Obscure 2005 law emerges as possible tactic in Kansas schools fight

"When the Kansas Supreme Court and state legislature faced off over school finance more than a decade ago, many lawmakers insisted that judges had overreached.

So much so that they passed a law banning courts from closing schools if the issue ever got to that point again.

And now that we’re there, with a June 30 deadline looming and the threat of a school shutdown real, some legislators insist judges should go back and abide by that 2005 law.

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Constitutional Crisis Possible, According to KU Law Professor

"A University of Kansas Law Professor says that if the Kansas Legislature does not reconvene in special session before the end of the month, we will have a constitutional crisis.

'Under our theory of government, hearkening all the way back to the 1803 U.S. Supreme Court case of Marbury v. Madison, which I imagine most of us studied in high school civics, it’s the high court that has the duty to declare what the law is,' said Professor Lumen 'Lou' Mulligan. Mulligan is the Director of the Shook, Hardy & Bacon Center for Excellence in Advocacy at KU.

UO Today with Maxine Burkett and Elizabeth Kronk Warner

Maxine Burkett, Law, University of Hawai'i, and Elizabeth Kronk Warner, Law, University of Kansas, talk about how climate change impacts indigenous communities on Pacific Islands and in the Arctic. They discuss the role law can play in planning for adaptation to loss of resources and land. Burkett and Warner were keynote speakers at the UO's Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples Symposium, addressing tribal sovereignty, traditional knowledges, and climate-induced change among indigenous peoples in the U.S.

Exploring How Cities Can Switch To A Low-Carbon Energy Grid

"A law professor from the University of Kansas has explored innovative approaches for cities to switch to a low-carbon energy grid.

Uma Outka, an associate professor of law at the University of Kansas, is the author behind Cities and the Low-Carbon Grid, an upcoming article in the journal Environmental Law. The paper details innovative approaches cities and communities can use to cut carbon emissions, and how these efforts will affect energy governance in years to come.

KU law students bring home championship in Moot Court competition

The University is used to acknowledging all sorts of championships in various sports, but another University team just brought home a championship in something a little less known.

Law students Ashley Akers, from Casper, Wyo., and Maureen Orth, from Prairie Villiage, earned first place last weekend at this year’s National Native American Law Students Association Moot Court Competition, which took place at Michigan State University.

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