Kansas lawmakers sending asset forfeiture bills for study

"Kansas lawmakers are opting not to act this year on questions raised by an audit critical of the state's asset forfeiture laws, but have instead asked a judicial advisory group to review potential changes.

The audit, released last summer, concluded that law enforcement agencies take advantage of vague laws governing how they should report and use property seized from those suspected of crimes. Some departments use proceeds for what look like routine expenses, which can create an incentive for increased seizures, the audit said.

Sexual assault under-reported in on U.S. college campuses: study

"Researchers looked at data about on-campus sexual assaults reported by 31 large private and public universities and colleges during audits by the federal government. During the audits, the number of reported sexual assaults rose an average of 44 percent compared to previously reported figures.

After the audits ended, the reported number of sexual assaults fell to pre-audit levels. This finding suggests that some schools provide accurate statistics about sexual crimes only when they're under government scrutiny, according to the study.

KU law students starting income tax assistance program

"The University of Kansas School of Law is being recognized for the students’ community service. Students are taking what they’ve learned in the classroom to the real world in the name of charity.

Law school students are using their knowledge to help local tax payers.

'It’s great in the law school setting because not only are you giving back to the community, but the student is also getting really valuable legal experience,' School of Law Dean Stephen Mazza said.

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Wrongful conviction measure: Resident who did time in prison supports bill requiring recordings

"The once wrongly convicted and now freed Floyd Bledsoe thinks his life would have been far different if law enforcement had captured his words and his brother’s words in recordings.

...

'Detectives interrogated Mr. Lowery for a full day without food or water and denied him a lawyer. He believed that he was not leaving the room until he confessed,' wrote attorney Alice Craig in testimony. She is the supervising attorney for the Paul E. Wilson Project for Innocence and Post-Conviction Remedies at the University of Kansas School of Law."

 

University of Kansas Law Professor Familiar With SCOTUS Pick Explains What Makes Him Special

President Donald Trump has nominated Judge Neil Gorsuch to fill the seat on the United States Supreme Court left vacant by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia eleven months ago. University of Kansas Law Professor Lumen R. Mulligan has argued before Gorsuch in his current capacity as a judge on the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Mulligan is the Director of the Shook, Hardy & Bacon Center for Excellence in Advocacy at KU. Mulligan says Gorsuch intellectually fulfills the requirements of the post.

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