Thodos in Residence
Oct. 04, 08:00 am
Tesla Quartet
Oct. 04, 02:00 pm
Thodos in Residence
Oct. 05, 08:00 am
Thodos in Residence
Oct. 06, 08:00 am
Jayhawk Day
Oct. 06, 09:00 am

Late Night in the Phog
Oct. 09, 12:00 am
Soccer vs Baylor
Oct. 09, 07:00 pm
Soccer vs. Baylor
Oct. 09, 07:00 pm
Football vs Baylor
Oct. 10, 12:00 am
Volleyball vs Iowa State
Oct. 10, 12:00 am

University of Kansas law graduates outperform peers on bar exam

Friday, October 02, 2015

LAWRENCE – University of Kansas School of Law graduates in the Class of 2015 passed the bar examination in Kansas and Missouri at rates that far exceeded state averages. They also ranked first among all Kansas and Missouri law schools for performance on the Missouri exam.

KU graduates taking the Kansas bar exam for the first time in July 2015 achieved a 91.6 percent pass rate, surpassing by a staggering 10.6 percent the state pass rate of 81 percent.

Alumni performed even better in the state of Missouri, where 94.7 percent of KU test-takers passed the bar on their first attempt. That showing outpaces by 8 percent the state average of 86.7 percent. With this outcome, KU ranked No. 1 among all law schools in Kansas and Missouri whose graduates sat for the July 2015 bar exam in high numbers, including the University of Missouri, the University of Missouri-Kansas City, St. Louis University, Washington University in St. Louis and Washburn University.

“We are thrilled by the extraordinary success of our hard-working 2015 graduates,” said Stephen Mazza, dean of the law school. “Our students have consistently exceeded the state average when it comes to passing the bar exam – the essential first step for any graduate seeking to practice law.”

Twenty-two out of 24 first-time test-takers passed the Kansas bar, while 71 out of 75 passed the Missouri bar. While in most years the majority of KU students sit for the bar exam in Kansas, the 2015 class opted for the Missouri exam at a higher rate. This anomaly was driven by Kansas’ pending adoption of the Uniform Bar Exam, which will allow graduates who took the bar in Missouri to become licensed in Kansas by transferring their scores.

The bar examination is a test intended to determine whether candidates are qualified to practice law in a given jurisdiction. The bar exam is administered twice a year, in February and July. Most students graduate in May and take the summer exam.

The Kansas Board of Law Examiners does not provide details about the performance of other law schools.

KU Law to host Midwestern Law and Economics Association Conference

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas School of Law will welcome legal scholars to Lawrence this week for the annual meeting of the Midwestern Law and Economics Association. Scholars will explore the economic aspects of current issues in contract law, tort law, corporate law, tax law and health care law, covering topics ranging from executive compensation to IRS reform to inequality and family law.

“This is the second time we've hosted MLEA at KU, and we are looking forward to having the group back this year,” said conference organizer Christopher Drahozal, associate dean for research and faculty development and John M. Rounds Professor of Law at KU. “The conference provides KU faculty and students the chance to interact with law and economics scholars not only from the Midwest but from all over the United States and the world.”

The conference will be held Friday and Saturday, Oct. 2-3, at Green Hall on the Lawrence campus.

MLEA is a group of scholars who study the intersection between economics and the law. Members have gathered annually since 2001 to share their work and exchange ideas.

Drahozal’s work focuses on dispute resolution with an emphasis on arbitration. He has written multiple books and articles on commercial arbitration and has presented on the subject in Europe, Asia, Canada, and before Congress and state legislatures.

 Visit the KU Law website for a complete schedule and list of presenters.

Environmental law professor wins interdisciplinary starter grant

Monday, September 14, 2015

LAWRENCE – The Commons, a partnership at the University of Kansas that encourages cross-disciplinary research and learning, awarded $30,000 to KU faculty research groups in the spring 2015 cycle of its Interdisciplinary Starter Grant.

Each research team was awarded $10,000 to launch its interdisciplinary projects in 2015-2016.

Rachel Krause, School of Public Affairs and Administration; Ward Lyles, School of Architecture, Design & Planning, and Uma Outka, School of Law, received funds for their research, which looks at how local energy transitions can be leveraged to advance local social justice objectives. This research project Localized Energy and Climate Adaptation: Advancing Community-Scale Social Justice Goals is situated at the nexus of two approaches to climate change research — mitigation and adaptation — and explores their intersection through a social equity lens.

Michael Vitevitch, psychology, and Arienne Dwyer, anthropology and Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities, will examine how the emerging field of network science can be applied across disciplines. Using the principles of network science, researchers examine complex systems and the relationships that exist between individuals in that system (e.g., people in a social group, animals in an ecosystem, etc.). A two-day workshop in spring 2016 will bring leading researchers to demonstrate how network science has been applied to examine language, the arts, the humanities and the sciences. Participants can also learn how to apply these analysis techniques in their own work.

Mary Anne Jordan, visual art, and Caroline Chaboo, ecology & evolutionary biology and the Biodiversity Institute, will launch a study on indigenous dyes in the Sacred Valley of Peru. Jordan and Chaboo will expand their collaboration with Nilda Callañaupa, a master weaver and director of the Center for Traditional Textiles, to document the biodiversity of the region as it relates to traditional dyeing practices and investigate the biological and cultural implications for teaching and preserving traditional practices.

The Commons will host the next round of Starter Grants in Fall 2015 with an information session for all interested KU faculty at 2 p.m. Sept. 23.

The Commons is a collaboration of the Biodiversity Institute, the Hall Center for the Humanities, and the Spencer Museum of Art. Its mission is to bring together scholars and students from the sciences, humanities, and arts to explore the reciprocal relationships between natural and cultural systems. Interdisciplinary Starter Grants are made possible through the support of the Office of Research.

Kansas Court of Appeals to commemorate Constitution Day with session at KU

Tuesday, September 15, 2015
Kansas Court of Appeals in session at KU

LAWRENCE — A three-judge panel of the Kansas Court of Appeals will hear five cases Sept. 22 at the Kansas Union at the University of Kansas as part of the court’s observance of Constitution Day.

The court will hear cases at 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. in Alderson Auditorium.

Judges Patrick D. McAnany and Michael B. Buser of Overland Park and Judge Steve Leben of Fairway will hear the cases. Leben has been designated the presiding judge for the hearings.

“The cases we will hear at KU were chosen because we think they present interesting constitutional issues for students,” Leben said. “The constitutional rights we all share are tested daily in America’s courts in cases like these.”

Several of the cases involve disputes about a defendant’s rights under the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The Fourth Amendment guarantees our freedom from “unreasonable searches and seizures” and provides that search warrants be issued only on “probable cause.” Under what courts call the exclusionary rule, evidence that was obtained illegally — in violation of the Fourth Amendment — is generally excluded from the trial, although there is an exception to that rule when police officers had a reasonable, good-faith belief they were acting legally.

Attorneys for each side will have an opportunity to present arguments to the judges, and the judges will have a chance to ask questions. After the hearings, the court will take each case under consideration and will issue a written decision at a later date, usually within 60 days.

After each session, the judges will be available to talk to students. The KU School of Law will also host a one-hour “Ask the Judges” open forum for students and the public at 12:30 p.m. in Alderson Auditorium. The judges will provide some background about the U.S. Constitution and the court system and will answer questions.

The Kansas Court of Appeals hears cases throughout the state, with monthly hearing dockets regularly scheduled in Topeka, Wichita and Kansas City. During 2015, the court has also had hearings in Beloit, Chanute, Garden City, Lawrence, Overland Park and Paola, and it will have hearings in Hutchinson in November. 

As part of its observance of Constitution Day, which commemorates the signing of the U.S. Constitution by a majority of delegates to the Constitutional Convention on Sept. 17, 1787, the Kansas Court of Appeals schedules September dockets at Kansas colleges and universities. In addition to the panel at KU, the court this year will have three-judge panels hearing cases at Wichita State University and Kansas State University.

There are 14 judges on the Kansas Court of Appeals. In 2014, the court resolved appeals in 1,861 cases, including 1,295 in which the court issued a formal written opinion.

The five cases to be heard at KU:

9 a.m.

State of Kansas v. Michelle Canfield, Appeal from Shawnee County
Police entered Michelle Canfield’s Topeka home uninvited to arrest her on a warrant that called for her arrest. They found methamphetamine on her person, and she was convicted of a possession charge. She appeals the district court’s denial of her motion to suppress the evidence found on her that day. She alleges that no recognized exception to the requirement for a search warrant authorized the police to enter her home when a man answered the door and said he wasn’t sure whether she was at home. The state of Kansas contends that the officers had authority to enter the home both because they had been called to check on the welfare of Canfield’s children and because they had probable cause to believe that Canfield, for whom they had an arrest warrant, was in the home.

State of Kansas v. Cornelious Jones, Appeal from Labette County
After police in Parsons made a traffic stop, a passenger in the car ran away on foot. Officers arrested him, took a cell phone from his pocket and then looked on the phone for texts without obtaining a search warrant. The information found led to charges against Cornelious Jones for possession and intent to sell illegal drugs. The district court ruled that the warrantless cell-phone search was illegal under a 2014 United States Supreme Court ruling, Riley v. California, which determined that the data on a cell phone of a person arrested cannot be searched without a warrant. The state of Kansas has appealed. It concedes that the search was illegal but argues that the evidence found should still be allowed in the case against Jones because the search occurred before the Riley decision and the officers acted in good faith.

10:30 a.m.

State of Kansas v. Justin Rice, Appeal from Shawnee County
After Justin Rice pled guilty to several crimes committed in Topeka, including solicitation to commit aggravated robbery, the district court found that the crimes involved the “use” of a deadly weapon, which made Rice subject to a requirement that he register under the Kansas Offender Registration Act. Rice claims on appeal that the district court violated his constitutional right to a jury trial under the Sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution. He cites a 2000 United States Supreme Court case, Apprendi v. New Jersey, which said that “any fact that increases the penalty for a crime beyond the prescribed statutory maximum must be submitted to a jury and proved beyond a reasonable doubt.” The state argues that offender registration is for public safety, not part of a defendant’s punishment.

2 p.m.

State of Kansas v. David Wasylk, Appeal from Lyon County
In a case from Emporia, David Wasylk was convicted of four counts of manufacture of methamphetamine and several other drug offenses based on evidence found in a residence by officers who had a search warrant. The district court found that the search warrant shouldn’t have been issued because the information in it came primarily from a single informant without sufficient corroboration. But the district court allowed the evidence to be used against Wasylk anyway because the court found that the officers acted in good faith. On appeal, along with several other issues, the defendant claims that the good-faith exception to the rule that normally excludes illegally obtained evidence should not have been applied.

State of Kansas v. Tiffany C. Hubbard, Appeal from Douglas County
Lawrence resident Tiffany Hubbard appeals her conviction for distribution of cocaine and other offenses. The charges were based on four drug buys and evidence found in her home. At trial, as proof that she lived there, the state presented her license to operate an in-home daycare facility. Hubbard contends that this evidence was irrelevant and prejudicial to her, leading the jury to convict on weak and circumstantial evidence because of concern that children were present when drug transactions may have taken place. She also argues that the prosecuting attorney made improper and prejudicial statements to the jury in closing argument; that the district court violated her constitutional right under the Sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution to present a complete defense in her jury trial (she wasn’t allowed to present some negative information about a witness who was cooperating with the state); and that the district court violated her constitutional right to be present at her own trial by holding a pretrial hearing without her presence.

Read the complete case briefs and judges' bios on the KU Law website

University mourns death of law student Jimmy Gorman

Friday, September 04, 2015

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas community is mourning the death of a second-year School of Law student, James Gorman. He died Sept. 2 at his home in Lawrence. Gorman was 23.

“I am saddened to learn of the passing of one of our talented and promising law students,” said Chancellor Bernadette-Gray Little. “On behalf of the entire university community, I extend my sympathy to James Gorman’s family, friends and those in the School of Law who knew him as a student, classmate and colleague.”

Gorman, originally from Leawood, was a Rice Scholar attending the KU School of Law on a full-tuition scholarship awarded to students with outstanding academic credentials and proven leadership abilities.

He was a staff editor on the Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy and was active in the Student Bar Association. Gorman also served as an International Dissertation Writing Fellow, assisting KU’s doctor of juridical science candidates. He spent the summer as a legal intern with the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

“The KU Law community offers its deepest sympathies to the friends and family of this accomplished young man,” said Stephen Mazza, dean of the law school. “Jimmy was an outstanding student with strong leadership skills and a promising future in the law. He had also exhibited a caring spirit in service to others through volunteer work in his community.”

Services will be noon Tuesday, Sept. 8, at Church of the Nativity, 3700 W. 119th St., in Leawood. 

Law school alumna named KU Woman of Distinction

Thursday, August 27, 2015

Women of Distinction Calendar 2015-2016LAWRENCE — Twenty-five women with ties to the University of Kansas are featured in the 2015-2016 Women of Distinction calendar. The Emily Taylor Resource Center for Women & Gender Equity, which produces the poster-sized calendar, will host a reception to honor the women and their achievements Monday, Aug. 31.

The women represent KU students, faculty, staff, administrators and alumnae who have distinguished achievements in their efforts at the university or in their community.

“It is so important to recognize and celebrate women's contributions to our campus and the world beyond,” said Kathy Rose-Mockry, director of the Emily Taylor center. “This year, we honor accomplished women who excel in their disciplines while serving as role models and mentors to inspire others to break barriers and reach for the stars.” 

Nine current students, seven alumnae and nine faculty and staff are featured on the calendar. Five areas of service and distinction also receive special attention through the calendar: Disability advocates, Hawks for health, women in flight, mentors making a difference and sisters in service.

A reception to acknowledge this year’s featured women and their contributions will be from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 31, in the ballroom of the Kansas Union. The public is welcome to attend.

The Women of Distinction calendars are free, although donations are accepted. They are available at several locations, including the KU Bookstore, Jayhawk Ink and the Emily Taylor Center, 4024 Wescoe Hall.   

Individuals featured on the 2015-2016 Women of Distinction Calendar and selected achievements and honors:

Emily Beck 
Doctoral candidate, bioengineering. Hometown: Manhattan, Kansas
National Science Foundation graduate research fellowship (2011)
National Science Foundation GK-12 Fellowship (2011)
Capitol Graduate Research Summit Kansas Bioscience Award (2014)

Prajnaparamita “Prajna” Dhar, Ph.D. Assistant professor, chemical and petroleum engineering
Research featured on the NIH Directors Blog and on the cover of Soft Matter, a Royal Society of Chemistry publication
School of Engineering Miller Scholar Award recipient
Selected for the doctoral dissertation award

Tammara Durham, Ed. D. Vice provost for student affairs and interim vice provost of undergraduate studies
Leadership in in enhancing campus response to student needs 
Work with student leaders, and in particular, Student Senate
Selected to serve as a mentor for the Hesselbein Global Academy, a leadership training program

Amy Long, M.A. Associate director, Student Involvement and Leadership Center
Outstanding Woman Staff Member, KU (2014)
Big Sister through Big Brothers Big Sisters of Douglas County for six years
Helped in the creation the KUnity, a social justice-focused emerging leaders retreat for greek members

Miranda Wagner B.A., economics, KU (2015). Hometown: Shawnee
Student body vice president (2014-15)
Alternative Breaks finance coordinator (2013-14)
Spring Breaks co-coordinator (2012-13)

Paige Whiteside
Senior, biology. Hometown: Jefferson City, Tennessee
Big XII Council on Black Student Government, vice chair (2014-15)
Mordean Taylor Archer Most Outstanding Council Member of the Year Award (2015)
EMMPWR (Exposing Multicultural Males to Personal Wellness Resources) research project assistant (January 2015-present)

Elizabeth Weis
Senior, marketing and supply chain management; Business School Honors Program. Hometown: Leawood
Head teaching assistant for statistics (DSCI 202), School of Business
Dean Neeli Bendapudi Scholarship recipient (2015)
KU representative at the Kansas Hunger Dialogue

Disability Advocates

Martha Hodgesmith, J.D.
Associate director, Research and Training Center on Independent Living, KU Life Span Institute
B.A., anthropology, sociology and women’s studies (1974); J.D. (1978)
Kansas Women Attorneys Association - Jennie Mitchell Kellogg Achievement Award (2005)
Women Attorneys Association of Topeka – Chief Justice Kay McFarland Award (2012)
Kansas Bar Association – Distinguished Government Service Award

Ranita Wilks, CESP
Peer counseling specialist and Youth Employment Program coordinator, Independence Inc.
B.S., Journalism, KU (1998).
Mentoring Matters Award-Kansas Youth Empowerment Academy (2014)
Michael Lechner Advocacy Award-Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns (2013)
Appointed to the Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns and State Rehab Council of Kansas

Jean Ann Summers, Ph.D.
Research professor, Life Span Institute; research director, Research & Training Center on Independent Living; director of research, Family Research Unit of the Beach Center
Ph.D., special education, KU (1987); B.G.S., applied behavioral science, KU
Has taken leadership role in generating more than $20 million in grants to develop support for people with disabilities and their families as well as enhance training to professionals during her 40-year tenure at KU 
Has volunteered to help develop funding for various family support organizations, including those serving diverse and low-income communities
Has nearly 100 publications in peer-reviewed journals, books and book chapters on families and disability, young children, fatherhood, self-determination and other research areas

Katerina Birge (not pictured)
Graduate student, public administration, University of Colorado. Hometown: Denver.
B.S., Latin American studies, KU (2011)
Co-founder/president of KU Ablehawks
Co-founder of Project Hope
Columnist, Creaky Joints, A Paso Lento

Hawks for Health

Leigh Loving
Graduate student, public health, Columbia University. Hometown: McPherson
B.S., biology with an emphasis in genetics, KU (2015)
Jayhawk Health Initiative, founder
Rhodes Scholar finalist (2015), Truman Scholar finalist (2014)
Kathleen McCluskey-Fawcett Outstanding Contribution Award (2014), Outstanding Woman Student in Leadership (2014)

Rajvi Shah
B.S., neurobiology, minor in psychology, pre-medicine concentration. Hometown: Stilwell
Honors Program Student Council, co-president
Student Health Advisory Board (Student Senate) voting board member
IBM Thomas J. Watson Memorial Fund Scholar

Women in Flight

Emily Arnold, Ph.D.
Assistant professor of aerospace engineering
NASA Earth and Space fellow (2012, 2013)
Amelia Earhart Fellow (2010, 2011)
NASA Group Achievement Award (2011)

Brooke Reid
Junior, aerospace engineering. Hometown: Cota de Caza, California
Self Engineering Leadership Fellow
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, KU Branch, president (2014-15)
Vincent Muirhead Award for Leadership (April 2015)

Lauren Schumacher
Doctoral student, aerospace engineering. Hometown: Rolla, Missouri
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Kansas representative for National Congressional Visit Day (2013)
KU University Scholars Program (Class of 2014)
Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) KU: vice president for undergraduates (2013-15)

Mentors Making a Difference

Grecia Rucoba
Senior, accounting; Business School Honors Program. Hometown: Anthony
Multicultural Business Scholars Program
Megan E. Taylor Memorial Scholarship recipient (fall 2014)

Dale Urie, Ph.D.
Senior lecturer, Humanities and Western Civilization Program
Fulbright German Studies Seminar, Berlin (summer 2011)
Outstanding Woman Educator, KU (2010)
Excellence in Teaching Award, KU Center for Teaching Excellence (2007)

Lisa Browning
Enrollment and student services coordinator, KU Edwards Campus
Helped to build student and enrollment services for the KU Edwards Campus, collaborating with KU Lawrence
Advocate for all Edwards Campus students, especially international students and veterans
Developed the MetroKC program, which serves more than 250 students in Greater Kansas City

Cindy Lynn
Education coordinator, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, Office of Graduate Affairs
Graduate student, African and African-American Studies
Ethel Bohning Single Mother of the Year Award, KU (2007)
Boy Scouts of America National Outstanding Cubmaster (2015)
KU Advocacy Corps, vice president

Ashley Kruger, M.S.E.
Career adviser, KU Business Career Services Center
Spearheaded a successful overhaul for the School of Business Mentorship Program
Overhauled web presence of BCSC services and resources (spring 2015)
Initiated an event to address the unique career needs of LGBTQ+ students (April 2015)

Sisters in Service

Shelby Webb
Graduate student, public health, emphasis in epidemiology, KU Medical Center. Hometown: Ottawa
B.S., biology with a concentration in genetics, KU (2015)
Alternative Breaks, co-director (2014-15)
Board of Class Officers, Campanile Award Winner (2015)
College of Liberal Arts & Sciences student senator (2013-15) 

Ally Briggs
B.S., biochemistry, minor in leadership studies, KU (2015). Hometown: Ottawa
Alternative Breaks, co-director (2014-15)
Kansas Women’s Leadership Institute graduate (2014)
Phi Delta Epsilon pre-medical fraternity, community service chair

Laura Lyndall Fagen
B.S., theatre and journalism - strategic communications, KU (2015). Hometown: Wichita
She’s The First* {KU}, founder and president
Her Campus KU, president
Center for Community Outreach, communications director

Erin Calhoun
Senior, behavioral neuroscience. Hometown: Naperville, Illinois
Chrysikou Cognitive Neuroscience Lab research assistant
Northwestern Memorial Health Care pre-medical intern (2014)
Center for Community Outreach managing director (2014-2015); development director (2013-2014).

New edition of international trade law textbook addresses rapidly expanding issues

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

LAWRENCE — On the surface, international trade law may seem like a specialized topic that affects only a niche subsection of the population. But as international headlines surrounding trade sanctions against Iran and negotiation of the Trans Pacific Partnership and alleged currency manipulation by China demonstrate, the field has grown exponentially and is felt in daily life around the world. To that end, Raj Bhala, one of the world’s foremost experts in international trade law, has authored the fourth edition of International Trade Law: An Interdisciplinary, Non-Western Textbook.

The seminal work, originally published in 1996, has grown as the field has evolved in the last 20 years. Originally a single, 800-page volume, the text is for the first time a two-volume, 100-chapter, nearly 3,000-page comprehensive analysis of international trade law. It became available Aug. 18, in time for the 2015-16 academic year.

The book is a “textbook” in the classic sense. Rather than rely on excerpts of readings, as do “casebooks,” Bhala researched and wrote almost the entirety of both volumes. The work is a synthesis of the enduring, the contemporary and the avant-garde. It embodies time-honored precepts, highlights their modern-day relevance and anticipates the world trading system over the next 50 years, when his students will practice law.

“Since 1996, which was just after NAFTA and the World Trade Organization were born, the field of international trade law has greatly broadened and deepened. The broadening has come in that the field is now viewed at two levels, both theoretical and practical. The deepening is largely because of the proliferation of items put on the international trade agenda,” said Bhala, associate dean for international and comparative law and Rice Distinguished Professor at the University of Kansas School of Law.

The textbook is separated into two parts, fundamental obligations and remedies and preferences. The volumes can be used as part of a two-semester, yearlong course or either could be used individually as a single-semester class. Part one examines moral, economic, historical, institutional, adjudicatory and legal foundations of free trade as well as customs law and trade rules about three critical sectors: agriculture, services and intellectual property. Part two explores remedies against “unfair” trade, unilateral trade remedies, national security, free trade agreements, trade and labor, trade and environment, and preferences for poor countries.

One of the first textbooks on the topic, International Trade Law and its ensuing editions are in use in more than 100 law schools across the United States and the world and have been translated into several languages, including Vietnamese. Nineteen top international trade scholars and experts from the United States, Australia, China, India, Ireland, Mexico, New Zealand, Nigeria, United Arab Emirates and the United Kingdom have endorsed the fourth edition.

“In my experience, few books set a first-rate standard for students and teachers alike. This textbook does. Its interdisciplinary, non-Western orientation, coupled with its coverage of time-honored precepts and contemporary issues, is a novel and timely synthesis,” said Jagdish N. Bhagwati, University Professor of Economics, Law, and International Affairs at Columbia University.

As implied by the book’s title, international trade law is a discipline requiring knowledge of the laws, customs and cultures of nations around the world. Bhala said the text, published by LexisNexis, is called a non-Western book because it is intended to help prepare students to work in a changed global society.

“In choosing cases and illustrations, the book is tenacious in using non-Western examples,” Bhala said. “It’s not a Euro-centric or Washington insider-centric book. The reason is the non-Western world is the one in which our students will be practicing. They will work in a world in which India is the largest free-market democracy and most religiously diverse country, in which China’s rise is undeniable but its future uncertain, and in which European economies aren’t dominant, as Greece’s recent troubles demonstrate. It’s imperative to prepare students for that future, even if they plan to work completely domestically. What happens ‘over there’ already affects them ‘right here’ and besides, there is plenty of empirical evidence that people change jobs and careers multiple times.”

Bhala gives credit to students for the book’s success as well. Research assistants who have worked on the book’s four editions are credited. Those students have gone on to practice law across the world, in centers like Bangkok, Brussels, Dubai, Hong Kong, Mexico City, New York, Tokyo, Chicago, Houston and Washington, D.C. Some have also earned highly prestigious clerkships on the United States Court of International Trade in New York and Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington, D.C.

“In working to convey the breadth and depth of a field as complex as international trade law, I have been extremely fortunate to work with fantastic research assistants here at KU Law,” Bhala said. “I love producing something for students to learn from, that earns them a reputation for being trained at a world-class level. I absolutely could not do it without them, and to see them flourish after our time together is an abiding joy.”


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