Grand jury to investigate online voter registration

After Devon Weisenbach's wife's voter registration was not processed, he submitted a petition asking the Douglas County Court to appoint a grand jury to investigate the matter.

"'It's not a trial as we think of a normal trial. What a grand jury does is conduct an investigation to determine if there's enough evidence that some crime occurred,' said Mark Johnson, law lecturer at the University of Kansas.

Child Porn Gets Longer Sentences than Rape, Molestation

"Defendants who commit sexual contact crimes, such as rape or molestation against children, often receive lighter sentences than those charged with possessing child pornography, academics agreed. That discrepancy can be attributed to money and quality of evidence, they said.


Federal crimes for child pornography are relatively new, said Corey Rayburn Yung, a professor at University of Kansas School of Law. 


Kansas Court Upholds Death Sentence in Sheriff Shooting

"The Kansas Supreme Court has affirmed the death penalty conviction of Scott Cheever.

The case has been enmeshed in multiple legal battles over the state’s death penalty law. This is just the second such conviction to be affirmed since 1994, when the state’s death penalty statute was enacted.

'The Kansas Supreme Court has not upheld that many death penalty cases,' said University of Kansas Law Professor Lumen 'Lou' Mulligan."

Should Iowa Ditch Judicial Retention Elections?

"Judges and justices often make unpopular decisions, and these decisions may come back to haunt them come election season.

For Supreme Court justices in Iowa, that’s every eight years. And this November, Chief Justice Mark Cady, along with Justices Daryl Hecht and Brent Appel will be on the ballot.

Voters will not be asked to choose between the current justices and a challenger; rather with a retention election, voters are simply asked if each justice should keep his or her job.

But, many dislike Iowa’s judicial retention system.


State officials adopt rule allowing thousands to vote in federal races without proving citizenship

"A small band of Kansas officials hastily enacted a rule Tuesday to allow more than 17,000 people who haven’t provided proof of citizenship to vote in federal races.

The regulation affects individuals who registered to vote at Department of Motor Vehicle offices and comes in response to a federal court order. The rule was adopted at the last minute — the day before advance voting for the August primary is set to begin.


Obama court nominee might be best Republicans can get, Kansas solicitor general says

"President Obama’s nominee for the open seat on the Supreme Court might be the best conservatives can get and could be confirmed by reluctant Republicans if Hillary Clinton wins the White House, Kansas Solicitor General Stephen McAllister said Friday.


'He is well-respected and probably as moderate a nominee as the Republicans could hope for,' McAllister said. 'The Republicans, if she wins, and Garland hasn’t been withdrawn, might want to approve him right after Election Day because he’s probably better than anybody they’re going to get from Mrs. Clinton.'"

What Next? Bhala explores Brexit and its impact across the globe

A look at Brexit and its impact across the globe, including here in KC. What's the professional and personal impact on people in the Midwest, and how will it affect our future?

Raj Bhala, Associate Dean for International and Comparative Law, Rice Distinguished Professor, KU School of Law
Bart Dean, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology at KU

Texas abortion decision could have Kansas implications

"News of the Supreme Court striking down Texas' strict regulations of abortion clinics may have a trickledown effect in Kansas. Texas rules require abortion providers to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals and forced clinics to meet hospital-like standards for outpatient care.

The nation's highest court held Monday that those regulations are medically unnecessary and unconstitutionally limit a woman's right to an abortion. Some law experts say that regulations in Kansas are quite similar.

KU Law Professor Explains SCOTUS Ruling on Texas Abortion Statute

"The United States Supreme Court in a 5-3 decision handed down Monday struck down a Texas law that would have severely limited the number of abortion clinics in the state. A law professor from the University of Kansas, Lumen “Lou” Mulligan explains the provisions of the law that were in question.


Mulligan explained the point of Constitutional law that the court was addressing.


Subscribe to RSS - in the news
Why KU
  • One-third of full-time faculty have written casebooks and treatises
  • 2 KU law faculty were U.S. Supreme Court clerks
  • KU’s Project for Innocence: 34 conviction reversals since 2009
  • 7,600+ alumni in all 50 states, D.C., and 21 foreign countries
  • #18 “best value” law school in the nation — National Jurist Magazine
  • 12 interdisciplinary joint degrees
  • 20th nationwide for lowest debt at graduation. — U.S. News & World Report
  • 80 percent of upper-level law classes have 25 or fewer students
  • More than 600 employment interviews at law school, 2014-15
  • 92 percent overall employment rate for Class of 2014 – top 20 percent nationally
  • 23rd: for number of law alumni promoted to partner at nation’s largest law firms
  • #1 in Kansas and Missouri for July 2015 bar exam performance