Re-trial process starts for Robinson in 2006 fire death

TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) - The attorney defending Frank "Chicago" Jerome Robinson, whose conviction was overturned in the death of a woman killed in an apartment house fire started by arson, asked a judge on Thursday to place him on house arrest while awaiting re-trial.

If not house arrest, KiAnn Caprice, the attorney representing Robinson, asked the judge to consider modifying Robinson's $250,000 surety bond.

Shawnee County District Court Judge Cheryl Rios didn't place him on house arrest nor trim his bond.

Robinson's bond remained at $250,000 with surety.

Retrial in fire death for 'Chicago' Robinson to start in February

"The retrial of a man charged with the 2006 slaying of a woman who died in a downtown fire will start on Feb. 27, a Shawnee County District judge said Thursday.

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On Aug. 19, Shawnee County Chief Judge Evelyn Wilson issued the ruling overturning Robinson’s murder conviction in the death of Marvina Washington, 53, and ordered that he be tried again.

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Shawnee County judge overturns man's conviction of murder citing previous trial was unfair

"Ten years after the body of fire victim Marvina Washington, 53, was lowered from a second-floor window of her burned-out central Topeka apartment, the conviction of defendant Frank Jerome 'Chicago' Robinson was overturned this month.

'Upon extensive review of the record and the parties' arguments, this court concludes that (Robinson) was not fairly convicted and, therefore, vacates his conviction,' Shawnee County Chief Judge Evelyn Wilson ruled.

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A Case for Innocence: Students, non-profits work to protect rights of accused

"This is the scene inside the Paul E. Wilson Project for Innocence and Post-Conviction Remedies. All those files represent the life of a person in a Kansas correctional facility. It is those files that law students will be pouring over to determine if they can make a case to win that person a new trial and another chance at freedom or, at least, a more fair sentence - if it's warranted.

Four Shots in Oskie: How Tom Bledsoe (almost) got away with murder, Part 3: The trial of Floyd Bledsoe

"The tragic death of 14-year-old Camille Arfmann became a dual tragedy with the wrongful conviction of Floyd Bledsoe. A sheriff’s hunch and apparent misrepresentation of polygraph results led to his arrest; a prosecutor’s fabrications, teamed with alleged act of incompetence by his defense attorney, led to his conviction; and the repeated falsehoods of his brother kept him behind bars for nearly 6,000 days.

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'I don’t think they know how it happened, which is troubling,' said Alice Craig, Floyd’s trial attorney. 'Investigators look back on it and they’re mortified.'

Four Shots in Oskie: How Tom Bledsoe (almost) got away with murder, Part 2: The search for Camille Arfmann

"The case of Camille, like thousands of others, has benefitted from the advent of improved forensics testing. In 2013, the Project for Innocence and Post-Conviction Remedies at the University of Kansas asked the Serological Research Institute to test the sexual assault kit again, along with Camille’s clothing. Casseday Baker, a forensic serologist, published his results on Sept. 2, 2015. News articles about Baker’s findings were read on Tom’s cellphone not long before he ended his life."

 

 

Four Shots in Oskie: How Tom Bledsoe (almost) got away with murder, Part 1: The confessions of Tom Bledsoe

"On a cold, wintry day in late December, Floyd sat calmly in an office at the University of Kansas’ Project for Innocence and Post-Conviction Remedies. It had been three weeks since his life sentence for first-degree murder was vacated and he was released from a cell at Lansing Correctional Facility. He was ready for his first interview.

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Floyd Bledsoe released after his 2000 Jefferson County murder conviction is overturned

"After 16 years behind bars for a murder his brother eventually took responsibility for, Floyd Bledsoe is a free man.

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Bledsoe, who has been represented by attorneys with the Project for Innocence and Post-Conviction Remedies at the University of Kansas Law School and Midwest Innocence Project, smiled during much of Tuesday’s proceedings and hugged teary-eyed well-wishers after the judge agreed to release him. A crowd of roughly 50 people cheered inside the courtroom when the judge’s decision was announced."

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