UO Today with Maxine Burkett and Elizabeth Kronk Warner

Maxine Burkett, Law, University of Hawai'i, and Elizabeth Kronk Warner, Law, University of Kansas, talk about how climate change impacts indigenous communities on Pacific Islands and in the Arctic. They discuss the role law can play in planning for adaptation to loss of resources and land. Burkett and Warner were keynote speakers at the UO's Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples Symposium, addressing tribal sovereignty, traditional knowledges, and climate-induced change among indigenous peoples in the U.S.

Exploring How Cities Can Switch To A Low-Carbon Energy Grid

"A law professor from the University of Kansas has explored innovative approaches for cities to switch to a low-carbon energy grid.

Uma Outka, an associate professor of law at the University of Kansas, is the author behind Cities and the Low-Carbon Grid, an upcoming article in the journal Environmental Law. The paper details innovative approaches cities and communities can use to cut carbon emissions, and how these efforts will affect energy governance in years to come.

KU law students bring home championship in Moot Court competition

The University is used to acknowledging all sorts of championships in various sports, but another University team just brought home a championship in something a little less known.

Law students Ashley Akers, from Casper, Wyo., and Maureen Orth, from Prairie Villiage, earned first place last weekend at this year’s National Native American Law Students Association Moot Court Competition, which took place at Michigan State University.

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Week puts focus on openness

"Sunshine Week, March 13 to 19, is a time to celebrate the Kansas Sunshine Laws. Under these laws, state and local governments generally must open their meetings and records to the public. Under the Sunshine Laws, Kansans have a right to know how officials are exercising their power and find out what the government is up to.

However, the Sunshine Week celebration this year coincides with rising concern about whether government in Kansas is sufficiently transparent. Open-government advocates are calling upon the Legislature to enact improvements in the Sunshine Laws."

Kansas Supreme Court decision could affect drunk driving cases

"The Kansas Supreme Court ruled last week that criminal punishment for refusing a sobriety test violates both the fourth and the fourteenth amendments of the United States Constitution.

'The Kansas Supreme Court took the position that a warrant is necessary if you're going to impose a criminal sanction for objecting to law enforcement when it seeks to take a blood test or a breath test,' said Mike Kautsch, law professor at the University of Kansas."

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