Lawyers Ready to Move Forward With Cases Against Saudi Arabia Over 9/11

The Senate voted to override President Barack Obama’s veto of a bill that allows families of 9/11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia, which means lawyers have started to move ahead with cases already pending in court:

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But what challenges do the plaintiffs face? The families and victims have sued across the country, but 'consolidated into one suit in the Southern District of New York.' Lawyers have admitted that the 9,000 plaintiffs face an uphill battle:

Trump, Clinton Can Take Lessons From State Tax Changes

"The impact of tax changes on the state level could provide valuable insight for Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump as they flesh out their own proposals.

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Kansas has had to pay for the revenue losses from its tax cuts with reductions in spending on education and government services, said Martin B. Dickinson, the Robert A. Schroeder distinguished professor emeritus of law at the University of Kansas School of Law.

For Native American women with breast cancer, finding quality medical services a difficult task

"Deer, who is part of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation of Oklahoma, is now cancer-free. But throughout the process and during her diagnosis, she had access to quality medical help. However, she said this is not always the case with Native American women.

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'Most Native American women that experience cancer do not have top healthcare,' Deer said.

Deer said she thinks the problem is a result of limited access to health facilities.

Chinese-backed charity may be violating U.S. law, tax specialists say

“A New York educational charity affiliated with a Chinese company may have violated rules governing tax-exempt organizations in the United States, tax specialists say.


The Council for American Culture and Education Inc was set up in 2009 on behalf of Chinese for-profit school operator Dipont Education Management Group, according to the two consultants who created the charity. Thomas Benson and Stephen Gessner later ceded control of CACE to Dipont, according to Gessner.

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Death penalty cases a factor behind efforts to oust justices

"Family members of the Carr brothers’ victims came away stunned after listening to the Kansas Supreme Court justices dissect the appeals of their loved ones’ killers in 2013.

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Reversing rulings 'is what the United States Supreme Court is supposed to do,' University of Kansas School of Law professor Lumen Mulligan said. 'That the system works is not a strike against the system.'

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Override of Veto on 9-11 Suits is a Significant Change, Says KU Professor

"Congress voted to override a veto by President Barack Obama for the first time on Wednesday. The legislation would allow families with members killed on 9-11 to sue Saudi Arabia for its role in the attacks.

'It’s quite dramatic just in that sense alone, not to mention the nature of the legislation and the position of Saudi Arabia,' said University of Kansas associate dean for international and comparative law Raj Bhala."

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