Nursing homes' use of binding arbitration comes under fire

"Though some patients, their families, attorneys and patient advocacy groups have been battling binding arbitration agreements in nursing homes for years, the vast majority of nursing homes now use them, said Greg Crist, a spokesman for the American Health Care Association, an industry group. Industry groups and their lawyers argue the agreements are a useful tool for saving patients and facilities time and money—cash that is better spent on patient care.

KU Today: Biology and law collide in award winner’s work

"Kansas University Earl B. Shurtz Research Professor Andrew Torrance has degrees in biology, genetics and law. He has taught at Harvard and MIT, and even advised President Barack Obama during his candidacy. He is truly a modern-day renaissance man.

'I really like dealing with cutting-edge science and the legal issues it raises,' Torrance said.

This spring, Torrance was recognized by Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little for his talents, as one of four professors to receive the University Scholarly Achievement Award last year.

Free Trade Deals Could Marginalize WTO as Negotiating Forum

"Free trade agreements like the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) could further undermine the World Trade Organization’s function as a negotiating forum, former delegate to the UN Convention on International Trade Law Raj Bhala told Sputnik.

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The World Trade Organization, Bhala asserted, will remain a key mechanism for trade policy review and dispute settlement, but its third primary function as a negotiating forum for broad deals that include all countries is at risk.

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KU professor at sexual assault symposium: ‘The hurdles of Title IX litigation are ridiculously high’

"Instead of investigating sexual assaults as Title IX transgressions, maybe universities should adjudicate them under a simpler safety code like other actions that pose a danger to campus?

Universities have effectively disciplined students for problems from cheating to drug possession under the student code of conduct model for years, said Kansas University law professor Corey Rayburn Yung, speaking Friday at the Kansas Law Review Symposium.

'There’s no real reason we have to abandon this framework in place of a far more difficult claim,' Yung said.

Former AG Phill Kline's law license a matter of constitutional debate

"The Kansas Supreme Court must consist of seven justices, the state’s constitution says, and 'not fewer than four justices shall be necessary for a decision.'

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"In May 2012, as Kline faced a hearing before the high court that would determine whether he could practice law in Kansas, his attorneys requested two Kansas Supreme Court justices — Carol Beier and Lawton Nuss — recuse themselves from his case because of their previous rulings against Kline. The attorneys also suggested that three other justices consider recusing themselves.

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Attorneys claim new DNA testing uncovers truth behind 1999 Oskaloosa murder

"For nearly a decade, lawyers with the Project for Innocence and Post-Conviction Remedies have combed trial testimony and evidence in search of something that will free Floyd Scott Bledsoe, 38, from the prison cell he occupies at Lansing Correctional Facility.

Last month, they may have found it.

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'We often say we believe our client is innocent,' said Elizabeth Cateforis, supervising attorney for the Project for Innocence. 'Floyd is innocent. There’s no belief about it.'

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