Override of Veto on 9-11 Suits is a Significant Change, Says KU Professor

"Congress voted to override a veto by President Barack Obama for the first time on Wednesday. The legislation would allow families with members killed on 9-11 to sue Saudi Arabia for its role in the attacks.

'It’s quite dramatic just in that sense alone, not to mention the nature of the legislation and the position of Saudi Arabia,' said University of Kansas associate dean for international and comparative law Raj Bhala."

Claims of Saudi Role in 9/11 Appear Headed for Manhattan Court

"With families of Sept. 11 victims now able to pursue legal claims against the Saudis, the fight over responsibility for the terrorist attacks 15 years ago is likely to shift to a courtroom in Lower Manhattan, not far from where the World Trade Center once stood.

...

'Although there is loose talk of 10 billion dollars’ worth of judgments against Saudi Arabia, in fact the deck remains stacked against the plaintiffs,' said Raj Bhala, a professor of international and comparative law at the University of Kansas Law School."

Clinton vs. Trump: What's at Stake Tonight for NBC, Fox, ABC, CBS and the Debates Themselves

"[Over] the last eight years trust in the media had maintained a relatively steady level, around 40%-to-45% -- so a drop to 32% this year is significant," Mele wrote in an email. "I think not just NBC but the media as a whole needs to consider their role in this election cycle with the cold, clear eye normally reserved for outsiders.

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Panelists at discussion on sexual violence condemn harmful media messages on rape

"Harmful media messages on rape abound, University of Kansas law professor Corey Rayburn Yung told an audience of about 30 people Wednesday at the Watkins Museum of History, going so far as to say that classic cartoon character Pepé Le Pew is a rapist who perpetuates a harmful view of male sexual aggression.

Yung was part of a panel discussion on sexual violence that explored such topics as how the media reports on sexual violence, what friends and family can do for victims and a few local solutions."

As court prepares to hear school funding case, voters may hold most of the cards

"The long-running school finance lawsuit Gannon v. Kansas will return to the state Supreme Court on Wednesday, marking the fourth time the justices have been asked to resolve the matter.

This time, though, the oral arguments before the court will coincide with a hotly contested political campaign in which the issue of school funding is driving many races for state legislative seats.

The arguments also come at a time when five of the seven Supreme Court justices are on the election ballot themselves.

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Kobach defends voting laws during Dole Institute forum

"After months of defending controversial voting laws in federal and state court, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach debated the laws during a forum at the Dole Institute of Politics Tuesday night.

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'The legislature makes popular decisions and that's why we have a judiciary that has to make the unpopular decision,' said Mark Johnson, adjunct professor of law at the University of Kansas.

Johnson also pointed out that current voting laws may prove to have an adverse effect on minority voting.

Kobach, Johnson exchange blows in voter law debate

"Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach staked a claim Tuesday night as a national leader in voter security by championing adoption of laws requiring proof of citizenship to register, photograph identification to cast a ballot and mail-in ballot restrictions.

Lawyer Mark Johnson, sitting to Kobach’s right at the Dole Institute of Politics, said the Republican secretary of state was a central advocate for reform of voting law, undoubtedly popular, that ought to be declared unconstitutional for serving as a deterrent to participation in elections."

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