Judge overturns Bledsoe's murder conviction, released after 16 years behind bars

A Kansas man who had served more than 15 years of a life sentence for the 1999 shooting death of his sister-in-law is a free man, after a county judge overturned his conviction.

Floyd Bledsoe was ordered released Tuesday after attorneys presented new evidence that implicated his late brother in the death of 14-year-old Camille Arfmann.

 

Judge overturns Kansas man's conviction in sister-in-law's 1999 killing

 "A Kansas man who served more than 15 years of a life sentence for the 1999 shooting death of his sister-in-law was freed Tuesday after a judge overturned his conviction when new evidence implicated the man's brother as the likely killer.

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The decision came after a Jefferson County Sheriff's investigator testified that Bledsoe's brother, Thomas, killed himself last month after DNA evidence implicated him in the death of 14-year-old Camille Arfmann. Thomas Bledsoe left behind suicide letters admitting he killed the girl.

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‘I had sex with her, and killed her,’ Suicide notes that helped Floyd Bledsoe become a free man

"A Kansas man is free after spending 16 years behind bars for a murder his brother committed.

Floyd Bledsoe was serving a life sentence for killing his 14-year-old sister-in-law, Camille Arfmann. However, attorneys with the Project for Innocence and Post-Conviction Remedies at Kansas University released DNA evidence in late October showing semen found in Arfmann’s body likely belonged to Floyd’s brother, Tom Bledsoe."

 

Judge throws out 2000 murder conviction, frees Oskaloosa man after 15 years in prison

"Floyd Scott Bledsoe was set free Tuesday after a Jefferson County judge overturned his life sentence for the 1999 murder of his 14-year-old sister-in-law.

New evidence, including DNA evidence and three suicide letters written by his brother Tom Bledsoe, indicate that Floyd Bledsoe was not the killer. Floyd Bledsoe spent more than 15 years in prison.

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Attorneys claim new DNA testing uncovers truth behind 1999 Oskaloosa murder

"For nearly a decade, lawyers with the Project for Innocence and Post-Conviction Remedies have combed trial testimony and evidence in search of something that will free Floyd Scott Bledsoe, 38, from the prison cell he occupies at Lansing Correctional Facility.

Last month, they may have found it.

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'We often say we believe our client is innocent,' said Elizabeth Cateforis, supervising attorney for the Project for Innocence. 'Floyd is innocent. There’s no belief about it.'

Paul E. Wilson Project for Innocence at KU files motion in 15 year old murder case

"The Paul E. Wilson Project for Innocence and Post-Conviction Remedies filed a Motion to Vacate Judgment and Discharge from Custody on behalf of Bledsoe at the Second Judicial District Court in Jefferson County Monday.

In 2000, Bledsoe was sentenced to life in prison for the death of his 14-year-old sister-in-law, Camille Arfmann, near Oskaloosa. Bledsoe was originally convicted of first-degree murder, aggravated kidnapping and indecent liberties of Arfmann; however, DNA testing presented by the defense may exonerate him of all charges.

KU Project for Innocence, Midwest Innocence Project seeks to free convicted murderer with DNA evidence

"Attorneys at KU’s Project for Innocence and the Midwest Innocence Project are asking a Jefferson County judge to reverse Floyd Bledsoe’s conviction and set him free in a motion filed Tuesday.

Bledsoe, 38, has been serving a life sentence for more than 15 years for the 1999 shooting death of Arfmann, his then-14-year-old sister-in-law.

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University of Kansas law student helps overturn murder conviction

 "A murder conviction was overturned and it was in large part because of the work by a University of Kansas law student and Shawnee native.

Abby West spent more than 100 hours on Kimberly Sharp’s case with the Project for Innocence.

On July 2, 2006 authorities found the body of David Owen near the Kansas River in Topeka.

Owen called himself an advocate for the homeless and often tried to convince them to reunite with their families.

KU Innocence Project claims win in appeal case of woman convicted in high-profile Topeka murder

"As Abby West researched similar cases to prepare for the federal appeal of a woman convicted in a high-profile Topeka murder case, she encountered a recurring theme.

'I read a lot of cases where people didn’t win,' said West, a May Kansas University law school graduate.

But for defendant Kimberly Sharp, West’s efforts resulted in a different outcome — and a big success for the KU law school’s Project for Innocence and Post-Conviction Remedies.

KU law students take on inmates' appeal cases


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