Sue the Bank? You May Get Your Shot

"The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is moving toward new rules giving borrowers more rights to sue banks and credit-card companies, the agency's latest attempt to shift the balance of power to consumers from financial institutions.


The proposals under consideration would ban companies from including arbitration clauses that block class-action lawsuits in their consumer contracts for a broad range of financial products.


TPP Should Alarm Gulf States as US Turns to Pacific Rim

"On Monday, 12 Pacific Rim countries, including the United States, reached a consensus on the wording and subject matter of the TPP free trade agreement.

'This TPP ought to send shockwaves across the Gulf, because… it is showing that the United States is serious about re-balancing its focus out of the Middle East and towards the Asia Pacific region,' Raj Bhala, who is also a University of Kansas Law Professor, said."


Kansas A.G. Derek Schmidt: 'State has a very strong argument' in Carr brothers case

"Carr, along with his brother, Reginald, had been arrested as suspects in a crime spree that included the abduction, sexual assault and murder of four people in an abandoned soccer field in Wichita. The brothers were charged, convicted and sentenced to die for the crimes.

Fifteen years later, the fate of the Carr brothers remains irresolute. On Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear two hours of oral arguments in which the state of Kansas will attempt to convince the nation’s high court that the Kansas Supreme Court erred in vacating the brothers’ death sentences.

Carr cases to be heard by a U.S. Supreme Court increasingly skeptical of the death penalty

"On the final day of a U.S. Supreme Court term that will long be remembered for legalizing same-sex marriage, two justices boldly and bluntly challenged the constitutionality of the death penalty in America.

Dissenting from the majority in Glossip v. Gross, a case centered on Oklahoma’s use of the drug midazolam in executions, Justice Stephen Breyer wrote June 29 that “the death penalty, in and of itself, now likely constitutes a legally prohibited ‘cruel and unusual punishment.’ ” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg concurred with Breyer’s dissent.

KU Prof and Kobach Wrangle over Voter ID Law

"Kansas adopted a voter ID mandate in 2011, requiring all voters in the state to show a picture ID. But not everyone is pleased with the measure, notes The Topeka Capital-Journal. Last week a law professor from the University of Kansas and Secretary of State Kris Kobach clashed over the measure. The two sharply disagreed over the likelihood that illegal immigrants would come out of hiding and risk arrest in order to vote.

Fight Over Kansas Court Funding Attracts National Attention - KPR

"A legal fight over funding for Kansas courts has attracted national attention. At issue is a state law that changes the way chief judges are selected. A subsequent budget bill stipulated that the Kansas court system would lose all of its funding if the judicial selection law was struck down. A district court has struck down the law. That decision is on hold while there’s an appeal, but it still leaves questions about funding for the courts.

Fight Over Kansas Court Funding Attracts National Attention - KMUW

"A legal fight in Kansas over funding for the courts is attracting national headlines and attention from advocacy groups outside the state. At issue is a law that changes the way chief judges are selected. A later budget bill was tied to the law.

As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, that means if the judicial selection law is struck down, the Kansas court system’s funding is also eliminated.


Kris Kobach’s dual voter registration system in Kansas is illegal and should be dumped, ACLU says

"An odd repercussion has arisen over Kansas’ proof-of-citizenship requirement for residents who register to vote.

So odd that the American Civil Liberties Union of Kansas has asked a state court to put an end to the two-tiered voter registration system that Secretary of State Kris Kobach has created, a system that critics call the law’s 'unintended consequence' or, less kindly, 'collateral damage.'



Subscribe to RSS - in the news
Why KU
  • One-third of full-time faculty have written casebooks used at U.S. law schools
  • 2 KU law faculty were U.S. Supreme Court clerks
  • KU’s Project for Innocence: 33 conviction reversals since 2009
  • 7,300+ alumni live in all 50 states and 18 foreign countries
  • #18 “best value” law school in the nation — National Jurist Magazine
  • 12 interdisciplinary joint degrees
  • 27th nationwide for lowest debt at graduation. — U.S. News & World Report
  • 70 percent of upper-level law classes have 25 or fewer students
  • Nearly 800 employment interviews at law school, 2012-13
  • Top 25% for number of 2013 grads hired by the nation’s largest law firms
  • 20th: for number of law alumni promoted to partner at the 250 largest law firms