Tribal Judicial Support Clinic

Students are assigned research projects from participating tribal courts. They provide research assistance to tribal court judges and personnel in projects that range from tribal code development, legal research and drafting of legal memoranda and judicial orders. The clinic is open to students that have taken Federal Indian Law; Sovereignty, Self-Determination and the Indigenous Nations; or Native American Natural Resources Law. This clinic also satisfies the Tribal Lawyer Certificate Program internship requirement.

No application is required. Students enter the clinic by following standard enrollment procedures for:

LAW 998 Tribal Judicial Support Clinic
Students are assigned research projects from participating tribal courts as arranged by the instructor. Students provide research assistance to tribal court personnel in an array of projects that range from tribal code development, legal research and drafting of legal memoranda and judicial orders. Prerequisite: Federal Indian Law; Sovereignty, Self-Determination, and the Indigenous Nations; or Native American Natural Resources.
Fall 2014
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Kronk,Elizabeth
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
3 20559
Questions?

Elizabeth A. Kronk Warner
Director, Tribal Law & Government Center
Associate Professor of Law
785-864-1139
elizabeth.kronk@ku.edu

Submit a Request for Assistance

Interested in obtaining assistance from the Tribal Judicial Support Clinic? Use this form to submit a work request.

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