Kansas legislature attempts to redefine public record

"Under Kansas Senate Bill 361, the definition of the term 'public record' would change, possibly blurring the line between public and private.

'{Under the new law} a public record is recorded information that a public employee makes or keeps or possesses pursuant to his or her officials duties and that relates to the public business of a public agency,' said Mike Kautsch, law professor at the University of Kansas.

Native American judge considered for Supreme Court nomination

"The first Native American woman to be appointed to the federal bench is being discussed as a possible nominee for the Supreme Court. In 2014, Diane Humetewa was unanimously confirmed to become a judge for the U.S. District Court for Arizona.

If nominated, Humetewa would become the first Native American in the Supreme Court, a change that one University of Kansas law professor says would be helpful with the type of cases the court hears.

Your Turn: Independent judiciary serves all

"To some of us, whether we are in government or as citizens, the Kansas Supreme Court’s recent actions striking down the 2015 school-finance scheme could be seen as a wrongful power grab. Nothing could be further from the truth. The independence of the judiciary is not maintained for the benefit of the judges. It is for us — free citizens of a democratic republic governed under rule of law — for whom the courts stand open as fair and impartial tribunals."

A Kansas man who spent nearly 16 years in prison for a killing his brother later admitted to testified for a measure that would require law enforcement to record some interrogations

 "A Kansas man who spent nearly 16 years in prison for a killing his brother later admitted to testified for a measure that would require law enforcement to record some interrogations.

...

Alice Craig, Bledsoe's attorney with the University of Kansas' Paul E. Wilson Project for Innocence, supports the interrogation recordings.

'We cannot say 16 years later how that would have impacted the investigation, but it could not have hurt,' Craig said."

A Case for Innocence: Students, non-profits work to protect rights of accused

"This is the scene inside the Paul E. Wilson Project for Innocence and Post-Conviction Remedies. All those files represent the life of a person in a Kansas correctional facility. It is those files that law students will be pouring over to determine if they can make a case to win that person a new trial and another chance at freedom or, at least, a more fair sentence - if it's warranted.

‘Truth is stranger than fiction’ for LSHS grad

"Oliver Burnette’s reality is a constant reminder for him that even well-intentioned laws and the pursuit of justice can sometimes go extremely wrong.

Burnette, a 1990 graduate of Lee’s Summit High School, is the executive director of the not-for-profit Midwest Innocence Project (MIP). The Kansas City-based organization investigates and litigates cases of those wrongfully convicted of a crime in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa and Arkansas.

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