Clinton vs. Trump: What's at Stake Tonight for NBC, Fox, ABC, CBS and the Debates Themselves

"[Over] the last eight years trust in the media had maintained a relatively steady level, around 40%-to-45% -- so a drop to 32% this year is significant," Mele wrote in an email. "I think not just NBC but the media as a whole needs to consider their role in this election cycle with the cold, clear eye normally reserved for outsiders.

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Kobach defends voting laws during Dole Institute forum

"After months of defending controversial voting laws in federal and state court, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach debated the laws during a forum at the Dole Institute of Politics Tuesday night.

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'The legislature makes popular decisions and that's why we have a judiciary that has to make the unpopular decision,' said Mark Johnson, adjunct professor of law at the University of Kansas.

Johnson also pointed out that current voting laws may prove to have an adverse effect on minority voting.

Kobach, Johnson exchange blows in voter law debate

"Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach staked a claim Tuesday night as a national leader in voter security by championing adoption of laws requiring proof of citizenship to register, photograph identification to cast a ballot and mail-in ballot restrictions.

Lawyer Mark Johnson, sitting to Kobach’s right at the Dole Institute of Politics, said the Republican secretary of state was a central advocate for reform of voting law, undoubtedly popular, that ought to be declared unconstitutional for serving as a deterrent to participation in elections."

Law professors to participate in voting rights program

Thursday, September 08, 2016

LAWRENCE — The Dole Institute of Politics announced today the addition of a Constitution Day program on voting rights featuring Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and KU Law adjunct professor Mark P. Johnson.

The annual Constitution Day program is titled “Protecting Election Integrity, Voter Suppression, or Something Else?” and will take place at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13. It will feature a discussion between Johnson and Kobach on the Constitution and voting rights, including voter ID laws, proof of citizenship laws, the Interstate Crosscheck system and more. Stephen McAllister, KU Law professor and solicitor general of Kansas, will serve as the program’s moderator.

“Voting rights is in the news and in the courts all across the nation, and now it’s at the Dole Institute,” said Associate Director Barbara Ballard.  “This exciting panel will discuss voting rights, and we know the public will want to attend and ask their questions as well.”

The event will be free, open to the public and located at the Dole Institute. It is co-sponsored by the KU School of Law.

The Robert J. Dole Institute of Politics is dedicated to promoting political and civic participation as well as civil discourse in a bipartisan, philosophically balanced manner. It is located on KU’s West Campus and houses the Dole Archive and Special Collections. Through its robust public programming, congressional archive and museum, the Dole Institute strives to celebrate public serve and the legacy of U.S. Senator Bob Dole.

More information on all programs, as well as ongoing additions to the schedule, can be found on the Dole Institute’s website, www.doleinstitute.org.

Kansas Supreme Court asked to order grand jury on Kobach

"A former legislative candidate is asking the Kansas Supreme Court to force a grand jury investigation of Secretary of State Kris Kobach.

Steven X. Davis, a Lawrence Democrat, said Tuesday that he has asked the state’s highest court to require that the Douglas County District Court summon a grand jury. Davis said in a statement that the jury needs to investigate Kobach because of rumors that his office intentionally suppressed voter registration. Davis does say that his evidence is slim.

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Grand jury to investigate online voter registration

After Devon Weisenbach's wife's voter registration was not processed, he submitted a petition asking the Douglas County Court to appoint a grand jury to investigate the matter.

"'It's not a trial as we think of a normal trial. What a grand jury does is conduct an investigation to determine if there's enough evidence that some crime occurred,' said Mark Johnson, law lecturer at the University of Kansas.

State officials adopt rule allowing thousands to vote in federal races without proving citizenship

"A small band of Kansas officials hastily enacted a rule Tuesday to allow more than 17,000 people who haven’t provided proof of citizenship to vote in federal races.

The regulation affects individuals who registered to vote at Department of Motor Vehicle offices and comes in response to a federal court order. The rule was adopted at the last minute — the day before advance voting for the August primary is set to begin.

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