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The Rise Of Anti-Sharia Legislation

Source: 
KCUR 89.3 FM
Author: 
Brian Ellison, Suzanne Hogan and Matthew Long-Middleton
Date: 
Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Most religions have rules, guidance, law of some kind. Christians look to the teachings of Jesus, or the commandments. Jewish people turn to Torah. And Muslims look to Shariah—the code of Islamic law that guides everything from what to eat and how to dress to bigger questions—like resolving marital disputes, or punishing violent crimes.

Guests Raj Bhala, a Rice Distinguished Professor and Associate Dean for International and Comparative Law, University of Kansas School of Law; Mahnaz Shabbir, an active member of the local Muslim community, past president of the Heartland Muslim Council; and Ryan Boyer, a law student at KU, explore why American legislatures and the U.S. Congress are talking—and have been talking for years—about religious law.

They also explore just what Sharia is and why it matters. And we’ll hear why so many states have made a point of banning Sharia. Kansas has already done so and—if the governor signs the bill waiting on his desk—Missouri will too.

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