Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 26, All day
Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 27, All day
Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 28, All day
Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 29, All day
Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 30, All day

WBB vs. Georgetown
Nov. 23, 02:00 pm
MBB vs. Rider
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Volleyball vs. West Virginia
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WBB vs. Iona
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Volleyball vs. Oklahoma
Nov. 29, 12:00 pm

Kansas Law Review

Kansas Law Review

Issues (PDF)

Volume 62, Issue 1


Volume 62, Issue 2


Volume 62, Issue 3


Volume 62, Issue 4


Volume 62, Issue 5

Volume 61, Issue 1


Volume 61, Issue 2


Volume 61, Issue 3


Volume 61, Issue 4


Volume 61, Issue 5

Volume 60, Issue 1


Volume 60, Issue 2


Volume 60, Issue 3


Volume 60, Issue 4


Volume 60, Issue 5

Volume 59, Issue 1


Volume 59, Issue 2


Volume 59, Issue 3


Volume 59, Issue 4


Volume 59, Issue 5

Volume 58, Issue 1


Volume 58, Issue 2


Volume 58, Issue 3


Volume 58, Issue 4


Volume 58, Issue 5

Volume 57, Issue 1


Volume 57, Issue 2


Volume 57, Issue 3


Volume 57, Issue 4 (Symposium Issue: Law, Reparations & Racial Disparities)


Volume 57, Issue 5 (Kansas Issue)

Volume 56, Issue 1


Volume 56, Issue 2


Volume 56, Issue 3


Volume 56, Issue 4 (Kansas Issue)


Volume 56, Issue 5 (Symposium Issue - Biolaw: Law at the Frontiers of Biology)

Volume 55, Issue 1


Volume 55, Issue 2


Volume 55, Issue 3


Volume 55, Issue 4 (Kansas Issue)

  • Criminal Procedure Survey
  • Robert C. Casad, In Memoriam-William Arthur Kelly
  • Pamela V. Keller and Elinor P. Schroeder, Survey of Kansas Employment Law
  • Suzanne Carey McAllister, Some Recent Developments in Kansas Residential Landlord-Tenant Law and Evictions
  • Brian Moline & M. H. Hoeflich, Some Kansas Lawyer Poets
  • M.H. Hoeflich, The Great Kansas Seed Swindle
  • Zach Lerner, Rethinking What Agriculture Could Use
  • David Warner, Are the Corporation and Its Employees the Same?: Piercing the Intracorporate Conspiracy Doctrine in a Post-Enron World
  • Joe Bant, United States v. Rosen: Pushing the Free Press onto a Slippery Slope?

Volume 55, Issue 5 (Symposium Issue - The Massachusetts Plan and the Future of Universal Coverage)

Perspectives on Health Reform

  • Timothy Stoltzfus Jost, The Massachusetts Health Plan: Public Insurance for the Poor, Private Insurance for the Wealthy, Self-Insurance for the Rest?
  • David A. Hyman, The Massachusetts Health Plan: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
  • Michael H. Fox, Healthcare Reform: The Rhetoric and the Reality
  • Theodore Marmor, Healthcare Reform: The Rhetoric and the Reality

Regulatory Issues

  • Joan H. Krause, Fraud in Universal Coverage: The Usual Suspects (and then Some)
  • Peter D. Jacobson and Rebecca L. Braun, Let 1000 Flowers Wilt: The Futility of State-Level Heath Care Reform
  • Amy B. Monahan, Pay or Play Laws, ERISA, Preemption, and Potential Lessons from Massachusetts

Implementing Universal Coverage

  • William M. Sage, Might the Fact that 90% of Americans Live Within 15 Miles of a Wal-Mart Help Achieve Universal Health Care?
  • Melissa B. Jacoby, Individual Health Insurance Mandates and Financial Distress: A Few Notes from the Debtor-Creditor Research and Debates
  • Stephen J. Ware, "Medical-Related Financial Distress" and Health Care Finance: A Reply to Professor Melissa Jacoby
  • Jerry Menikoff, (Too) Much Ado About the Ethics of Less-than-Universal Access to Health Care?
  • Elizabeth A. Weeks, Failure to Connect: The Massachusetts Plan for Individual Health Insurance

State Experiences

  • Christie L. Hager, Massachusetts Health Reform: A Social Compact and a Bold Experiment
  • Sidney D. Watson, Timothy McBride, Heather Bednarek and Muhammad Islam, The Road from Massachusetts to Missouri: What Will it Take for Other States to Replicate Massachusetts Health Reform?
  • Marcia J. Nielsen, Health Care System Reform in Kansas: Context, Challenges, and Capacity

 

Contact the Kansas Law Review

785-864-3463
kulawrev@ku.edu

Faculty Advisor
Christopher Drahozal
785-864-9239
drahozal@ku.edu

KU Law Review on Twitter @ukanlrevKansas Law Review on LinkedIn

Why KU
  • One-third of full-time faculty have written casebooks used at U.S. law schools
  • 2 KU law faculty were U.S. Supreme Court clerks
  • KU’s Project for Innocence: 33 conviction reversals since 2009
  • 7,300+ alumni live in all 50 states and 18 foreign countries
  • #18 “best value” law school in the nation — National Jurist Magazine
  • 12 interdisciplinary joint degrees
  • 27th nationwide for lowest debt at graduation. — U.S. News & World Report
  • 70 percent of upper-level law classes have 25 or fewer students
  • Nearly 800 employment interviews at law school, 2012-13
  • Top 25% for number of 2013 grads hired by the nation’s largest law firms
  • 20th: for number of law alumni promoted to partner at the 250 largest law firms