KU law professor says language compelling Kobach produce documents unusually strong

"A law professor at the University of Kansas reviewed the decision handed down by U.S. Magistrate Judge James P. O’Hara this week compelling Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach to produce documents in a suit regarding the National Voting Rights Act.

One of those documents is one photographed by the Associated Press in Kobach’s hand as he was getting ready to walk into a meeting with then President-elect Donald Trump.

KU Law Professor Says Court Is Giving Legislature One Last Chance To Fix School Funding Adequacy

"A Kansas University Law Professor says that the Kansas Supreme Court appears to be giving the Kansas Legislature one last chance to fix school funding adequacy.

'The court found the current school funding provision to be unconstitutional under the Kansas Constitution,' said Lumen 'Lou' Mulligan, Director of the Shook, Hardy & Bacon Center for Excellence in Advocacy. 'It stayed the enforcement of an order until the end of June.' 

The current law that gives schools in Kansas block grant funding is due to expire, anyway.

Law Prof Part of Effort to Improve International Arbitration Cases

"In international arbitration cases, billions of dollars and the validity of government regulations can be at stake, so it is imperative parties are able to choose the best arbitrator to settle their disputes. A University of Kansas law professor is part of a project working to improve the information available to parties in such cases, making the process fairer and more efficient and increasing the diversity of people deciding international arbitration cases.

Day in the Life: Bruce Hopkins gets third law degree at age 72

"Bruce Hopkins is a professor of the practice at the University, teaching students on nonprofit organizations and law while practicing that same law in Kansas City. Hopkins boasts almost 50 years of experience within nonprofit and tax-exempt law, working with a wide range of nonprofit organizations.

In 2013, at the age of 72, Hopkins decided to enroll back in classes at the University to pursue his third law degree.

'I saw this degree as a goal. I saw it as an objective,' Hopkins said."

KU law professor receives thrid law degree from KU

"Four more years of school after college. Passing the bar. Many would consider getting a law degree impressive. But how about getting three law degrees?

It seems University of Kansas law professor Bruce Hopkins can't get enough of learning the art of law.

...

'I had a number of times when students that I was either teaching, or had taught in the past,' Hopkins said, 'was now in class with them.'

Hopkins, who turns 76 next month, got his second law degree just a couple years after receiving his first, in the early 70s."

University alumna's run-in with the law brought her to run her own animal law practice

"The then-Shawnee resident Katie Barnett was at home when the police knocked on her door. They asked to see her dog. She was scared, but she was also pretty sure she hadn't broken the law.

...

Retired law professor William Westerbeke, who taught Barnett during her time at the University, said animal law is something of a novelty interest among law students. Although it’s possible to start a specialty practice, few people are able to carve a niche for themselves as Barnett has.

Judge Gorsuch grilled on possible conflicts of interest

"Judge Neil Gorsuch is facing questions about conflict of interest from senators on both sides of the aisle about nearly 1,000 cases the Supreme Court nominee recused himself from hearing during his time on the circuit court.

...

Lumen Mulligan, an associate dean at the University of Kansas School of Law, told The Washington Times that nearly 1,000 recusals is 'definitely more than average' in the 10th Circuit.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - in the news
Why KU
  • Top 25 among public law schools — Business Insider
  • KU’s Project for Innocence: 2 wrongfully convicted citizens serving life sentences freed in 2015
  • 7,700+ alumni in all 50 states, D.C., 3 U.S. territories, and 20 foreign countries
  • 91 percent overall employment rate for Class of 2015 – top 23.3 percent nationally
  • 23rd in the nation for most-improved employment rates
  • One-third of full-time faculty have written casebooks and treatises
  • 25th nationwide for lowest debt at graduation
  • 21st: “Best Schools for Practical Training”
  • 77 percent of upper-level law classes have 25 or fewer students
  • National Champions: 2016 National Native American Law Students Association Moot Court Competition
  • #19 moot court program in the nation
  • #17 “best value” law school in the nation — National Jurist Magazine