Posner says friction on 7th Circuit bench led to his retirement

"Richard A. Posner says clashes with his fellow judges over the way the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals treats litigants who represent themselves led him to retire from the bench earlier than he planned.

...

Posner told National Public Radio in 2012 he had become less conservative 'since the Republican Party started becoming goofy.'

And in a 2014 interview with the Daily Law Bulletin, Posner cited a 2010 study conducted by Corey Rayburn Yung as evidence that he was a moderate.

An American Perspective on NAFTA’s Past, Present, and Future

During this webinar, Raj discusses the following areas:

Origins and Visions for NAFTA — the 1989 Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement, Mexican instability, and North American integration.

Effects of NAFTA – production and consumption gains, impact on trade balances and employment, and income inequality.

Renegotiating NAFTA – sensitive agricultural and industrial sectors, expanding NAFTA beyond goods trade to services, IP, government procurement, and dispute settlement procedures.

President Trump uses ‘explicit power’ in pardon of Arpaio, KU professor says

"A University of Kansas professor said it’s well within the President’s powers to pardon former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, as he did last week.

'The President is given an explicit power in the Constitution to issue pardons,' said Richard Levy, the J.B. Smith Distinguished Professor of Constitutional Law at the University of Kansas. 'The Constitution doesn’t indicate any limits or substantive requirements or procedures. There aren’t any legal avenues to challenge the validity of a pardon.'”

Trump's Promise to Leave NAFTA Looks Like Another Empty Threat

"The president reaffirmed one of his most controversial campaign promises when he said, again, that he wanted to kill the North American Free Trade Agreement. 

...

Ending NAFTA, in fact, could ultimately do more harm to the US than to its neighbors, said Raj Bhala, a Rice distinguished professor at the University of Kansas and senior adviser for the law firm Dentons US LLP.

Man imprisoned for 17 years now freed after lookalike mix-up: 'I made it through'

"A man who spent 17 years behind bars for a crime he has always said he didn't commit is now free after a case of mistaken identity.

The conviction of Richard Jones, 41, has been overturned after the Midwest Innocence Project and the University of Kansas School of Law helped uncover what is now believed to be a wrongful conviction due to eyewitness misidentification."

Innocent Man Serves 17 Years for Robbery In Case of Mistaken Identity

"A Missouri man is free after serving 17 years in prison in what officials think was a case of mistaken identity.

Richard Jones, 41, was exonerated and released on June 8 after serving a majority of his 19-year sentence for aggravated robbery in Kansas City. Jones learned that a man who may have been the true culprit was in the same prison — and realized the man looks just like him, ABC News reports.

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