Legislators open hearing on Kan. judicial changes

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Several law professors said Wednesday they would favor a different system for appointing judges to the Kansas Court of Appeals and the state Supreme Court.

The Senate Judiciary Committee heard testimony on a proposed change in the Kansas Constitution that would allow the governor to appoint appellate judges, with confirmation by the Senate. Voters would have to approve the constitutional change.

Indian wind projects get help

Tribes hoping to develop wind projects face the same challenges as the rest of the industry, such as the low price of competing natural gas and a longstanding transmission bottleneck in rural areas. Besides the additional BIA review, financing a tribal wind project is complicated by thorny legal and political issues inherent in the tribes' status as sovereign nations.

Lawmakers hear arguments for changing Kansas' court selection process at legislative retreat

Conservative lawmakers heard several options Saturday for changing how Kansas’ appellate and Supreme Court judges are selected in a discussion that may foreshadow a fierce debate in the upcoming legislative session.

Stephen Ware, a law professor at the University of Kansas, said Kansas’ judicial selection system is unusual and “undemocratic” in how it chooses its nominating commission.

Kansans elect a governor and the governor selects four members of the commission. But five of the members are elected by 10,000 or so members of the Kansas Bar Association.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - faculty
Why KU
  • One-third of full-time faculty have written casebooks used at U.S. law schools
  • 2 KU law faculty were U.S. Supreme Court clerks
  • KU’s Project for Innocence: 33 conviction reversals since 2009
  • 7,300+ alumni live in all 50 states and 18 foreign countries
  • #18 “best value” law school in the nation — National Jurist Magazine
  • 12 interdisciplinary joint degrees
  • 27th nationwide for lowest debt at graduation. — U.S. News & World Report
  • 70 percent of upper-level law classes have 25 or fewer students
  • Nearly 800 employment interviews at law school, 2012-13
  • Top 25% for number of 2013 grads hired by the nation’s largest law firms
  • 20th: for number of law alumni promoted to partner at the 250 largest law firms