Law school honors top graduates for scholarship, leadership, service

Thursday, May 23, 2013

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas School of Law honored more than 170 graduates at a hooding ceremony Saturday, May 18. During the ceremony, eight students received awards for distinguishing themselves in scholarship, leadership and service to the law school and the community.

The recipients:

  • Michael Andrusak, Salina, Class of 1949 Leadership Award
  • Ebonie Davis, Kansas City, Kan., Janean Meigs Memorial Award
  • Ashley Dillon, Orinda, Calif., Faculty Award for Outstanding Scholastic Achievement
  • Joy Isaacs, Topeka, Walter Hiersteiner Outstanding Service Award
  • Eric Sader, Salina, Robert F. Bennett Award
  • Joe Schremmer, Derby, Samuel Mellinger Scholarship, Leadership and Service Award
  • Isabel Segarra, Austin, Texas, Justice Lloyd Kagey Leadership Award
  • Henry Thomas, Overland Park, Class of 1949 Leadership Award

The award winners were part of a class composed of 174 recipients of the Juris Doctor, seven Doctor of Juridical Science graduates and two Master of Laws in Elder Law graduates.

Also honored during the ceremony was Uma Outka, associate professor of law, who received the 2013 Moreau Award. The award is given annually to the faculty member who, in the eyes of law students, has been particularly helpful in advising.

Funds for the awards are managed by KU Endowment, the independent, nonprofit organization serving as the official fundraising and fund-management organization for KU. Founded in 1891, KU Endowment was the first foundation of its kind at a U.S. public university.

Student award recipients are listed below by hometown.

JOHNSON COUNTY
From Overland Park

Henry ThomasHenry Thomas was one of two recipients of the Class of 1949 Leadership Award, given to the student who has contributed most significantly to the overall experience of students in Green Hall. Thomas raised hundreds of dollars and gathered hundreds of books for children at surrounding hospitals and collaborated to create a successful Diversity Banquet during his term as president of the Asian Law Students Association. He spent a year serving indigent clients in Douglas County as a participant in the Legal Aid Clinic and three years as a Student Ambassador, advising and educating prospective law students. During the 2012-13 academic year, Thomas served as editor-in-chief of the Kansas Journal of Law and Public Policy. Thomas is the son of Zach and Mary Thomas and a graduate of Rockhurst High School and Marquette University.

SALINE COUNTY
From Salina
Michael AndrusakMichael Andrusak was one of two recipients of the Class of 1949 Leadership Award, given to the student who has contributed most significantly to the overall experience of students in Green Hall. Andrusak served two years as president of the Student Bar Association, reorganizing its structure to encourage continuity of its leadership. He spearheaded fundraising events and spoke at new student orientation, welcoming students and acclimating them to law school. He attended Board of Governors and other similar meetings, ensuring that students enjoyed a voice in law school governance.  And, of course, he organized events, such as football tailgates, that allowed students to socialize and build relationships to last well beyond law school. Andrusak is the son of Janet Andrusak, was home-schooled through high school, and graduated from Pepperdine University.

Eric SaderEric Sader received the Robert F. Bennett Award, recognizing a graduate whose undergraduate degree is from a Kansas university or college and who has demonstrated leadership qualities through public service. Sader graduated with a joint degree in law and social work. For two years, he served as a resident assistant in the law school’s Journey to J.D. program.  He is a student representative on the board of directors for Ecumenical Campus Ministries at KU and, in 2011, was named one of KU’s Men of Merit in recognition of his role modeling a positive definition of masculinity through action and leadership. Sader has served as chief justice of the university’s Student Court of Appeals and an audio-reader for the visually impaired. He was recently selected as the new executive director of Jana’s Campaign, an organization dedicated to reducing gender and relationship violence. Sader is the son of Dale Sader and Mary Cook and a graduate of Salina High School South and McPherson College.

SEDGWICK COUNTY
From Derby
Joe SchremmerJoe Schremmer received the Samuel Mellinger Scholarship, Leadership and Service Award, given to the graduate who has most distinguished himself or herself in the combined areas of scholarship, leadership and service. Schremmer graduated with a joint degree in law and business, and his grades were among the best in his law school class. He served two years as a Lawyering Skills teaching assistant and two years in the Volunteer Tax Assistance Program, providing tax preparation assistance for low-income Kansans. His scholarly note, “Avoidable Fraccident: An Argument Against Strict Liability for Hydraulic Fracturing,” was selected for publication in the Kansas Law Review before he became the publication’s editor-in-chief. Schremmer is the son of Richard and Janice Schremmer and a graduate of Derby High School and KU. 

SHAWNEE COUNTY
From Topeka
Joy IsaacsJoy Isaacs received the Walter Hiersteiner Outstanding Service Award, given to the graduate whose service to his or her fellow students demonstrates the greatest promise for contribution to the legal profession and society. As a Shook, Hardy & Bacon Scholar, Isaacs mentored members of the first-year class to help improve their academic performance. She founded the law school’s 3-to-1 mentorship program, which matches successful upper-level students with entering first-year students. Isaacs served on the Kansas Law Review and still found time to coach volleyball at The Barstow Middle School. Isaacs is the daughter of Stan Noakes and Linda Noakes and a graduate of Washburn Rural High School and KU. 

WYANDOTTE COUNTY
From Kansas City, Kan.
Ebonie DavisEbonie Davis received the Janean Meigs Memorial Award, given to the student who has demonstrated a caring spirit in service to the students of the law school or the community at large. Davis served two years as a teaching assistant in the Journey to J.D. program designed to mentor and encourage diverse young people to consider law school and pursue legal opportunities in the region. She also served as president of the Black Law Students Association. In that role, she spearheaded BLSA’s annual Thanksgiving food drive and organized Thurgood Marshall Law Day, which annually hosts dozens of local high school students. She also serves as a mentor for the MODELS Mentoring Program, a community organization for teenage girls ages 12-17. And she has made these contributions to school and community while also caring for her own family, which includes two sons, ages 3 and 6. Davis is the daughter of Barbara White and a graduate of Wyandotte High School and the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

CALIFORNIA
From Orinda
Ashley DillonAshley Dillon received the Faculty Award for Outstanding Scholastic Achievement, which goes to the graduating student selected by the faculty as having made the most significant contribution toward overall legal scholarship. Dillon’s scholarly note about the Kansas Uniform Trade Secrets Act was published in Volume 60 of the Kansas Law Review. She also served as executive note and comment editor on the Law Review and a chief justice of the Moot Court Council. Dillon spent two years as a Lawyering Skills teaching assistant, mentoring lawyering students in the first-year. She has accomplished all of this while maintaining an outstanding grade point average throughout all three years of her studies. Dillon is the daughter of Kent and Lynn Dillon and a graduate of Miramonte High School and the University of Missouri.

TEXAS
From Austin
Isabel SegarraIsabel Segarra received the Justice Lloyd Kagey Leadership Award, given to the graduate who has most distinguished him or herself through leadership in the law school. A passionate environmental advocate, Segarra reinvigorated KU’s Environmental Law Society, serving as president during the 2011-12 academic year.  As president, she brought various environmental law attorneys, including representatives from the Environmental Protection Agency, to Green Hall for career panels and other educational functions; she lobbied the administration to stop purchasing Styrofoam products; and she encouraged faculty, staff and student participation in the Lights Out Energy Competition among different units on campus. This year, Segarra moderated a panel discussion on the impact of climate change on indigenous peoples during KU’s annual Tribal Law and Government Conference. She has written for the Journal of the Kansas Bar Association and was a member of the Jessup International Moot Court team that qualified for the international finals. Segarra is the daughter of Dolores Treviño and a graduate of Liberal Arts and Science Academy and Texas A&M University.

Professor Martin Dickinson honored with Steeples award

Thursday, May 16, 2013

LAWRENCE – Through teaching, research, advising and mentoring, the faculty members of the University of Kansas serve a large audience through their work. Some go even further in their service to the state of Kansas. Three such faculty members have been honored for their exemplary contributions to the people of Kansas with the Steeples Service to Kansans Award.

The recipients of the 2013 Steeples award are Martin Dickinson, School of Law; John Hachmeister, visual art, and Kelly Kindscher, environmental studies.

Don Steeples, the Dean A. McGee Distinguished Professor of Applied Geophysics, and his wife, Tammy, established the award in 1997 to honor Don Steeples’ parents, Wally and Marie Steeples, and to recognize outstanding service by KU faculty to other Kansans. The award provides recipients with $1,000 and an additional $1,000 base adjustment to their salaries.

Martin Dickinson is the Robert A. Schroeder Distinguished Professor of Law. He was nominated primarily for his work relating to tax law and estate planning. Over four decades he has served on numerous state-level advisory committees relating to property taxes, income tax, estate tax and trust administration. These committees have suggested important revisions to Kansas law that have protected the elderly and helped ensure a fair system of revenue generation for the state. While serving as dean of the KU law school from 1971 to 1980, Dickinson created new admission criteria, recruited outstanding faculty and convinced legislators to fund a new building, all of which strengthened the school’s profile regionally and nationally.

John Hachmeister is an associate professor of sculpture in the School of the Arts. The Steeples Award recognizes his promotion of “the arts in the community” in and around Kansas. Perhaps the best example of this is his 25-year commitment to preserve and maintain the Garden of Eden folk art site in Lucas. Lucas has since been designated as the “Grassroots Arts Capitol of Kansas.” Hachmeister was also instrumental in developing a partnership between KU and the Kansas City School for the Blind. The program, Accessible Arts, connects KU art students with children at the Kansas City School for the Blind to create tactile objects used as learning aids for many subjects including math and science. Most recently, Hachmeister connected four area artists with a trustee to create four larger-than-life statues in Independence depicting works of Kansas-born playwright William Inge.

Kelly Kindscher, courtesy professor of environmental studies and ecology and evolutionary biology, has served the state of Kansas for more than 20 years as a voice for the environment of Kansas, especially its plants and prairies. Kindscher, who is also a senior scientist at the Kansas Biological Survey, has always focused on public education and engagement in his work, whether speaking to city and community groups, leading walks introducing Kansans to native plants and prairies or providing environmental advice across the state. Kindscher's research interests are focused on prairie and montane meadow plant communities, wetland and prairie restoration, conservation of Midwest/Great Plains ecosystems and ethnobotany.

Funds for the Steeples award are managed by KU Endowment, the independent, nonprofit organization serving as the official fundraising and fund-management organization for KU. Founded in 1891, KU Endowment was the first foundation of its kind at a U.S. public university.

Law professor's book explores 'constitution of international trade law'

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

LAWRENCE — For nearly 60 years, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, better known as GATT, brought down barriers, encouraged trade among nations and changed the way the world does business, yet received surprisingly little attention in the world of scholarly law. A University of Kansas law professor has changed that with a two-volume, 3,000-page exploration of the “constitution of international trade law.”

Raj Bhala, associate dean for international and comparative law and Rice Distinguished Professor at the KU School of Law, has authored “Modern GATT Law: A Treatise on the Law and Political Economy of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade and Other World Trade Organization Agreements” second edition. The book is an extensive examination of GATT, all 38 of its articles, their applications in the law, related WTO influence, examinations of theories critical of unlimited international trade and much more.

“It came about as a passion for the topic,” Bhala said of the treatise. “I’ve always been fascinated by GATT. Unintentionally, it became the constitution of international trade law. It was a shining example of the reality and effectiveness of international law. It was functioning effectively, and yet no one was paying attention to it. Even after the birth of the WTO in 1995, GATT remains, and its rules and principles get reincarnated in new areas, such as services and intellectual property.”

Bhala wrote the first edition in 2005. Since then, international trade law has both flourished and changed dramatically with the influence of the WTO and its roughly 160 member countries. More than 400 cases have been adjudicated at the WTO, dealing with all manner of trade law topics, including ones directly relevant to Kansas, like subsidies for agricultural products and airplanes. That prompted the second edition, published like the first, by Sweet & Maxwell.

Drafted beginning in 1945 and enacted in 1948, GATT was hugely influential in bringing nations together through international trade. GATT grew in members from 23 in 1947 to more than 125 by 1995, including poor, newly independent, Muslim and nonwestern nations. “Modern GATT Law” explores how the membership grew more diverse, including the importance of developing nations and how nations such as China, Saudi Arabia, Russia, Laos and Tajikistan gained positions of varying degrees of power within the organization.

Among its 85 chapters “Modern GATT Law” not only examines all articles of GATT and related WTO provisions, but it offers applicable case studies and examines all WTO rounds, including the failed Doha round, which declared fighting terrorism and extremism through trade as its top priority. Bhala examines how trade has become a tool in international diplomacy and element of national security, as illustrated in part by sanctions placed on Iran and North Korea. He also examines controversial topics such as mad cow disease and its effects on trade between nations and how GATT increasingly links law and other areas of scholarship.

“The treatise this time really goes over the essential precepts, essential interdisciplinary foundations of politics, religion, economics and philosophy as they relate to law,” Bhala said. “International traders and their lawyers have become much more conscious of those links over the years and are not as likely to look at trade law as an isolated topic.”

International trade and global commerce have come under increasing criticism in recent years, often justifiably so, Bhala said, when the drive for profit results in human rights abuses, environmental degradation, labor violations, poverty and other outcomes contrary to human dignity and the common good. The treatise analyzes such criticisms and evaluates emerging theories of how international trade law can be reformed to comport better with social justice, offering neither justification nor condemnation of any one theory, but lending insight into how each one fits into modern international trade law.

Early demand for the book has been strong in several countries.

“It’s rare for a book to appeal to the international markets in the way that ‘Modern GATT Law’ does. It’s a testament to the quality of the text that our subsidiaries in America, Canada, Hong Kong, Australia and New Zealand have all expressed their interest in disseminating the title within their jurisdictions,” said Andrew Moroney, publishing editor at Sweet & Maxwell in London. “In fact, each presentation about the book to those companies has met with unanimous praise for the scope and breadth of the contents list alone, so we expect to hear great things when the books land on their desks.”

In addition to being a useful reference for international trade lawyers, scholars and anyone interested in cross-border commerce, Bhala said the book is both an homage to the visionary work of the founders of GATT and an invaluable teaching tool. Students at the KU School of Law were intimately involved in all aspects of the book’s creation. In particular, the student research assistants, who hail from across Kansas and from multiple nations, gained an experience not available in the traditional classroom.

“I give a great deal of credit to the research assistants,” Bhala said. “A two-year project like this simply could not have been done on time, or with quality, without my research assistants at the KU Law School. They were enthusiastically engaged through legal research and writing on sophisticated topics. I learned a great deal from their productive output, and they are testaments to the synergy between teaching and research. Plus, we had a lot of fun.”

KU law school bestows Distinguished Alumni Award on three public servants

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

LAWRENCE — A Kansas Supreme Court justice, a former state legislator and a former chairman of the Kansas Board of Regents have received the highest honor given by the University of Kansas School of Law.

From left are Justice Carol Beier, Timothy Emert and John Vratil.Justice Carol Beier, Class of 1985, Timothy Emert, Class of 1965, and John Vratil, Class of 1971, received the Distinguished Alumni Award during a ceremony Saturday, May 11, in Lawrence. The award is presented annually to graduates who have distinguished themselves through exemplary service to the legal profession, their communities, KU and the state or nation.

“Justice Beier is an active and loyal alumna who has worked to improve the law school experience for all its students,” said Stephen Mazza, dean of the law school. “She has had incredible success in the legal profession, and she used her success to benefit her community, her state and her alma mater.”

“Regent Emert is the consummate public servant. He has spent a good portion of his legal career pursuing policies that have benefited the people of Kansas. And John Vratil’s devotion to improving the educational system for all Kansans is worthy of merit. The law school is honored to have him as a graduate.”   

Also recognized at the ceremony were new recipients of the James Woods Green Medallion, named in honor of the law school’s first dean. The school presents medallions to its major financial contributors. This year’s honorees were Jennifer Gille Bacon, Class of 1976; William (Brad) Bradley Jr., Class of 1980; Richard Sias, Class of 1954; Charles Hostetler, Class of 1963, and Julie Hostetler; Jeffrey S. Nelson, Class of 1980, and Lisa K. Nelson; Patrick Peery, Class of 1981; the law firm of Snell & Wilmer LLP; and John Stewart, Class of 1940, and Hannah Stewart.

More about the Distinguished Alumni Award winners:

Appointed to the Kansas Court of Appeals in 2000 and the Kansas Supreme Court in 2003, Justice Carol Beier is the first female graduate of the KU School of Law to serve on the high court. She has authored about 600 judicial opinions for the citizens of Kansas. A native of Kansas City, Kan., Beier graduated from KU with a bachelor’s in journalism in 1981 and a law degree in 1985. In 2004, she received her Master of Laws from the University of Virginia School of Law. She began her legal career as a law clerk to Judge James K. Logan of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit and then worked on family income security, education and employment issues at the National Women’s Law Center. Beier entered private practice at Arent, Fox, Kintner, Plotkin & Kahn and later became a partner at Foulston Siefkin LLP in Wichita. Beier’s community and professional service includes membership in the National Association of Women Judges, Kansas Bar Association and Kansas Women Attorneys Association. She was named to the KU Women's Hall of Fame in 2012.

Timothy Emert is the only Kansan to have served as chairman of the Kansas State Board of Education and the Kansas Board of Regents. He earned a bachelor’s in journalism in 1962 and a law degree in 1965 from KU and entered private practice as a sole practitioner in his hometown of Independence, Kan., where he has continued to live for 48 years. He was a member of the Independence Public Library board of directors, the local board of education and the Kansas State Board of Education. His public service continued in the Kansas Senate, where he represented the 15th District for eight years, spending four years as majority leader and six years as chairman of the Judiciary Committee. Emert has served as a member of the Kansas State High School Activities Association, Kansas Commission on Public Broadcasting and Kansas Children’s Campaign. After leaving the legislature, Emert served as chairman of the advisory board for the Juvenile Justice Authority and a member of the Kansas Governmental Ethics Commission. In 2010, he was appointed to the Kansas Board of Regents by Gov. Mark Parkinson.

John Vratil graduated from KU with a bachelor’s in education in 1967 and a law degree in 1971, having served as an editor of the Kansas Law Review. He received a scholarship through KU’s Direct Exchange Program and continued his studies abroad at the University of Exeter in England. Vratil was a partner with the law firm of Lathrop & Norquist (later Lathrop & Gage) from 1992 to 2011, where his litigation practice focused on matters involving school law and finance, property taxation, contracts, employment claims, secured transactions, real estate and zoning. He currently serves as general counsel for the Blue Valley Unified School District. A Republican representing the 11th District, Vratil was first elected in 1998 and served three terms in the Kansas Senate, including 11 years as Senate vice president. Vratil was president of the Kansas Bar Association in 1995-1996 and served on the Kansas Judicial Council from 2001-2009. In 2012, he received the Friend of Education Award from the Blue Valley School District and the Leawood Chamber of Commerce Hall of Fame Award.

View previous Distinguished Alumni Award recipients on the law school’s website.

LaVerta Logan receives employee of the year award

Thursday, May 09, 2013

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas awarded employees of all categories who have reached landmark years of service at the annual employee recognition ceremony on Thursday, May 2, in the Kansas Union Ballroom.

“Our dedicated employees have been part of incredible change over the past few years, and we’re grateful beyond words for their hard work. Our great university is the result of our great employees,” Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little said.

The chancellor acknowledged employees for their years of service and presented the awards to the Employees of the Year.

The Unclassified Staff Employee of the Year for 2013 is Daniel DePardo, engineering technician senior. DePardo began working in the Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science in 1993. DePardo will receive a $1,500 award and a reserved parking space for one year. 

LaVerta Logan, administrative associate senior, was honored as the 2013 University Support Staff Employee of the Year. Logan currently works for the Law School’s Career Services Office and has been working for KU since 1996.

Recognized with the 2013 Team Award was the team from The Library Preservation Emergency and Disaster Planning Committee. The nominated teams for recognition were as follows: Common Book Leadership Team, Edwards Campus Academic Program Planning Team, PeopleSoft Project CORE Functional and IT PeopleSoft Administrators Team, LGBT Discussion Panel, Edwards Campus Security Implementation Team and Libraries Preservation Department.

More information about employee recognition at KU is available here.

Article addresses constitutional issues with private government contractors

Wednesday, May 01, 2013

LAWRENCE — A University of Kansas law professor has co-authored an article about remedying constitutional violations perpetrated by privately employed government contractors on the heels of briefing the same issue in the U.S. Supreme Court.

In addition to this real-world engagement as a lawyer and as a scholar, Lumen N. Mulligan, professor of law and director of the Shook, Hardy and Bacon Center for Excellence in Advocacy, brings this high-level, hands-on experience to the KU Law School classroom.

Mulligan co-authored both an amicus curiae brief in the high court case of Minneci v. Pollard and an article, discussing the case, with Alexander A. Reinert, associate professor of law at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. The article will appear in the Washington University Law Review in May 2013.

In the case, an inmate at a privately run federal prison claimed that during work detail he fractured both of his elbows. He wasn’t given immediate medical care, was later shackled, exacerbating the injury before treatment, and was ultimately left unable to work upon his release. He sued for violations of his Eighth Amendment constitutional rights. The Supreme Court ruled that, even though publicly employed prison guards would be susceptible to suit, the privately employed guards could not be found liable for constitutional violations because of their employment status.

Taking a stance contrary to the Court’s ultimate holding during the high court briefing, Mulligan explained that “our position was that there should be no distinction, in terms of liability for constitutional violations, between government-run and privately run prisons. The decision as it stands allows federal agencies to avoid their constitutionally imposed liability simply by hiring private contractors.”

In the article, the professors argue that the decision was in error and discuss how its impact can be limited.

“The opinion, in our view, fatally ignores — indeed fails to even consider — the text of the Westfall Act of 1988, which specifically endorsed constitutional actions such as what was at issue in Minneci,” Mulligan said. “Also, it destroys the parallel set of doctrine for remedying violations of constitutional rights by state and federal officers and creates asymmetrical liability for private versus public employs, which in turn creates non-market-based incentives to privatize government functions.”

The decision was also troublesome because the use of state tort law, which the Supreme Court relied upon as an alternative to a constitutional action, cannot always be applied in the same manner as federal constitutional law, Mulligan and Reinert argue.

“Indeed, many of these assumed state law remedies are not available for plaintiffs,” Mulligan said. “The very same defendants from Minneci often argue that state law does not apply to them because they are immune under the so-called government contractor doctrine. These defendants should not be allowed to have their cake and eat it, too.”

In addition to this pro bono service to the bar, Mulligan said taking part in ongoing, high-level court action benefits KU Law students. By supplying arguments in the Supreme Court, working with practicing attorneys, judges and clients, Mulligan is better able to engage students with skills-based learning — not simply dated textbook material.

“I believe that keeping up with practice helps me connect with my students and deliver up-to-date approaches to the art of advocacy. Students want to know that their coursework will translate to practice directly,” Mulligan said. “As such, my continued work in that regard adds some authenticity to the classroom.”

Two KU law librarians earn tenure

Friday, April 19, 2013

LAWRENCE — Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little has approved promotion and the award of tenure where indicated for 65 individuals at the University of Kansas Lawrence and Edwards campuses and 56 individuals at the University of Kansas Medical Center.

“Congratulations to this year’s accomplished group of individuals,” said Gray-Little. “As a major research university it is important we create an environment where our faculty and researchers aspire to new heights and receive recognition for their ongoing achievements in their scholarly fields and teaching. I also offer my sincere gratitude to the University Committee on Promotion and Tenure for their thorough review of this year’s eligible individuals.”

Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Jeff Vitter chairs the University Committee on Promotion and Tenure. “This year the committee evaluated a particularly strong group of candidates,” said Vitter. “The committee was particularly impressed by the candidates' accomplishments and dedication across the broad spectrum of disciplines. They are representative of the comprehensive research and educational excellence of KU.”

Douglas Girod, M.D., executive vice chancellor at the University of Kansas Medical Center, said, “I echo the Chancellor's congratulations, and I'm proud of our recently promoted faculty and their achievements in teaching, research and service. It's an honor to work with such outstanding scholars and educators who have the utmost respect of their colleagues and students. This is also an opportunity to thank the Promotion and Tenure Committees of the Schools of Health Professions, Nursing and Medicine for their diligent efforts to complete the peer review process.”

University of Kansas Lawrence and Edwards campuses

To full professor:

  • Ruth Ann Atchley, psychology
  • Luis Corteguera, history
  • Cynthia Colwell Dunn, music
  • Stephen Egbert, geography /senior scientist, Kansas Biological Survey
  • Peter Herlihy, geography
  • John Hoopes, anthropology
  • Danny Marfatia, physics & astronomy
  • Adolfo Matamoros, civil, environmental & architectural engineering
  • Jeff Moran, history
  • Michael Murray, physics & astronomy
  • Susan Scholz, business
  • Milena Stanislavova, mathematics
  • John Staniunas, theatre
  • Jeff Staudinger, pharmacology and toxicology
  • Sherrie Tucker, American studies
  • Michael Vitevitch, psychology
  • Susan Williams, chemical & petroleum engineering

To associate professor with tenure:

  • Brian D. Ackley, molecular biosciences
  • James Basham, special education
  • Christina Bejarano, political science
  • Caroline Bennett, civil, environmental & architectural engineering
  • Benjamin Chappell, American studies
  • Jay Childers, communication studies
  • Michael M. Davidson, music
  • Christopher Depcik, mechanical engineering
  • Claudia L. Dozier, applied behavioral sciences
  • William Elliott III, social welfare
  • M. Laird Forrest, pharmaceutical chemistry
  • Jeff Hall, communication studies
  • Heidi L. Hallman, curriculum & teaching
  • David M. Hansen, psychology & research in education
  • Mark T. Holder, ecology & evolutionary biology
  • Timothy Jackson, chemistry
  • David Kevin Johnson, psychology/associate scientist, gerontology
  • Jay Truman Johnson, geography
  • Maki Kaneko, art history
  • ChangHwan Kim, sociology
  • Prasad Kulkarni, electrical engineering & computer science
  • Mark Landau, psychology
  • Tracey LaPierre, sociology
  • Young-Jin Lee, educational leadership & policy studies
  • Craig Marshall, geology
  • Craig McLaughlin, aerospace engineering
  • David B. Mechem, geography
  • Meagan Patterson, psychology & research in education
  • Paul Popiel, music
  • Gregory Rudnick, physics & astronomy
  • Argun Saatcioglu, educational leadership & policy studies
  • Philip Stinson, classics
  • Belinda Sturm, civil, environmental & architectural engineering
  • Nina Vyatkina, germanic language & literatures
  • Crispin Williams, east asian languages & cultures
  • Yan (Diana) Wu, business
  • Zheng (Jane) Zhao, business

Tenure only

  • Clinton D. Chadwick, business

To associate librarian

  • Amalia Monroe-Gullick, University Libraries
  • Christopher Steadham, Wheat Law Library
  • William Blake Wilson, Wheat Law Library

To librarian

  • Whitney Baker, University Libraries
  • Fran Devlin, University Libraries


Research and Graduate Studies

  • Janis Bulgren, Center for Research on Learning, to research professor
  • Gaisheng Liu, Kansas Geological Survey, to associate scientist
  • Kerry Newell, Kansas Geological Survey, to associate scientist
  • Patricia Noonan, Center for Research on Learning, to associate research professor
  • Xinkun Wang, Higuchi Bioscience Center, to associate research professor

 

University of Kansas Medical Center

To professor (previously tenured)

  • Diane Boyle, School of Nursing
  • Jeffrey Burns, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Neurology
  • Won Choi, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
  • Jeff Holzbeierlein, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Urology
  • Ajay Nangia, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Urology

Tenure awarded (at current rank of professor)

  • Tracie Collins, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health-Wichita

To professor on clinical scholar track (nontenure track)

  • Stewart Babbott, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine
  • Siddhartha Ganguly, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine

To professor (affiliate track, Stowers Institute), (volunteer, nontenure track)

  • Peter Baumann, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology
  •  Paul Trainor, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology

To clinical professor (clinical track, full-time, nontenure track)

  • Nelda Godfrey, School of Nursing

To clinical professor (clinical track, part-time, nontenure track)

  •  Gerard Brungardt, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Internal Medicine-Wichita

 To clinical professor (clinical track, volunteer, nontenure track)

  •  Milton Landers, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Anesthesiology-Wichita

Tenure awarded (at current rank of associate professor)

  • Kimberly Engelman, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
  • Tiffany Johnson, School of Health Professions Department of Hearing and Speech Education
  • Kim Kimminau, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Family Medicine
  • Jules Nazzaro, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Neurosurgery

To associate professor with tenure

  • Christie Befort Cardador, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
  • Ana Paula Cupertino, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
  • Wenxing Ding, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics
  • Patrick Fields, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Jianghua He, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Biostatistics
  • Lisa Mische Lawson, School of Health Professions Department of Occupational Therapy
  • Hiroshi Nishimune, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology
  • Hung-Wen Yeh, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Biostatistics

To associate professor on clinical scholar track (nontenure track)

  • Ahmad Abdulkarim, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Surgery
  • Daniel Aires, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine
  • Rajib Bhattacharya, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine
  • Inna D’Empaire, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Psychiatry-Wichita
  • Garth Fraga, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Michael Grasso, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Health Policy and Management
  • Stephen Lassen, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Pediatrics
  • Rashna Madan, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Aroop Pal, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine  
  • Valerie Schroeder, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Pediatrics
  • Jason Stubbs, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine
  • Karthik Vamanan, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Surgery
  • Connie Wang, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine

To associate professor (affiliate track, Stowers Institute), (volunteer, nontenure track)

  • Sue Jaspersen, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology
  • Kausik Si, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology

To associate professor (affiliate track, Mid-America Cardiologist), (volunteer, nontenure track)

  • Jayant Nath, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine
  • Rhea Pimentel, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine

To associate professor (VA affiliate), (volunteer, nontenure track)

  • Ajay Bansal, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine
  • Trenton Nauser, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine
  • Ozlem Ulusarac, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

To clinical associate professor (clinical track, full time, nontenure track)

  • Catherine Smith, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Pediatrics

To clinical associate professor (clinical track, volunteer, nontenure track)

  • Valerie Creswell, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Internal Medicine-Wichita
  • Ryan Ferrell, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Internal Medicine
  • Kenneth Jansson, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Surgery-Wichita
  • Jing W. Liu, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Internal Medicine-Wichita
  • Nazih Moufarrij, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Surgery-Wichita
  • Ruth Weber, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Family and Community Medicine-Wichita

To research associate professor (research track, full time, nontenure track)

  • Linda Heitzman-Powell, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Pediatrics
  • Owen Nadeau, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
  • Mohammad Rumi, School of Medicine-Kansas City Campus Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

To research associate professor (research track, volunteer, nontenure track)

  • Shang-You Yang, School of Medicine-Wichita Campus Department of Surgery-Wichita Campus.

 

Law school alumna inducted to KU Women's Hall of Fame

Monday, April 08, 2013

LAWRENCE – The Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity at the University of Kansas will host its annual Women’s Recognition Banquet at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 9, in the Kansas Union ballroom. The induction of six new members of the KU Women’s Hall of Fame will highlight a program honoring outstanding women across the university.

A total of 26 outstanding female students and three outstanding female faculty and staff will be honored with annual awards. These awards were established to honor KU female students, staff, faculty and alumnae who have enriched and improved the campus and community through their service, teaching or involvement.

In addition to the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity, the program is sponsored by the Commission on the Status of Women and the Office of Diversity and Equity.

Faculty and staff being honored include Outstanding Woman Educator Andrea Greenhoot, associate professor of psychology; Outstanding Woman Staff Member Sharon Leatherman, office manager for KU Memorial Unions; and Jennifer Roberts, associate professor of geology, who will receive the Kathleen McCluskey-Fawcett Woman Mentoring Women Award.

The 2012 Pioneer Woman award honors Stephanie Mott, who is executive director and founder of the Kansas Statewide Transgender Education Project (K-Step) and state vice-chair for Kansas Equality Coalition. K-Step works to eliminate discrimination against transgender people and their families through education. Working with the Kansas Equality Coalition, Mott helped bring about protections for LGBT students and staff in the Topeka School District and the addition of gender identity to Lawrence’s anti-discrimination policy. She serves on the board of the Topeka/Shawnee County Homeless Taskforce and Metropolitan Community Church of Topeka and volunteers with the Safe Streets Coalition, YWCA Center for Safety and Empowerment, Topeka AIDS Project and the Shawnee County Jail. 

KU has inducted outstanding leaders into its Women’s Hall of Fame since 1970. The Women’s Hall of Fame site is on the fifth floor of the Kansas Union. The 2013 KU Women’s Hall of Fame inductees are:

Janet Sommer Campbell, general manager, Kansas Public Radio and director, Kansas Audio-Reader: Campbell graduated from KU in 1979 with a bachelor's degree in education with an emphasis on special education. That same year, she began her career at Kansas Audio-Reader as a secretary. Nine years later, she became director. Under her guidance, Audio-Reader grew to be the second-largest service of its kind in the country and was one of the first to pioneer the use of cable television and the internet for program distribution. Campbell became the interim director of KPR in 1997 and two years later was named general manager. KPR is an award-winning service of KU that provides continuous broadcasts of news and cultural programs to more than 100,000 listeners. She has been a member of the Kansas Association of Broadcasters Board of Directors since 2009, was appointed to the Governor’s Cultural Affairs Council in 2005 and is an active in her church.

Cathy Daicoff, MPA, managing director, U.S. public finance criteria officer, Standard & Poor’s Rating Services Daicoff graduated from KU in 1977 with a degree in political science, then earned a Master’s in Public Administration and Finance from Syracuse University.  In 1978 she began her career at Standard & Poor’s Rating Services in the public finance department. Today she is the managing director of U.S. Public Finance and Chair of the Public Finance Criteria Committee. During her 35-year career at Standard & Poor’s, Daicoff has established a Canadian branch of Standards & Poor’s, navigated the company’s Latin American firm through a massive economic crisis and been named the senior policy officer and director of global policy training.  She has served as a KU Endowment trustee, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Board member and was a co-chair of the Women Philanthropists for KU.

Kathleen Davis, assistant professor, KU Medical Center, and director, KU Kids Healing Place: Davis earned her B.S.E in 1974, M.S.Ed. in 1997 and doctorate in 2007 from KU. Davis began her career as a special education teacher working with orthopedically handicapped children. Today she is a leading expert in pediatric palliative care and director of KU Kids Healing Place at KUMC. Davis’ role in founding and directing KU Kids Healing Place has made it one of the nation’s leading programs for pediatric palliative care.  Davis and the KU Kids Healing Place utilize a holistic approach to pediatric palliative care that is rarely found in other programs. Her program includes children with chronic illnesses, terminally ill children and provides support for families. Her methods are nationally respected, and she is often invited to speak at conferences and other educational gatherings in order to share her unique vision on pediatric palliative care.

Sara Thomas Rosen, senior vice provost for academic affairs, KU: Rosen received her doctorate in linguistics and cognitive sciences in 1989 from Brandies University. Shortly thereafter she began her career at KU. In 1991, she became an assistant professor and in 2006 was named professor of linguistics. Prior to her appointment in the Provost’s Office, Rosen served as chair of the linguistics department and dean of graduate studies.  As senior vice provost for academic affairs, Rosen has primary responsibility for academic programs as well as overseeing the quality of graduate and undergraduate programs. Rosen has been recognized as an influential adviser and educator by receiving awards such as J. Michael Young Academic Advising Award and the Excellence in Teaching Award from KU. Rosen continues to teach in the linguistics department and conduct research in theoretical syntax.

Donna E. Sweet, M.D., AAHIVS, MACP, professor of internal medicine, KU School of Medicine-Wichita: Sweet earned her M.D. in 1979 from KU Medical Center.  She has been an advocate, educator and caregiver to individuals with HIV for many years. She established the Sweet Emergency Fund, which provides financial assistance to individuals with HIV who need help with medications and with their everyday life. The Sweet Emergency Fund has raised thousands of dollars for those living with HIV or AIDS.  Her dedication to students has led to numerous recognitions including the Thor J. Jager M.D. Award for Distinguished Clinical Teaching; American Medical Association "Pride in the Profession" Award and the Humanitarian of the Year Award from the KU School of Medicine. She has served on numerous not-for-profit boards including the Kansas Foundation for the Handicap, Junior League of Wichita Inc., United Way of the Plains and Positive Directions, and she has been recognized for her volunteer and professional excellence by countless groups.

The Honorable Kathryn H. Vratil, chief judge, U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas: Vratil earned her Bachelor of Arts in American studies from KU in 1971. She then attended KU Law School, earning her juris doctorate in 1975. In 1975 she began clerking for Judge Earl O’Connor at the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas. In 1978, Vratil became an associate at Lathrop & Gage LLC. Five years later she was named a partner in the litigation department where she stayed until becoming municipal judge for the city of Prairie Village in 1990. In 1992 Vratil was the first woman to be appointed to the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas. In 2008 she was appointed chief judge and continues in that position today. Vratil is a member of the Central Exchange in Kansas City, an organization created to increase opportunities for personal, professional and philanthropic growth for women.

Student honorees are as follows:

  • Hannah Bolton, Saint Libory, Neb., a senior in business management, Outstanding Woman Student in On-Campus Housing and Sororities.
  • Kayla Cowell, Leawood, junior, finance & management, Outstanding Woman Student in On-Campus Housing and Sororities.
  • Kylie Krizek, Mission Hills, junior, pre-business and speech-language-hearing, Outstanding Woman Student in On-Campus Housing and Sororities.
  • Leigh Loving, McPherson, sophomore, human biology, Outstanding Woman Student in On-Campus Housing and Sororities.
  • Emma Hogg, Overland Park, freshman, journalism, Outstanding Woman Student in On-Campus Housing and Sororities.
  • Lisa Wojcehowicz, Milwaukee, junior, journalism, Outstanding Woman Student in On-Campus Housing and Sororities
  • Elizabeth Boresow, Leawood, senior, music therapy, Outstanding Woman Student in On-Campus Housing and Sororities
  • Candice Thompson, Plano, Texas, sophomore, pre-business, Outstanding Woman Student in On-Campus Housing and Sororities
  • Thanh Hai Cao, Hue, Vietnam, graduate student in American studies, Outstanding Woman Student in On-Campus Housing and Sororities.
  • J. Christine Spencer, Sandy, Utah, freshman in dance, Outstanding Woman Student in On-Campus Housing and Sororities.
  • Jennifer Garren, Overland Park, senior in business management, Outstanding Woman Student in On-Campus Housing and Sororities.
  • Samantha Benson, Prairie Village, senior in neurobiology, Outstanding Woman Student in On-Campus Housing and Sororities.
  • Erin Christiansen, Chanute, sophomore in environmental studies, Outstanding Woman Student in On-Campus Housing and Sororities
  • Miranda Naylor, Garnett, senior in pre-pharmacy, Outstanding Woman Student in On-Campus Housing and Sororities
  • Sara Anderson, Lindsborg, Outstanding Woman Student in On-Campus Housing and Sororities
  • Ramona Yoder, Newton, junior in psychology, Outstanding Woman Student in On-Campus Housing and Sororities
  • Lauren Arney, Stilwell, freshman, Alma Poehler Brook Memorial Award
  • Denise Barnes, Wichita, sophomore in journalism, Alma Poehler Brook Memorial Award
  • Andelyn Fernandez, Wichita, Alma Poehler Brook Memorial Award
  • Andrea Geubelle, University Place, Wash., senior in community health, Outstanding Woman Student in Athletics
  • Ashley Arenholz, Olathe, senior in applied behavioral science, Outstanding Woman Student in Community Service
  • Haley Miller, Kingman, senior in English and women, gender and sexuality studies, Outstanding Woman Student in Leadership
  • Lauren Reinhart, Parkville, Mo., senior in architecture, Outstanding Woman Student in Partnership
  • Alexandra Nicki Rose, Topeka, senior in political science, Outstanding Woman Student in Partnership
  • Ellen Frizzell, Prairie Village, senior in mechanical engineering, Sally Mason Woman Student in Science Award
  • Kristi Marks, Eureka, senior in accounting, Marlesa and Hannalesa Roney Student Success Mentor Award.

For more information, email emilytaylorcenter@ku.edu or call (785) 864-3552.
 

 

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