozal’s work focuses on dispute resolution with an emphasis on arbitration. He has written multiple books and articles on commercial arbitration and has presented on the subject in Europe, Asia, Canada, and before Congress and state legislatures.

 Visit the KU Law website for a complete schedule and list of presenters.

KU Prof and Kobach Wrangle over Voter ID Law

"Kansas adopted a voter ID mandate in 2011, requiring all voters in the state to show a picture ID. But not everyone is pleased with the measure, notes The Topeka Capital-Journal. Last week a law professor from the University of Kansas and Secretary of State Kris Kobach clashed over the measure. The two sharply disagreed over the likelihood that illegal immigrants would come out of hiding and risk arrest in order to vote.

Fight Over Kansas Court Funding Attracts National Attention - KPR

"A legal fight over funding for Kansas courts has attracted national attention. At issue is a state law that changes the way chief judges are selected. A subsequent budget bill stipulated that the Kansas court system would lose all of its funding if the judicial selection law was struck down. A district court has struck down the law. That decision is on hold while there’s an appeal, but it still leaves questions about funding for the courts.
 

Fight Over Kansas Court Funding Attracts National Attention - KMUW

"A legal fight in Kansas over funding for the courts is attracting national headlines and attention from advocacy groups outside the state. At issue is a law that changes the way chief judges are selected. A later budget bill was tied to the law.

As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, that means if the judicial selection law is struck down, the Kansas court system’s funding is also eliminated.

...

Kris Kobach’s dual voter registration system in Kansas is illegal and should be dumped, ACLU says

"An odd repercussion has arisen over Kansas’ proof-of-citizenship requirement for residents who register to vote.

So odd that the American Civil Liberties Union of Kansas has asked a state court to put an end to the two-tiered voter registration system that Secretary of State Kris Kobach has created, a system that critics call the law’s 'unintended consequence' or, less kindly, 'collateral damage.'

...

Detainee transfers from Guantanamo to Leavenworth unlikely to result in new legal rights

"The transfer of detainees from Guantanamo Bay in Cuba to a military prison in Leavenworth could spark a rash of litigation but no assurances the detainees will gain an influx of constitutional rights, according to legal experts and civil rights lawyers.

...

'Detainees already have a right to the use of U.S. courts,' said Tom Stacy, a law professor at the University of Kansas. 'For purposes of habeas corpus, the transfer of inmates from Guantanamo Bay to Kansas wouldn’t really change anything.'”

Environmental law professor wins interdisciplinary starter grant

Monday, September 14, 2015

LAWRENCE – The Commons, a partnership at the University of Kansas that encourages cross-disciplinary research and learning, awarded $30,000 to KU faculty research groups in the spring 2015 cycle of its Interdisciplinary Starter Grant.

Each research team was awarded $10,000 to launch its interdisciplinary projects in 2015-2016.

Rachel Krause, School of Public Affairs and Administration; Ward Lyles, School of Architecture, Design & Planning, and Uma Outka, School of Law, received funds for their research, which looks at how local energy transitions can be leveraged to advance local social justice objectives. This research project Localized Energy and Climate Adaptation: Advancing Community-Scale Social Justice Goals is situated at the nexus of two approaches to climate change research — mitigation and adaptation — and explores their intersection through a social equity lens.

Michael Vitevitch, psychology, and Arienne Dwyer, anthropology and Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities, will examine how the emerging field of network science can be applied across disciplines. Using the principles of network science, researchers examine complex systems and the relationships that exist between individuals in that system (e.g., people in a social group, animals in an ecosystem, etc.). A two-day workshop in spring 2016 will bring leading researchers to demonstrate how network science has been applied to examine language, the arts, the humanities and the sciences. Participants can also learn how to apply these analysis techniques in their own work.

Mary Anne Jordan, visual art, and Caroline Chaboo, ecology & evolutionary biology and the Biodiversity Institute, will launch a study on indigenous dyes in the Sacred Valley of Peru. Jordan and Chaboo will expand their collaboration with Nilda Callañaupa, a master weaver and director of the Center for Traditional Textiles, to document the biodiversity of the region as it relates to traditional dyeing practices and investigate the biological and cultural implications for teaching and preserving traditional practices.

The Commons will host the next round of Starter Grants in Fall 2015 with an information session for all interested KU faculty at 2 p.m. Sept. 23.

The Commons is a collaboration of the Biodiversity Institute, the Hall Center for the Humanities, and the Spencer Museum of Art. Its mission is to bring together scholars and students from the sciences, humanities, and arts to explore the reciprocal relationships between natural and cultural systems. Interdisciplinary Starter Grants are made possible through the support of the Office of Research.

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