As court prepares to hear school funding case, voters may hold most of the cards

"The long-running school finance lawsuit Gannon v. Kansas will return to the state Supreme Court on Wednesday, marking the fourth time the justices have been asked to resolve the matter.

This time, though, the oral arguments before the court will coincide with a hotly contested political campaign in which the issue of school funding is driving many races for state legislative seats.

The arguments also come at a time when five of the seven Supreme Court justices are on the election ballot themselves.


Texas abortion decision could have Kansas implications

"News of the Supreme Court striking down Texas' strict regulations of abortion clinics may have a trickledown effect in Kansas. Texas rules require abortion providers to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals and forced clinics to meet hospital-like standards for outpatient care.

The nation's highest court held Monday that those regulations are medically unnecessary and unconstitutionally limit a woman's right to an abortion. Some law experts say that regulations in Kansas are quite similar.

Obscure 2005 law emerges as possible tactic in Kansas schools fight

"When the Kansas Supreme Court and state legislature faced off over school finance more than a decade ago, many lawmakers insisted that judges had overreached.

So much so that they passed a law banning courts from closing schools if the issue ever got to that point again.

And now that we’re there, with a June 30 deadline looming and the threat of a school shutdown real, some legislators insist judges should go back and abide by that 2005 law.


Gov. Kathleen Sebelius appointee penned anti-abortion Court of Appeals ruling

"Former Kansas Gov. Kathleen Sebelius is a foe in the eyes of anti-abortion advocates in Kansas, and yet it was a Sebelius appointee who issued the Kansas Court of Appeal’s anti-abortion minority opinion Friday.

Richard Levy, a professor of constitutional law at the University of Kansas, said lower court judges have less discretion to pursue personal predilections because they are bound by higher court rulings.

After 149 years, Kansas lawmakers still grappling with 14th Amendment

The 14th Amendment was one of three post-war amendments that were supposed to put the issues of slavery and racial discrimination to rest. It’s the one that says, among other things, that states may not deprive their citizens of life, liberty or property without due process of law, nor deny to any of them equal protection under the laws.


But today, 149 years later, issues that are embedded in the 14th Amendment continue to stir controversy in statehouses around the country, on issues ranging from abortion to gay rights, and from even voting rights to school finance.

Kansas Supreme Court strikes down judicial selection law, putting funding for courts in jeopardy

"In a case that threatens all funding for the entire state judicial branch, the Kansas Supreme Court on Wednesday struck down a new law that changes the way chief judges in the lower courts are selected.

In a 43-page opinion in the case of Solomon v. Kansas written by Justice Eric Rosen, the court upheld a lower court decision that said the new law violates the separation of powers doctrine as well as Article 3 of the state constitution, which gives the Supreme Court “general administrative authority over all courts in this state.”

Is it legal? How could it work? Legal experts say Trump would need to use 'most reviled' decision in Supreme Court history

"It is widely regarded as one of the most shameful episodes in America's history.

But the internment of Japanese citizens during WWII would be Donald Trump's best hope of passing his ban on Muslims entering the US.

Constitutional experts said that internment was the closest precedent that Trump could turn to were he to try and implement his policy - even though it would be 'constitutionally dead on arrival'.



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