U.S. Supreme Court justices appalled by details of Kansas murder cases

"The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday seemed likely to rule against three Kansas men who challenged their death sentences in what one justice called 'some of the most horrendous murders' he’s ever seen from the bench.


Kansas Solicitor General Stephen McAllister, who is also a professor at Kansas University’s School of Law, argued that requiring the state to conduct separate sentencing hearings would lead to inconsistent results and unfairly allow defendants to preview the state’s evidence."

For lawyers, it can be tough to be a ‘friend of the court’

A Washinton Post article regarding "amici curiae," or friends of the court, who argue difficult issues before the Supreme Court, featured Professor Stephen McAllister.

Aizenman wrote:

But Stephen McAllister did not hesitate when he got the call for a case the court heard last year. A law professor at the University of Kansas, he had already come before the court four times representing clients.

“Maybe there are people who feel they can afford to say no,” he said. “I certainly didn’t. It’s a great honor.”

Former adviser to the Bush administration visits campus

An article detailing former Bush administration adviser John Yoo's visit to campus featured Steve McAllister, professor of law.

Amin wrote:

The program was co-sponsored by the KU School of Law, and Constitutional Law Professor Stephen McAllister was instrumental in bringing Yoo to the University of Kansas. McAllister conducted an interview with Yoo that lasted roughly 40 minutes.


Subscribe to RSS - mcallister
Why KU
  • One-third of full-time faculty have written casebooks used at U.S. law schools
  • 2 KU law faculty were U.S. Supreme Court clerks
  • KU’s Project for Innocence: 33 conviction reversals since 2009
  • 7,300+ alumni live in all 50 states and 18 foreign countries
  • #18 “best value” law school in the nation — National Jurist Magazine
  • 12 interdisciplinary joint degrees
  • 27th nationwide for lowest debt at graduation. — U.S. News & World Report
  • 70 percent of upper-level law classes have 25 or fewer students
  • Nearly 800 employment interviews at law school, 2012-13
  • Top 25% for number of 2013 grads hired by the nation’s largest law firms
  • 20th: for number of law alumni promoted to partner at the 250 largest law firms